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Legacies of Trauma: The Tragedy of Before and After

updated: 
Saturday, July 24, 2021 - 7:58am
Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

CALL FOR PAPERS

Legacies of Trauma: The Tragedy of Before and After

Books Available for Review for the Journal for the Study of Radicalism

updated: 
Monday, July 19, 2021 - 5:12pm
Journal for the Study of Radicalism
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 1, 2021

Below is an updated list of texts available for review in The Journal for the Study of Radicalism. Reviewers must be professors, independent scholars, or professionals who hold a PhD or terminal degree in their field. Advanced graduate students are also encouraged to reply.

Email the Book Review Editor at jsrbookreview@gmail.com in order to review a text listed below. We also welcome and encourage ideas on other texts related to radicalism.

Food in American Literature

updated: 
Thursday, July 15, 2021 - 12:22pm
Jeff Birkenstein/Saint Martin's University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021

CFP: Food in American Literature

Proposals due September 1, 2021

UPDATE:

We have accepted about 3/4 of the papers we need for an edited volume on food in American literature. We are seeking a handful of high-quality papers to complete the collection.

OVERVIEW:

Ethics of Witnessing

updated: 
Thursday, July 15, 2021 - 12:22pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

In the aftermath of mass atrocities, where the humanity is both the subject and object of a destructive process, the historical truth is almost impossible to access. On the one hand, perpetrators have tendency to deny their responsibility in committing atrocities, and on the other hand, victims’ experience remains unspeakable due to the impact of trauma. After the Holocaust, researchers from different disciplines focused on the possibility of transmission of the traumatic events related to the atrocities, as well as the obstacles that are faced during this process. One of the interesting areas of research in this regard is the victim-perpetrator encounter and the dynamics of witnessing in relation to the historical truth.

The Black South in the Popular Imagination

updated: 
Thursday, July 15, 2021 - 12:21pm
LaRonda Sanders-Senu
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 20, 2021

In a 2004 interview, author Percival Everett was asked if in his works he was trying to rewrite history.  He candidly responded: “What the hell’s wrong with that? You can write anything you want to. If anybody takes anything they read, history or fiction, as some gospel, then fuck ’em anyway, who cares?

Urban Cultures In Contemporary France

updated: 
Thursday, July 15, 2021 - 12:15pm
Steve Puig
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

NEMLA Convention

Baltimore, MD

March 10-13, 2022

This bilingual panel seeks to analyze the development of urban cultures in France (especially urban literature and music) while taking into account the impact of postcolonial studies in France since 2005, the year of the "urban riots". The panel also aims to explore the political aspect of urban culture as well as the influence of American (especially African-American) culture on French production.

Possible themes include:

“To learn, to teach, to serve, to enjoy”: The Legacy of Julia Ward Howe

updated: 
Thursday, July 8, 2021 - 1:23pm
Boston University/College of General Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 15, 2021

An extraordinary nineteenth-century American woman, Julia Ward Howe was a courageous abolitionist, suffragist, pacifist, poet, public speaker, and founder of many organizations whose purpose was the intellectual and political advancement of women.  To acknowledge and examine this notable woman’s increasingly complicated and fraught legacy a one-day symposium will be held at Boston University’s College of General Studies (CGS) on June 11, 2022, and includes a luncheon with a keynote address by Pulitzer-Prize winning biographer and historian, Megan Marshall.

The symposium is co-sponsored by the Harriet Beecher Stowe Society, Boston University’s College of General Studies (CGS), and CGS’s Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching & Learning.

Neo-Slave Narratives in the 21st Century

updated: 
Thursday, July 8, 2021 - 1:21pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 9, 2021

It has been more than two decades since Ashraf Rushdy published his genre-defining analysis of neo-slave narratives, which argues that literary artists of the 1960s and 70s became interested in creating fictionalized versions of antebellum slave narratives in order to articulate new understandings of Black political subjectivity that developed during the civil rights era. In the decades following the book’s publication, we have seen a surge of antiracist literature and activism aimed at addressing deadly police violence, mass incarceration, and ongoing discrimination in employment, education, healthcare, and housing opportunities for African-American people.

Apocalypse and Utopia in American Literature and Culture (SAMLA 93 Special Session)

updated: 
Saturday, July 3, 2021 - 7:22pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association (93rd Annual Conference)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

This panel seeks to examine the relationship between “apocalypse” and “utopia” in American literature and culture. In the wake of 2020 and its arguably apocalyptic elements, coupled with increased conversations about how these moments of rupture and upheaval might serve as openings for crafting a better world and a better society, this panel welcomes submissions on any aspect or portrayal of the relationship between the apocalyptic and the utopian in American literary and cultural production--novels, short stories, poetry, comics, graphic novels, films, television, etc. How might we understand the relationship between apocalypse and utopia in seeking to form a politics of utopia (and all that phrase might entail)?

