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Modernist Short Stories Writers

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 10:12am
Kay Boyle Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 13, 2019

Modernist Short Stories Writers

Sponsored by the Kay Boyle Society

The American Short Story: New Considerations

New Orleans, Sep. 5-7, 2019

 

Many modernist writers experimented with the short story genre early in their careers, while reading, publishing and critiquing each other’s work in small magazines.

The objective of this panel is to engage in comparative, reflective conversation, bringing out as yet unnoticed similarities and convergence in themes, writing practices, and subjectivities among these writers.

This panel invites papers on the work of one writer or in the context of other writers, on one or more of the following themes:

Religion in American Literature (San Diego, CA; Nov. 14-17, 2019)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 9:19am
Pacific Ancient & Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 10, 2019

This session examines the relationship between religion and American literature. In particular, it welcomes papers that explore the topic of theodicy in contemporary American literature. How have the events following 9/11, and the developments in post-secular and trauma studies made the question of theodicy a more vital, urgent topic in our contemporary moment? How has 9/11 transformed the ways in which Americans think about the problem of evil? How has this event and other acts of terror influenced our cultural imaginations of suffering and death? How have contemporary American writers contributed to the conversations about the presence or absence of God in suffering?

Decolonizing the Digital Archive

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 9:19am
25th AISNA Biennial Conference Gate(d)Ways. Enclosures, Breaches and Mobilities Across U.S. Boundaries and Beyond (Ragusa, Italy, September 26-28, 2019)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 15, 2019

Decolonizing the Digital Archive

 

In recent years we have witnessed a proliferation of digital archival work – often (but not always) in the form of open access platforms developed to gather, preserve, and share historical documents. The very nature of open accessibility counters a rhetoric of retreat and the construction of barriers among knowledge producers and consumers – by refusing ownership over its content and seeking collaborative and communal engagement in both interpretational and curatorial work, open access digital archives are often decentralized archives that  provide modes for democratic access, exchange, and co-construction of knowledge.

Signs Special Issue: RAGE

updated: 
Friday, May 24, 2019 - 1:40pm
Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Feminists are raging.  This special issue will consider our rage as a global, complex phenomenon that mandates interdisciplinary and intersectional analysis. Rage is historical. Rage can be deeply exclusionary, recognizable as a legitimate emotion for only a privileged few. It is an instrument of patriarchy as well as a potential feminist resource. Rage shapes moral claims for racial justice, movements against gender violence, and opposition to the global rise of authoritarian regimes.  Rage can do so in ways that both extend and depart from the histories of feminist and queer raging that marked late-twentieth-century radical feminism, global organizing against HIV/AIDS, and against police brutality.

Mapping “No-Place”: Geographical Fantasy in Nineteenth-Century America

updated: 
Friday, May 24, 2019 - 12:13pm
Ashley Rattner and Ryan Charlton
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 1, 2019

Remapping is inherently an act of dissent. As Denis N. Cosgrove observes, “The measure of mapping is not restricted to the mathematical; it may be equally spiritual, political, or moral. By the same token, the mapping’s record is not confined to the archival; it includes the remembered, the imagined, and the contemplated.” What role do illusory places––literary utopias, hoaxes, legends, visions, and other fictions––play in critiquing, reinforcing, or challenging mainstream American culture in the nineteenth century? This proposed panel explores aspirational, deceptive, and fantastical spaces which throw the existing world into relief to propose plausible and potent alternative microcosms.

Pop South: Translating the Region

updated: 
Friday, May 24, 2019 - 12:12pm
SAMLA / South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019

November 15-17, 2019 | Westin Peachtree Plaza | Atlanta, GA

African American and Native American Women Writers

updated: 
Monday, May 20, 2019 - 1:52pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 3, 2019

African American and Native American Women Writers

 

SAMLA 2019

Atlanta, GA

Westin Peachtree Plaza

November 15-17

 

New Criticism and Pedagogical Directions for Contemporary Black Women Writers

updated: 
Tuesday, May 14, 2019 - 8:51pm
LaToya Jefferson-James, Southwest Tennessee Community College
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 15, 2019

Call for Papers

Tentative TitleNew Criticism and Pedagogical Directions for Contemporary Black Women Writers

Editor: LaToya Jefferson-James, Ph.D.

Publisher: Lexington Books, a wholly owned subsidiary of Littlefield & Rowan Publishers

Deadline for submissions:  June 15, 2019

Decision Date: July 15, 2019

Email: blackwomenwritershome@gmail.com

 

Religion in American Literature (San Diego, CA; Nov. 14-17, 2019)

updated: 
Tuesday, May 14, 2019 - 2:15pm
Pacific Ancient & Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 10, 2019

This session examines the relationship between religion and American literature. In particular, it welcomes papers that explore the topic of theodicy in contemporary American literature. How have the events following 9/11, and the developments in post-secular and trauma studies made the question of theodicy a more vital, urgent topic in our contemporary moment? How has 9/11 transformed the ways in which Americans think about the problem of evil? How has this event and other acts of terror influenced our cultural imaginations of suffering and death? How have contemporary American writers contributed to the conversations about the presence or absence of God in suffering?

