UPDATE: Representing Segregation (3/15/07; journal issue)

full name / name of organization: 
normbria_at_isu.edu
contact email: 
normbria@isu.edu

Updated CFP
Update=3A The guest editors of a special issue of African American Revie=
w on Representing Segregation are still looking for proposals for projec=
ts that address the special issue topic in the late nineteenth century=2E=
 The original call for papers is appended below=2E =

 =

The extended deadline for proposals on the late nineteenth century is Ma=
rch 15=2C 2007=2E Send inquiries or proposals to Brian Norman (normbria=40=
isu=2Eedu) and Piper Kendrix Williams (williamp=40tcnj=2Eedu)=2E Complet=
ed papers will due by May 1=2C 2007=2E More information=2C including a l=
ink to the special issue website at http=3A//aar=2Eslu=2Eedu/=2E
 =

Representing Segregation
A special issue of African American Review
 =

African American Review is soliciting papers for a special issue on Repr=
esenting Segregation slated for publication in early 2008=2E Is there an=
 identifiable literary tradition responding to=2C representing=2C or pro=
testing U=2ES=2E racial segregation=3F Examination of individual works=2C=
 authors=2C genres=2C or movements are welcome=2E =

 =

Segregation=97as an historical condition=2C a political ideology=2C a mu=
nicipal planning scheme=2C and a de facto social system=97profoundly sha=
ped the lives of African Americans and other groups in the first half of=
 the twentieth century=2C at least=2E Whether protesting=2C rejecting=2C=
 refusing=2C or reaffirming segregation=2C numerous writers have necessa=
rily responded to the history and experience of racial division in their=
 literary projects=2E The past two decades of African-American literary =
studies have evidenced great interest in the tropes=2C narratives=2C and=
 legacies of slavery=2C migration=2C and diaspora within the literary im=
agination=2E In addition=2C in recent years scholars have studied specif=
ic practices of segregation in literature=2C most notably lynching=2E A =
broad inquiry into literatures of segregation is necessary to account fo=
r the literary legacy associated with practices of U=2ES=2E racial segre=
gation=2E =

 =

Possible questions individual articles might ask include=2C but are not =
limited to=3A
* Is there such thing as a segregation narrative or a Jim Crow narrative=
=3F Is this a formalist=2C ideological=2C or historicist project=3F
* How have the historical conditions of racial segregation informed narr=
atives of race=2C nation=2C and geography=3F
* What are the aesthetic techniques employed by Black writers to represe=
nt and protest racial segregation=3F Should these be in conversation wit=
h apologist or white supremacist writers of segregation literature=2C su=
ch as Thomas F=2E Dixon=3F =

* Where is segregation located=3F Is there a geography underpinning the =
literary imagination arising from segregation narratives=3F What place d=
o segregation narratives have in literatures of migration=3F
* What is the relation between literatures of segregation and literature=
s of separatism or racial self-determination=3F
* How and why have writers from different ethnic or racial backgrounds b=
orrowed=2C built from=2C or rejected African American representations of=
 segregation=3F
* Can transnational figures and texts like Richard Wright=92s expatriate=
 writings=2C W=2EE=2E B=2E DuBois=92 Ghanaian citizenship=2C James Baldw=
in=92s European essays=2C or June Jordan=92s anti-apartheid work elucida=
te the way writers negotiate the domestic and the international within s=
egregation=3F =

* What does an African-American literary tradition writ large look like =
from the vantage of a distinct tradition of literatures of segregation=3F=

 =

Send inquiries or proposals to Brian Norman (normbria=40isu=2Eedu) and P=
iper Kendrix Williams (williamp=40tcnj=2Eedu)=2E Inquiries by December 1=
5=2C 2006=3B completed papers are due by May 1=2C 2007=2E More informati=
on=2C including a link to the special issue website at http=3A//aar=2Esl=
u=2Eedu/=2E

=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F
Brian Norman=2C Ph=2ED=2E
Assistant Professor of English
Co-Director of Women=27s Studies
Idaho State University
normbria=40isu=2Eedu
office=3A LA 155 =7C phone=3A 208=2E282=2E4384
www=2Eisu=2Eedu/=7Enormbria

--Boundary_(ID_5ZTYJm5acz4S148Aci7UOw)
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=3Aoffice=3Aoffice=22 /=3E=3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3EUpdate=3A T=
he guest editors of a special issue of African American Review on Repres=
enting Segregation are still looking for proposals for projects that add=
ress the special issue topic in the late nineteenth century=2E The origi=
nal call for papers is appended below=2E =3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E=

