Subscribe to RSS - bibliography and history of the book

bibliography and history of the book

Ways of Reading: Beyond, Beneath, and Beside Theory (Grad Conference)

updated: 
Friday, October 12, 2018 - 12:59pm
Johns Hopkins University, Department of Comparative Thought and Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 16, 2018

The Graduate Students of the Department of Comparative Thought and Literature at Johns Hopkins University are proud to announce their bi-annual conference on February 22 and 23, 2019. We are pleased to host keynote speakers Heather Love (Associate Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania) and Bernie Rhie (Associate Professor of English, Williams College).

Teaching the History of the Book (edited collection)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 4:36pm
MLA Options for Teaching series
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 17, 2018

Teaching the History of the Bookwill assemble essays by scholars and teachers from across all fields of literary and language study, exploring theories, practices, and problems in teaching about and with the history of the book. Essays in the volume will provide historical context, theoretical frames, and practical insights for effectively teaching the history of the book, as a subject in its own right and as a component or method in courses on other subjects in the field of literature and language, both within and beyond the Anglophone world.

Milton and Materiality

updated: 
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 3:45pm
UC Berkeley - Townsend Center Working Group for the History of the Book
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, December 1, 2018

A good book is the precious lifeblood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life. 

Mad, Bad, and Dangerous Texts: Controversies in Reading, Writing, Editing, and Printing

updated: 
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 4:38pm
Book History and Print Culture Graduate Student Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 14, 2018

Mad, Bad, and Dangerous Texts:

Controversies in Reading, Writing, Editing, and Printing

 

Please circulate widely.

 

In addition to conveying controversial ideas, books themselves have both committed and inspired mad, bad, and dangerous behaviour. The production and consumption of printed matter can be subversive, destructive, or downright criminal. Studying books as material objects reveals controversies that are fascinating in their own right, regardless of the subject matter between their covers.

GENESIS – CRACOW 2019 Genetic Criticism: from Theory to Practice

updated: 
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 4:03pm
Jagiellonian University (Cracow), Institut des Textes et Manuscrits Modernes (Paris)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 31, 2018

Faculty of Polish Studies at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow
and
Institut des Textes & Manuscrits Modernes (ITEM) in Paris
are pleased to invite you to participate in the international conference

GENESIS  –  CRACOW 2019   

Genetic Criticism: from Theory to Practice
12 - 14 June 2019

Location: Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland)
Language: English

Proposal (title and abstract) submission is now open:   conf.genesis@uj.edu.pl

[Update] Journal of the Georgia Philological Association

updated: 
Thursday, October 11, 2018 - 9:09am
Georgia Philological Association (GPA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

The Journal of the Georgia Philological Association is now accepting submissions for its annual publication.  Submissions requirements can be on any area related to language, literature, and philology from any time period and discipline.  In fact, previous issues have included everything from ancient to postmodern works of literature, pop culture, history, religion, and even politics. The deadline for submissions is November 1, 2018.  Those accepted for publication must be/become members of the Georgia Philological Association.  Manuscripts should be no more than 8,000 words.

Session on Medieval and Early Modern Drama

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2018 - 4:04pm
43rd Comparative Literature Conference-Orlando, FL
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 15, 2018

This session of the Comparative Drama Conference explores the ways in which this year’s conference locale—Orlando, Florida—crosses paths with the culture of medieval and early modern drama. Included among Central Florida’s most notable and popular theatrical productions are theme park stage adaptations of animated films and cinematic blockbusters (think Finding Nemo-The Musical etc.). How do medieval and early modern dramatic works similarly appropriate, convert and dramatize other types of scripted or choreographed performances (oral legends; religious rituals and practices; courtroom dramas; political spectacles etc.) —and to what practical and ideological ends?

 

Medievalists @ Penn 11th Annual Conference - Mediocrity in the Middle Ages: Finding the Middle Ground

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2018 - 3:39pm
Medievalists @ Penn
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 2, 2018

Mediocrity in the Middle Ages: Finding the Middle Ground11th Annual Medievalists @ Penn (M@P) Graduate ConferenceUniversity of Pennsylvania, February 22nd, 2019Confirmed Keynote Speaker: Sonja Drimmer (UMass Amherst, Art History) What makes something “mediocre” in the Middle Ages? We often assume that if a manuscript, literary text, or work of visual or performance art has survived from the medieval period, it is exceptional in some way. Modern scholarship tends to enforce this assumption by either praising a work for its beauty and importance, or arguing for the centrality and exceptionality of something that past scholarship has ignored. But what of things that have survived that are just OK?

Rebellious Writing: Marginalised Edwardians and the Struggle for Symbolic Power

updated: 
Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 10:18am
Lauren O' Hagan
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

This volume will explore ‘ordinary writing’ – that is, ‘writing that is typically unseen or ignored and is primarily defined by its status as discardable’[1] – as an important new way in which to approach the power and identity of marginalised groups in Edwardian Britain (1901-1914). The Edwardian era is often described as a period of intense social conflict and upheaval marked by a heightened awareness of class consciousness, inequality and poverty. Vast social, political and economic changes led to an increasing mobilisation of the lower classes and women, while also bringing about a rise in the number of anarchists and revolutionaries.

Pages