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Duality and Duplicity in African-American Literature

updated: 
Sunday, June 5, 2016 - 3:52am
Bruce Plourde/Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

The idea that African-Americans are actual and full-fledged citizens of the United States is not a new one; the racism that prevents that idea to flourish is also not new.  Recent events, including the death of Freddie Carlos Gray, Jr. in Baltimore, have brought to the fore the question of whether or not the United States values its black citizens, and extends to them the same rights as it does to its non-black citizens.  The historical record has much to say on this point, but the literary record also is instructive in perceptions of race in the United States. 

NEW ACADEMIA: An International Journal of English Language, Literature and Literary Theory (Print- ISSN 2277-3967) (Online ISSN 2347-2073)

updated: 
Sunday, June 5, 2016 - 3:46am
Interactions Forum Pune
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS

NEW ACADEMIA: An International Journal of English Language, Literature and Literary Theory (ISSN 2277-3967) (PRINT) (Online ISSN 2347-2073)

Vol. V Issue III July 2016

New Academia is a refereed journal published quarterly by Interactions Forum. The Journal strives to publish research work of high quality related to Literature written in English Language across the World, English language and literary theory. The aim of the journal is to give space to scholars and researchers to publish their works.
We are always keen to receive submissions from scholars, academicians and researchers in the form of Research Papers, Articles, Poems, Short Stories, Interviews and Book Reviews.

Going Back to Roots: Revisiting the Groundbreaking Miniseries

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:06pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

The broadcast of the miniseries adaptation of Alex Haley’s Roots, which aired in January of 1977, became a ratings bonanza, a cultural touchstone, and a defining moment in the representation of African Americans in popular media. 40 years later, the impact of Alex Haley’s novel and the ABC miniseries continues to be felt, most notably in the recent History Channel “reboot” of the miniseries, but also in less obvious but more profound ways.

Black Lives Matter--albeit Issue 4.1

updated: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 4:10pm
albeit Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 1, 2016

Issue 4.1: Black Lives Matter

albeit, an innovative, MLA-indexed online journal of scholarship and pedagogy, invites scholarly articles, detailed lesson plans, book reviews, creative pieces, and nonfiction essays exploring the theme of “Black Lives Matter.”

Topics for this issue can include, but are not limited to:

REVISITING RICHARD WRIGHT'S 12 MILLION BLACK VOICES: SAMLA Nov. 4-6, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 4:10pm
Joshua Privett / South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 6, 2016

November 2016 marks the 75th anniversary of Richard Wright's 12 Million Black Voices: A Folk History of the Negro in the United States (1941), a documentary text that juxtaposes Wright's historical analysis of slavery in America with Edwin Rosskam's photographs. This panel seeks to revisit the text from the perspective of recent trends in literary and cultural studies, as well as the conference theme of utopia/dystopia.

THE GOOD LIFE IS OUT THERE SOMEWHERE: UNCOVERING UTOPIA IN THE NINETEENTH-CENTURY CANON

updated: 
Thursday, May 26, 2016 - 9:34am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 9, 2016

Though neither Mr. Thornton nor Mr. Bell evoke “Utopia” flatteringly in Elizabeth Gaskell’s North & South, each mention of the term situates the concept of utopianism at the center of the novel’s labour dispute and makes the reader wonder if Margaret Hale might not be a utopian heroine. Not considered a utopic text, North & South nevertheless engages itself in a conversation about utopianism (and dystopianism). This panel seeks papers re-reading non-utopic texts (or authors) from the nineteenth century as utopic. By June 9th, please submit a 200-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Dan Abitz, Georgia State University, dabitz1@gsu.edu.

Appalachian Nature Writing and Ecocriticism Anthology

updated: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 3:33pm
Jessica Cory
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 1, 2016

Appalachia, with its wealth of biodiversity, has yet to be properly recognized in an anthology that focuses on nature writing and Ecocriticism. This first-ever collection of Appalachian nature writing and schloarly criticism focusing on the Appalchian region and its literature will look at both the natural and post-natural world and the role the Appalachian region plays in such. 

Poetry, creative nonfiction, fiction, one-act plays, and ecocritical essays are welcomed. 

Submission Guidelines

Afrofuturism in Time and Space

updated: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 3:33pm
Isiah Lavender III / Louisiana State University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 30, 2016

Co-editors Isiah Lavender III and Lisa Yaszek seek essays on black speculative art across centuries, continents, and cultures for a new collection called “Afrofuturism in Time and Space.”  When Mark Dery coined the term “Afrofuturism” in 1993 to describe art that explores issues of science, technology, and race from technocultural and science fictional perspectives, he did so primarily in reference to postwar African American art, music, and literature. Over the past decade, however, scholars and artists alike have begun to redefine Afrofuturism, pushing its temporal boundaries back to the 17th-century roots of modern science and industry while expanding its geographic boundaries to include diasporic black and pan-African speculative fictions.

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