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african-american

Antebellum City Texts: Print Culture and Emergent U.S. Metropolitan Spaces

updated: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:34am
Brigitte Bailey / Univ of New Hampshire
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Call for Papers, for the next NeMLA conference, in Boston, March 5-8, 2020.

NeMLA’s theme this year will be:"Shaping and Sharing Identities: Spaces, Places, Languages, and Cultures"

This is an accepted session.

Antebellum City Texts: Print Culture and Emergent U.S. Metropolitan Spaces   

Reading Politics and Art in the Poetry of Tracy K. Smith (NEMLA 2020 Panel)

updated: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:12am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

CFP for the 51st Annual NEMLA Conference in Boston, Massachusetts, March 5 - 8, 2019

Tracy K. Smith, with four books of poetry, a volume of memoirs, a Pulitzer Prize and two stints as America's poet laureate, has every claim to be a major American poet at the pinnacle of success. It is easy to dwell on the mainstream acceptance that this success has earned. Her work is often described in highly aesthetic language, with an emphasis on its beauty and craft, and she sits neatly in the American poetic tradition. Among those poets she considers “most necessary” she invokes Seamus Heaney, Elizabeth Bishop, and Philip Larkin (Ordinary Light 336). 

Bondage: The Legacy of Blackness, 400 Years A Slave

updated: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:47am
Department of Humanities at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Over a period of about four centuries, many millions of Africans were shipped to the Americas and forced into slavery. Slavery developed in the colonial period, emerged in the age of the American Revolution, and expanded widely in the antebellum South, reaching its heyday between 1830 and 1860.

A Love Letter to "This Bridge Called My Back"

updated: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 10:00am
Amelia M. Kraehe
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019

A LOVE LETTER TO THIS BRIDGE CALLED MY BACK

Call for Chapter Proposals

Book Overview

The University of Bahamas Critical Caribbean Symposium Series on “African Diasporic Masculinities”

updated: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 9:46am
The University of The Bahamas
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 18, 2019

The University of Bahamas Critical Caribbean Symposium Series on “African Diasporic Masculinities”

Deadline for Submission:

October 18, 2019

Full Name/Name of the Organization:

The University of Bahamas

Contact email:

Ceron.bryant@ub.edu.bs

“African Diasporic Masculinities” sponsored by The University of Bahamas Critical Caribbean Symposium Series

Black Privacy

updated: 
Friday, June 14, 2019 - 1:27pm
The Black Scholar
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Black Privacy

“Here ‘Comes the Colored Hour’: Envisioning Counter-Futures and Diasporic Visions in the Harlem Renaissance Era and Beyond

updated: 
Saturday, June 15, 2019 - 8:10am
Christopher Allen Varlack, Langston Hughes Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 23, 2019

“Here ‘Comes the Colored Hour’: Envisioning Counter-Futures and Diasporic Visions in the Harlem Renaissance Era and Beyond" 

CLA 80 | Theme: Afrofuturism and Diasporic Visions
April 1-4, 2020 at the Hilton Memphis in Memphis, TN 

Call for Chapters: The Wakandan Civitas and its Panthering Futurity

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:39pm
Vernon Press--Academic Peer-Reviewed
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 1, 2019

Vernon Press invites chapter proposals on African History. All areas of study, including disciplines such as Black History Race Studies and Women's & Gender History, among others, are invited to submit.

Black Panther envisions 'Afrotopic' advancement; in other words, it imagines an Afrocentric utopia. This call invites examinations of black civilization as portrayed in various literary forms (novels, graphic novels, films etc). Discussions will be centered around representation of Africa and the African diaspora.

Feeling (Un)American: Race and National Belonging in the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 12:14pm
North East Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In his 1903 The Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois poses a question at the heart of the African-American literary tradition: “How does it feel to be a problem?” We see the question’s precursors in Walker’s Appeal, Douglass’ address on the Fourth of July, and Harper’s anti-slavery poetry. It reverberates in Hurston’s “How It Feels To Be Colored Me,” Ellison’s “black and blue,” Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, and Rankine’s Citizen. Taking up the affective relationship between race and national belonging, these texts ask us to contend with what it feels like to be black in a nation founded on anti-blackness. Indeed, as Baldwin and Coates make clear, the problem lies ever “between the world and me.”

 

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