ZOUK: DIASPORIC TRAJECTORIES, IMAGINATIONS AND PERSPECTIVES

updated: 
Monday, May 13, 2019 - 1:11pm
University of the French West-Indies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, May 30, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

ZOUK!
DIASPORIC TRAJECTORIES, IMAGINATIONS AND PERSPECTIVES

Zouk stands out as the complex and intricate artistic creation of Guadeloupe and Martinique, two sister islands that have conjointly gone through irreparable convulsions, collective devastation and a lengthy reconstruction of their identities during French colonial history.

Young Scholars Competition: Theatre/Drama

updated: 
Wednesday, May 1, 2019 - 11:57am
Black Theatre Network
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 15, 2019

S. Randolph Edmonds Young Scholars Competition

In recognition of Black Theatre scholar and educator, S. Randolph Edmonds, The Black Theatre Network instituted the S. Randolph Edmonds Young Scholars Competition in 1988.

This competition seeks to encourage research and scholarship in Black Theatre. The competition supports the overall mission of BTN: to expose the beauty and complexity of the inherited theatre work of our African American ancestors as well as preserve and develop Black Theatre’s unique art form. 

 

REQUIREMENTS 

SAMLA 91 General Call for Papers

updated: 
Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 11:04am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 15, 2019

General Call for Papers

SAMLA invites prospective conference participants to submit abstracts to our annual General Call for Papers. The General Call will be used to build programming from accepted abstracts that did not resonate with any of our currently published CFPs. 

Abstracts will be reviewed internally, and accepted abstracts will either be placed on an extant panel or combined with other General Call abstracts to create new sessions. Unfortunately, we cannot guarantee acceptance and placement, though we will work earnestly and diligently to place all abstracts.

A Connecticut Abolitionist in King Arthur’s Court: Harriet Beecher Stowe’s British Reception

updated: 
Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 11:00am
Jude V. Nixon
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

For the Northeast Modern Language Association’s (NeMLA’s) 51th Annual Conference, 5-4 March 2020, in Boston, MA, Shaping and Sharing Identities: Spaces, Places, Languages, and Cultures, this session is seeking proposals addressing the topic, A Connecticut Abolitionist in King Arthur’s Court: Harriet Beecher Stowe’s British Reception. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s radical views on slavery in Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) took the western world by storm. Nowhere was the response more impassioned than in Great Britain.

Writing in the Breaks: Black Rhetorics and Rupture

updated: 
Tuesday, April 23, 2019 - 3:56pm
SAMLA--November 15-17 Atlanta, GA--DEADLINE EXTENDED
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 1, 2019

In theorizing the break in black radical aesthetics, Fred Moten suggests, "Words don't go there [in Cecil Taylor's Chinampas]. Is it only music, only sound that goes there? Perhaps these notes and phrases will have mapped the terrain and traversed (at least some of) the space between here and there" (In the Break, 42). Moten claims that black radical aesthetics enact a generative rupture, break, or cut that create space for black aesthetic practices. This panel will consider any theorization of rupture or the break in black expressive practices with a special consideration of papers that address the break between black musical and literary practices.

SAMLA 91 (Nov. 15-17, 2019, in Atlanta, GA): Silenced Masculinities

updated: 
Tuesday, April 23, 2019 - 2:37am
Gene Melton and Catherine Mainland / NC State University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, May 9, 2019

This panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of masculinities that have been left on the margins of mainstream literary narratives, pop culture, and scholarship, including but not limited to: race, class, and/or privilege; body integrity, aesthetics, age, and/or health; masculine relationships and roles; and sexuality. Proposals addressing the conference theme of “Languages: Power, Identity, and Relationships” are especially welcome. By Thursday 9th May 2019, please submit an abstract of up to 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Dr. Catherine Mainland, NC State University, at cmmainla@ncsu.edu, and Dr.

2019 SCMLA African American Literature Regular Session

updated: 
Monday, April 22, 2019 - 2:36pm
Stewart Habig / The University of Tulsa
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 31, 2019

EXTENDED DEADLINE - MAY 5, 2019

Call for Papers

African American Literature, Regular Session,

South Central Modern Language Association Conference, Oct 24-26, 2019

Gate(d)Ways. Enclosures, Breaches and Mobilities Across U.S. Boundaries and Beyond

updated: 
Sunday, April 21, 2019 - 9:45am
AISNA - Italian Association for North American Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 10, 2019

25th AISNA Biennial Conference

University of Catania, Ragusa, September 26-28, 2019

 

Keynote speakers: prof. José David Saldívar (Stanford University)
prof. Ira Dworkin (Texas A&M University)
prof. Erika Lee (University of Minnesota)
prof. Paola Boi (University of Cagliari)

Call for Panels

Digital Humanities Forum 2019: Bodies, Justice, Futures

updated: 
Wednesday, April 17, 2019 - 4:27pm
Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities, University of Kansas
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, May 20, 2019

