CFP: [18th] Captivity Narratives in Literature, Film, and the Press

full name / name of organization: 
Deborah Carmichael
contact email: 
carmic28@msu.edu

CFP: Captivity Narratives in Literature, Film, and the Press
The 30th Annual Meeting of the SW/TX PCA/ACA

February 25-28, 2009
Hyatt Regency Albuquerque
Albuquerque, New Mexico

JOIN IN THE CELEBRATION OF 30 YEARS OF SCHOLARSHIP AND COLLEGIALITY!

Proposal Deadline: December 1, 2008
        
Rowlandson may have set a classroom standard for captivity narratives in
American literature classes, but there are many, many other stories to be
considered. In addition to those captured by Native Americans, slave
narratives also tell stories of life in captivity. These narratives are
not limited to an American tradition; many folk and fairy tales preceded
these examples. Other cultures, continents, and nations have tales to
tell. Today’s news coverage of 21st century piracy indicates that
captivity narratives are current events. And, Hollywood has often turned
to POW plotlines for feature films.

Topics might include, but are not limited to:
•Historical and cultural contexts of captivity narratives
•The roles of gender, class, colonization, and power in these stories
•Traditions of the captivity narrative in Asia, Africa, Europe, or South
America
•Adaptation of stories from literature or news coverage to film
•The narrative structures of captivity tales

Proposal Deadline: December 1, 2008

Submission Guidelines—send a 150 word abstract and brief bio to:
Deborah Carmichael—Michigan State University—carmic28_at_msu.edu

Visit the web site for further details on special conference events,
registration, accommodations, and other attendance perks at:
http://swtxpca.org/documents/123.html

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Received on Tue Sep 09 2008 - 07:30:48 EDT

cfp categories: 
eighteenth_century