=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E=3Co=3Ap=3E=
=26nbsp=3B=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3EThe extende=
d deadline for proposals on the late nineteenth century is March 15=2C 2=
007=2E Send inquiries or proposals to Brian Norman (normbria=40isu=2Eedu=
) and Piper Kendrix Williams (williamp=40tcnj=2Eedu)=2E Completed papers=
 will due by May 1=2C 2007=2E More information=2C including a link to th=
e special issue website at http=3A//aar=2Eslu=2Eedu/=2E=3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3A=
p=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E=3Co=3Ap=3E=
=26nbsp=3B=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3ERepresentin=
g Segregation=3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3EA special i=
ssue of African American Review=3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E=3Co=3Ap=3E=
=26nbsp=3B=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3EAfrican Ame=
rican Review is soliciting papers for a special issue on Representing Se=
gregation slated for publication in early 2008=2E Is there an identifiab=
le literary tradition responding to=2C representing=2C or protesting =3C=
=3Fxml=3Anamespace prefix =3D st1 ns =3D =22urn=3Aschemas-microsoft-com=3A=
office=3Asmarttags=22 /=3E=3Cst1=3Acountry-region w=3Ast=3D=22on=22=3E=3C=
st1=3Aplace w=3Ast=3D=22on=22=3EU=2ES=2E=3C/st1=3Aplace=3E=3C/st1=3Acoun=
try-region=3E racial segregation=3F Examination of individual works=2C a=
uthors=2C genres=2C or movements are welcome=2E =3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C=
/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E=3Co=3Ap=3E=
=26nbsp=3B=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3ESegregation=
=97as an historical condition=2C a political ideology=2C a municipal pla=
nning scheme=2C and a de facto social system=97profoundly shaped the liv=
es of African Americans and other groups in the first half of the twenti=
eth century=2C at least=2E Whether protesting=2C rejecting=2C refusing=2C=
 or reaffirming segregation=2C numerous writers have necessarily respond=
ed to the history and experience of racial division in their literary pr=
ojects=2E The past two decades of African-American literary studies have=
 evidenced great interest in the tropes=2C narratives=2C and legacies of=
 slavery=2C migration=2C and diaspora within the literary imagination=2E=
 In addition=2C in recent years scholars have studied specific practices=
 of segregation in literature=2C most notably lynching=2E A broad inquir=
y into literatures of segregation is necessary to account for the litera=
ry legacy associated with practices of =3Cst1=3Acountry-region w=3Ast=3D=
=22on=22=3E=3Cst1=3Aplace w=3Ast=3D=22on=22=3EU=2ES=2E=3C/st1=3Aplace=3E=
=3C/st1=3Acountry-region=3E racial segregation=2E =3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=
=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E=3Co=3Ap=3E=
=26nbsp=3B=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3EPossible qu=
estions individual articles might ask include=2C but are not limited to=3A=
=3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E* Is there =
such thing as a segregation narrative or a Jim Crow narrative=3F Is this=
 a formalist=2C ideological=2C or historicist project=3F=3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=
=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E* How have =
the historical conditions of racial segregation informed narratives of r=
ace=2C nation=2C and geography=3F=3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E* What are =
the aesthetic techniques employed by Black writers to represent and prot=
est racial segregation=3F Should these be in conversation with apologist=
 or white supremacist writers of segregation literature=2C such as Thoma=
s F=2E Dixon=3F =3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E* Where is =
segregation located=3F Is there a geography underpinning the literary im=
agination arising from segregation narratives=3F What place do segregati=
on narratives have in literatures of migration=3F=3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=
=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E* What is t=
he relation between literatures of segregation and literatures of separa=
tism or racial self-determination=3F=3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E* How and w=
hy have writers from different ethnic or racial backgrounds borrowed=2C =
built from=2C or rejected African American representations of segregatio=
n=3F=3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E* Can trans=
national figures and texts like Richard Wright=92s expatriate writings=2C=
 W=2EE=2E B=2E DuBois=92 Ghanaian citizenship=2C James Baldwin=92s Europ=
ean essays=2C or June Jordan=92s anti-apartheid work elucidate the way w=
riters negotiate the domestic and the international within segregation=3F=
 =3Co=3Ap=3E=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E* What does=
 an African-American literary tradition writ large look like from the va=
ntage of a distinct tradition of literatures of segregation=3F=3Co=3Ap=3E=
=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3E=3Co=3Ap=3E=
=26nbsp=3B=3C/o=3Ap=3E=3C/P=3E
=3CP class=3DMsoNormal style=3D=22MARGIN=3A 0in 0in 0pt=22=3ESend inquir=
ies or proposals to Brian Norman (normbria=40isu=2Eedu) and Piper Kendri=
x Williams (williamp=40tcnj=2Eedu)=2E Inquiries by December 15=2C 2006=3B=
 completed papers are due by May 1=2C 2007=2E More information=2C includ=
ing a link to the special issue website at http=3A//aar=2Eslu=2Eedu/=2E=3C=
/P=3E=3CBR=3E=3CBR=3E=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=5F=
=5F=5F=5F
=3Cbr=3EBrian Norman=2C Ph=2ED=2E
=3Cbr=3EAssistant Professor of English
=3Cbr=3ECo-Director of Women=27s Studies
=3Cbr=3EIdaho State University
=3Cbr=3Enormbria=40isu=2Eedu
=3Cbr=3Eoffice=3A LA 155 =7C phone=3A 208=2E282=2E4384
=3Cbr=3Ewww=2Eisu=2Eedu/=7Enormbria
=3Cbr=3E=3C/BR=3E=3C/BR=3E

--Boundary_(ID_5ZTYJm5acz4S148Aci7UOw)--
Received on Sat Feb 03 2007 - 17:12:49 EST

cfp categories: 
ethnicity_and_national_identity