CFP (Edited Collection)--Scripting the Past in the Present: Early America and Contemporary Culture

updated: 
Friday, July 2, 2021 - 1:17pm
Dr. Patrick Erben and Dr. Rebecca Harrison
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 3, 2021

CFP for Edited Collection

Scripting the Past in the Present: Early America and Contemporary Culture

 

Editors: Patrick M. Erben and Rebecca L. Harrison

Proposal Deadline: September 3, 2021

 

The editors seek critical and pedagogical essays for a book collection that critically examines the reverberations and re-scripting of early America (its literature, history, art, politics, religion, material culture, public spectacle, monuments, etc.) in contemporary culture.

Understanding WPA Readiness and Renewal

updated: 
Friday, July 2, 2021 - 1:16pm
Joe Janangelo and Mark Blaauw-Hara
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, July 25, 2021

CFP: Understanding WPA Readiness and Renewal 

Editors: Joe Janangelo and Mark Blaauw-Hara

 

Preface

We invite 250-word proposals for a proposed edited collection entitled Understanding WPA Readiness and Renewal. 

CFP Essence & Critique: Journal of Literature and Drama Studies (ISSN: 2791-6553)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 30, 2021 - 10:46pm
Essence & Critique: Journal of Literature and Drama Studies (ISSN: 2791-6553)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Essence & Critique: Journal of Literature and Drama Studies i(2791-6553) nvites submissions for the second issue of the journal - a general issue on Literature and Drama Studies.

Essence & Critique: Journal of Literature and Drama Studies is an open access peer-reviewed academic journal that serves as a forum for multi- and interdisciplinary discussions across Literature and Drama Studies, providing academicians, scholars, professionals, and students with the opportunity to disseminate their research to a diverse audience of peers and professionals.

The second issue aims to cover literary and theatrical works in general.

Ethnic Studies and Youth Literature: A Critical Reader

updated: 
Tuesday, June 29, 2021 - 2:35pm
Dr. Sonia Alejandra Rodriguez/ LaGuardia Community College (CUNY)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 1, 2021

In the last ten years, youth literature, as a US institution, has had a major reckoning with its complicity in systemic racism and oppression. This reckoning has taken place in direct relationship to social justice movements such as Black Lives Matter, Me Too, and We Need Diverse Books, all of which are rooted in communities of color. For example, in my book, Side by Side: US Empire, Puerto Rico and the Roots of American Youth Literature and Culture (UP Mississippi, March 2021), I argue that the study of youth literature in the US was built on a purposeful separation from fields like Ethnic Studies. This was the case despite the fact that youth literature has always been rooted in multiracial, multilingual epistemologies.

Representations of Mental Health and Trauma Care in the Marvel Cinematic Universe

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:03pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

With a growing social consciousness in the contemporary milieu, even large corporations such as Disney have begun to take an activist turn. Of late, Marvel has been especially sensitive to ongoing issues regarding race and gender. This is particularly evident in its latest incarnations available through Disney +: Wandavision and Falcon and the Winter Solider. Accompanying this messaging has also been a positive representation of mental health care and the effects of individual and collective trauma. These are not superheroes who take a beating and walk away unscathed; these are highly developed and nuanced characters whose arcs take shape over several different films and multiple episodes.

The Write Kind of Change: Literature as Social Activism

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 1:52pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Vladimir Nabokov once suggested that any form of reading which pays heightened attention to the socio-political realities of our world, rather than paying exclusive attention to the use of literary devices present in a given text, constitutes a form of “bad reading.” In her 2017 book Paraliterary: The Making of Bad Readers in Postwar America, Merve Emre works to reclaim this form of bad reading, arguing that these so-called bad readers are “literate subjects [who use] reading to navigate a political climate that champion[s] liberal individualism, on the one hand, while establishing unprecedented forms of institutional oversight, on the other” (5).

CFP: HyperCultura- 10/2021

updated: 
Friday, June 25, 2021 - 11:22am
Hyperion University, Romania
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 15, 2021

Dear Colleagues,

We have the pleasure to invite you to submit articles for our next issue of HyperCultura (indexed CEEOL, Ulrichsweb, DOAJ, MLA Director of Periodicals, ERIH PLUS and EBSCO), due March-April 2022. While we will still encourage a comparative approach, though not imposing it, we will welcome papers on nationalism/postnationalism, colonialism/postcolonialism/decolonization, race, gender studies, ethnicity, and identity. The papers should apply any of the above on: literature (not classic), media studies, film studies, visual and performative arts, teaching (language and literature).

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