CFP: [18th] NACBS: "Eighteenth-Century British Biocultures"

full name / name of organization: 
Jonathan Nash
contact email: 
jn211278@albany.edu

I am interested in forming a panel with the proposed title,
"Eighteenth-Century British Biocultures," for the 2008 North American
Conference on British Studies (http://www.nacbs.org/). In the Summer 2007
issue of New Literary History, Lennard J. Davis and David B. Morris
published the "Biocultures Manifesto." Davis and Morris argue, "culture
and history must be rethought with an understanding of their inextricable,
if highly variable, relation to biology. The general name for this
phenomenon we call 'biocultures.'" This panel wishes to explore and test
the applicability of Davis and Morris’s "bioculture" paradigm to the study
of the eighteenth-century British World — England, Scotland, Wales,
Ireland, and British Empire. I solicit paper proposals from scholars who
explore the convergence of the biological — in its widest possible form,
including science, environment, and medicine — with the cultural in the
eighteenth-century British world.

My proposed paper analyzes a ubiquitous discourse of circulation that
traversed multiple literary genres — medical, fiction, law, politics, and
reform — as a technology of power members of multiple social classes
struggled to control and influence. The paper argues that an analysis of
a discourse of circulation demonstrates the emergence of an
eighteenth-century British bioculture — the interconnection of the
biological and the cultural.

I welcome the participation of historians and literary critics, as
presenters, commentator, or chair, who study the convergence of biology and
culture — biocultures — in the eighteenth-century British World. The
deadline for panel submissions is February 15. I look forward to hearing
from you soon.

Best wishes,
Jonathan Nash
University at Albany
jn211278_at_albany.edu

===================================
 From the Literary Calls for Papers Mailing List
            cfp_at_english.upenn.edu
             more information at
         http://cfp.english.upenn.edu
===================================
Received on Sun Jan 27 2008 - 14:17:00 EST

cfp categories: 
eighteenth_century