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The Next Act: Approaches to the Problem of the Theatre Canon in Undergraduate Education

updated: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019 - 9:40am
Lindsey Mantoan / Linfield College
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

for a new anthology

 

The Next Act: Approaches to the Problem of the Theatre Canon in Undergraduate Education

Co-Editors: Lindsey Mantoan, Matthew Moore, and Angela Farr Schiller

 

Canonicity is not only a list of texts, but a way of thinking about what the texts signify.

- Randy Laist

“The Self-Deconstructing Canon:

Teaching the Survey Course Without Perpetuating Hegemony.”

Currents in Teaching and Learning Vol. 1 No. 2 (2009): 51

 

The Short Story's Global Dimensions - Panel ACLA Chicago

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 3:02pm
Gavin Jones (Stanford), Michael Collins (King's College, London)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

Gavin Jones (Stanford) and Michael Collins (KCL) are seeking contributors for a panel on the "The Short Story's Global Dimensions" at the Annual Meeting of the ACLA in Chicago, 19th - 22nd March 2020. Abstract proposals of around 200 words should be sent to the organisers by August 30th.

 

https://www.acla.org/short-storys-global-dimensions  

 

SSSL 2020: The Uses and Abuses of Shame

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:54pm
Courtney George/ Columbus State University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Society for the Study of Southern Literature (SSSL) 2020: The Uses and Abuses of Shame in the American South

Believing Women in the Late-Nineteenth Century

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:43pm
Arielle Zibrak / University of Wyoming
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 19, 2019

Please consider submitting an abstract for this panel proposal at the 2020 C19 conference in Coral Gables, FL. Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh before the Senate Judiciary Committee in September 2018 helped make “Believe Women” a new rallying cry for the #metoo movement(s). This roundtable will examine the contentious issue of women’s believability during the latter half of the nineteenth century, a time when the credibility of women was also at the forefront of popular consciousness, occasionally heralded but more often interrogated. How did writers and activists push back against the persistent gaslighting of women during the postbellum period?

Octavia Butler and Afrofuturism Edited Collection

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:42pm
Lilith Acadia, Ji Hyun Lee
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019

Seeking final submissions for Octavia Butler’s Afrofuturistic Visions: Reframing Identity, Culture, and History. This edited collection is under contract with Lexington Books and slated for publication in 2020.

 

Call for Chapters - Collected Essays on Teaching African American Texts by White Faculty

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:44pm
Cheryl Boots / Boston University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 16, 2019

Following up the 2019 NeMLA Roundtable “White Allies/Co-conspirators:Teaching African American Literature,” Lexington Books has expressed interest in publishing a collection of essays about white faculty teaching texts by persons of color.

Soundtracks of African American Prose

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:44pm
Cheryl Boots / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

African American works often include references to music that may or may not be recognized by a wide reading audience. For example, the spirituals that Martin Luther King, Jr. chanted in his speeches provide added rhetorical context for his words; yet those who do not know the songs do not have a more nuanced understanding of his oratory. Langston Hughes and James Baldwin both crafted their writing with music in mind. Baldwin acknowledged in the New York Times Book Review that “I…model myself on jazz musicians and try to write the way they sound.”

African American & Latinx Literature Case Studies; Teaching While Privileged

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:15pm
Cheryl Boots / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Privilege comes in many forms whether race, class, gender, or education. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, 84% of full time faculty are white, 25% of those professors are women. With these overarching statistics nationally, at many institutions, classes that focus on African American or Latinx literature are taught largely, if not completely, by faculty who are not from that racial or cultural demographic. When white faculty teach these courses, they may need to confront their own privilege and cultural “blind spots.” Proposed case study presentations can address teaching either African American or Latinx texts.

The Black Arts Movement in the United States and Algeria

updated: 
Saturday, July 27, 2019 - 12:26pm
Faculté des Langues Etrangeres/Université Abd el Hamid Ibn Badis/Algeria
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 30, 2019

International Conference on

“The Black Arts Movement in the United States and Algeria

18-19 November, 2019

 

EXTENDED DEADLINE

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):

I. Segregation and Colonialism

I.1. James Baldwin on Justice/Injustice in the Algerian Context

I.2. Dr. Martin Luther King and Ahmed Ben Bella: “Linking Two Injustices”

I.3. Ben Bella, W. E. Dubois and Pan-Africanism

II. The Emergence of the Black Arts Movement

Hip Hop Ecologies (Workshop and Special Issue)

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 2:09pm
University of Konstanz, Germany
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Hip Hop Ecologies: A Workshop at the University of Konstanz (June 26-28, 2020)

Hip hop is one of the globally most successful forms of cultural production today. Since its emergence in the African American and Latino neighborhoods of 1970s New York City, it has spread around the world and exerted a considerable impact not only on pop culture, but on societal debates around race, class, public safety, nationality, gender, and a range of other issues. The rapidly expanding field of hip hop studies has examined its artistic development and cultural significance from a variety of angles. What has remained almost entirely absent from scholarly debate is the relationship between hip hop and the environment.

2020 C19: Reforming Women

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 1:57pm
Emily Banta / Rutgers University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 16, 2019

Please consider submitting an abstract for this proposed panel for the 2020 C19 conference in Coral Gables.

Reforming Women

Women were powerful activists in a range of nineteenth-century reform movements, agitating for abolition, temperance, prison reform, education reform, and women’s suffrage, to name a few. This panel asks how women’s reform work participated in the practices of dissent and consent, exploring the politics and poetics of nineteenth-century women’s activism. The very term “reform” bridges material change and continuity in the act of making: the work of re-forming involves repetition, revision, and return, which present substantial political possibilities as well as distinct limits.  

Desegregating Comics: Debating Blackness in Early American Comics, 1900-1960

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 1:52pm
Qiana Whitted / University of South Carolina
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Contributions are invited for a collection of original essays that explore race and blackness in American comic books, comic strips, and editorial cartoons from the turn of the twentieth century through the industry’s Golden Age in the 1940s and 1950s. The historical perception of black people in comic art has long been tied to caricatured images of indecipherable minstrels, witch doctors, and brutal savages, yet archives reveal a more racially complex narrative and aesthetic landscape, one that was enriched by the debates among comics artists, writers, editors, and readers about how blackness could be expressed on the page.

Universities Studying Slavery 2019 Fall Symposium “The Academy’s Original Sin”

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 1:33pm
University of Cincinnati/Xavier University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 1, 2019

When: October 9-12, 2019 

Where: Xavier University & The University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 

Xavier University and the University of Cincinnati are proud to co-sponsor the Universities Studying Slavery (USS) Fall 2019 Symposium, entitled “The Academy’s Original Sin.” USS is a multi-institutional collaborative effort working to address historical and contemporary issues dealing with race and inequality in higher education and university communities, and the complicated legacies of slavery in modern American society.  

“Imagined Blackness in Imagined Communities”

updated: 
Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - 12:54pm
DeLisa Hawkes/ U of Maryland, College Park
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

Afrofuturism has become increasingly central to critical conversations about Afro-pessimism, race relations, and cultural histories. This proposed panel draws from Benedict Anderson’s conception of “nation” in his pivotal text Imagined Communities as a generative starting point for thinking about black community formations, black futurity, and cultural histories represented in literature. Anderson claims that “since World War II every successful revolution has defined itself in national terms” (2). However, nations are merely “imagined political communities… as both inherently limited and sovereign” (6).

78-88: Prince, The First Decade: An Interdisciplinary Conference.

updated: 
Friday, July 12, 2019 - 11:06am
Dr Mike Alleyne, Dept. of Recording Industry, College of Media & Entertainment, Middle Tennessee State University. Dr Kirsty Fairclough, School of Arts and Media, University of Salford, UK. Kristen Zschomler, Minneapolis-based historian and writer, Soun
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 3, 2020

78-88: Prince, The First Decade: An Interdisciplinary Conference.

A two-day international conference hosted by The School of Arts and Media, University of Salford, United Kingdom and the Department of Recording Industry, Middle Tennessee State University, USA.

June 3 & 4, 2020, The Robert E. Jones Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center, University of Minnesota, 2001 Plymouth Ave. N., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

Organising Committee:

Dr Mike Alleyne, Dept. of Recording Industry, College of Media & Entertainment, Middle Tennessee State University.

Dr Kirsty Fairclough, School of Arts and Media, University of Salford, UK.

Fantasy, Horror, and the Supernatural

updated: 
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 12:40am
Kate Watt / PAMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 19, 2019

From golems to Gollum, ghosts to Ironman, hobbits to succubi, zombies to dopplegangers, the possessed to those who wield the dark arts, the not-human, the almost-human, the was-human, the wants-to-be-human, the beyond-human, and those who use unknown powers to prey on humans have populated human culture and narrative from the beginning. Analysis from any critical perspective, exploring texts drawn from literature, film/TV, graphic novels, manga, comics, visual arts, and elsewhere, is welcome.

Us, Get Out, The Walking Dead, Cthulhu, It, and a wide variety of other texts would be appropriate topics. 

Please submit through the PAMLA.org website directly. 

PAMLA is in San Diego, November 14-17, 2019. 


MODERNIST STRUCTURES, 24-27 June 2020, Université Caen Normandie

updated: 
Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - 10:46am
Société d'études modernistes (SEM)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 10, 2019

 

MODERNIST STRUCTURES 

The Fourth International Conference of the French Society for Modernist Studies
Société d’études modernistes (SEM) https://sem-france.parisnanterre.fr 

24-27 June 2020   Université Caen Normandie

In collaboration with:
ERIBIA (Université Caen Normandie)
Musée des Beaux-Arts Caen
Institut mémoires de l’édition contemporaine (IMEC)
CREA (Université Paris Nanterre)

NeMLA 2020: The Politics of ‘Post’ in American Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - 3:00am
Meghan Burns and Kelly Mahaffy, University of Connecticut
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In a 2009 article in American Literary History, Richard Gray critiqued the production of post-9/11 novels, writing that such literary works “simply assimilate the unfamiliar into familiar structures.” Yet scholarly work on contemporary U.S. fiction seems to return again and again to a focus on literary production in terms of its relationship to the 2001 tragedy. In this panel, we seek to interrogate the way the concept of “post” has come to influence and, perhaps, even define the American literary canon. 

The Rebellious Postbellum

updated: 
Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - 3:34pm
Tim Bruno / C19
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019

The Rebellious Postbellum

The Erasure of Subject: Postmodern Reflections

updated: 
Saturday, July 6, 2019 - 8:14am
Nikita Goel, Editor/ Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies (LLIDS)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 15, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies (LLIDS), an academic journal, invites original and unpublished research papers from scholars on the following:

The Erasure of Subject: Postmodern Reflections

The whole history of social sciences—and even more of natural sciences—could be summed up as the elimination of the concept of the subject. - Alain Tourain

Chinua Achebe's No Longer at Ease at 60 (for Northeast Modern Language Association 5-8 March 2020)

updated: 
Monday, June 24, 2019 - 12:39am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

As Chinua Achebe's second novel, No Longer at Ease, first published in 1960, arrives at its 60th anniversary, scholars have an opportunity to reassess its significance not only for African literature, but also for world literature in general. The story is set in the 1950's and richly depicts the cultural tensions of African societies nearing independence from Great Britain. It forecasts both the optimism and the disappointment that would characterize post-independence Africa. In dramatizing the fortunes of the Okonkwo family in rural Nigeria and Lagos, No Longer at Ease forms a sequel to Achebe's first and most famous novel, Things Fall Apart (1958), but is not as widely read and discussed as its predecessor.

Bondage: The Legacy of Blackness, 400 Years A Slave

updated: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:47am
Department of Humanities at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Over a period of about four centuries, many millions of Africans were shipped to the Americas and forced into slavery. Slavery developed in the colonial period, emerged in the age of the American Revolution, and expanded widely in the antebellum South, reaching its heyday between 1830 and 1860.

Reading Politics and Art in the Poetry of Tracy K. Smith (NEMLA 2020 Panel)

updated: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:12am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

CFP for the 51st Annual NEMLA Conference in Boston, Massachusetts, March 5 - 8, 2019

Tracy K. Smith, with four books of poetry, a volume of memoirs, a Pulitzer Prize and two stints as America's poet laureate, has every claim to be a major American poet at the pinnacle of success. It is easy to dwell on the mainstream acceptance that this success has earned. Her work is often described in highly aesthetic language, with an emphasis on its beauty and craft, and she sits neatly in the American poetic tradition. Among those poets she considers “most necessary” she invokes Seamus Heaney, Elizabeth Bishop, and Philip Larkin (Ordinary Light 336). 

A Love Letter to "This Bridge Called My Back"

updated: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 10:00am
Amelia M. Kraehe
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019

A LOVE LETTER TO THIS BRIDGE CALLED MY BACK

Call for Chapter Proposals

Book Overview

25th AISNA Biennial Conference Gate(d)Ways. Enclosures, Breaches and Mobilities Across U.S. Boundaries and Beyond

updated: 
Monday, June 17, 2019 - 10:41am
Italian Association for North American Studies (AISNA)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, June 25, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Paper  proposals  (max.  300  words)  should  be  submitted,  together  with  a  brief biographical note, to the Panel Coordinator(s), to the Conference Organizer Gigliola Nocera (noceragi@unict.it) and to the Aisna Secretary Simone Francescato (segretario- aisna@unive.it) by June 15, 2019. Successful proponents will be notified by June 30,

2019. Panels exceeding four participants will be split into two sessions.

 

Panel # 1

 

Black Privacy

updated: 
Friday, June 14, 2019 - 1:27pm
The Black Scholar
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Black Privacy

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