Now in its ninth year, the Digital Humanities Forum brings together faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students to celebrate and explore digital scholarship as a diverse and growing field of humanist inquiry. The Digital Humanities Forum 2019, presented by the Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities (IDRH), will take place in Lawrence, KS, October 3-4, 2019 at the Burge Union at the University of Kansas. Visit our website for more details: http://idrh.ku.edu/dhforum2019

Not Just Clowning Around: Blackface Yesterday and Today

updated: 
Saturday, April 13, 2019 - 11:48pm
PAMLA November 14-17, 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 10, 2019

As recent events in Virginia demonstrated, blackface minstrelsy is far from being a thing of the past. Despite its taboo status and overtly racist underpinnings, blackface continues to happen. In his seminal work on the phenomenon, Eric Lott argued that early blackface minstrelsy emerged out of the “intersection of slave culture and earlier blackface stage characters such as the…clown of English pantomime and the clown of the American circus.” What might this lineage tell us about the ongoing prevalence and relevance of blackface? This session invites proposals that consider and examine modern and past manifestations of blackface minstrelsy, its legacies, and its influence.

Panel on Contemporary American Motherhood - PAMLA 2019, San Diego

updated: 
Thursday, April 11, 2019 - 1:43pm
Megan Cannella/Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 10, 2019

PAMLA 2019

San Diego, CA

November 14-17

This panel seeks to explore the ways in which motherhood, in all its stages, across all demographics, is represented in contemporary American literature.

Call for Chapter Proposals - Anti-heroines of Contemporary Literary Media, Television, and Cinema

updated: 
Wednesday, April 10, 2019 - 10:32am
Melanie Haas/Texas Woman's University, N.A. Pierce/Old Dominion University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 21, 2019

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS

A volume of scholarly essays to be collected under the title:

Bitch or Badass: Anti-heroines of Contemporary Literary Media, Television, and Cinema (working title)

Edited by Melanie A. Haas (Texas Woman's University ) and N. A. Pierce (Old Dominion University)

Intellectuals Across Borders: Writers, Artists, Activists

updated: 
Tuesday, April 9, 2019 - 9:55am
University of Münster, Germany and University of Lisbon, Portugal
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, April 15, 2019

Across Europe, the critical engagement with the history of colonialism and its significant ongoing legacies has gained purchase – not least because of the critique, pressure, and demands of postcolonial intellectuals from, or with ties to, Africa, the Caribbean, and Asia. Matters of postcolonial justice, such as reparations to former European colonies, the restitution of human remains and cultural artefacts, and calls for the removal of national symbols and monuments that reproduce racist ideology have gained increased public attention in recent years.

DEADLINE EXTENDED--Multicultural Literature in the Windy City, Midwest MLA, November 14-17, 2019, Chicago, IL

updated: 
Monday, April 8, 2019 - 9:56pm
Christina Triezenberg/Midwest Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 19, 2019

This year's MMLA conference theme of "Duality, Doubles, and Doppelgangers" offers a wealth of possibilities to explore the complex relationships that minority and immigrant communities have within the larger culture of the United States, as well as the ways in which literary texts communicate the realities of their experiences to a wider audience, particularly when they are introduced in the classroom.  With this in mind, the Multicultural Literature in the Classroom section seeks papers that explore the often conflicted relationships that minorities and immigrants have with the communities around them, as well as the ways in which minority and immigrant populations enrich and strengthen the communities of which they are apart, even as they strive to main

Consent: Histories, Representations, and Frameworks for the Future

updated: 
Thursday, April 4, 2019 - 4:43pm
Sophie Franklin, Durham University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 17, 2019

CONSENT:

Histories, Representations, and Frameworks for the Future

5 and 6 August 2019, Josephine Butler College, Durham University

 

‘[S]aying no when no feels right is something to be proud of.’

– Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

 

‘Our claim […] is a claim for the rights of all.’

– Josephine Butler

 

MMLA Permanent Sessions on Global Film

updated: 
Thursday, April 4, 2019 - 1:33pm
Bowling Green State University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, April 15, 2019

Film III: Global Film for the Midwest Modern Language Association Meeting in November 14-17 in Chicago

The permanent session on Global Cinema seeks papers that address any aspect of the conference theme of "Duality, Doubles, and Dopplegangers."  We have two wider topic areas around this broader theme.  Please feel free to send abstracts for one or both topics:

Double Talk: Dialect, Multilingualism, and Coded Language in American Literature

updated: 
Thursday, April 4, 2019 - 1:27pm
Andy Harper / Midwest Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, April 29, 2019

In Strange Talk (1999), Gavin Jones argues the ambivalence of late-nineteenth-century American texts’ incorporation of accents, dialects, and foreign tongues, suggesting its tendency both to reinforce and to resist white hegemonic control of the English language. Writing around a decade earlier, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. (1988), Houston A. Baker (1987), Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari (1986) theorize the radically subversive and “deterritorializing” politics of African American English. Today, American writers Junot Díaz and Esmé Waijun Wang incorporate untranslated Spanish and Chinese, respectively, into their work. This session invites papers exploring the politics of dialect, multilingualism, and coded language in American literature.

Heroes, Villains, and Victims: Hagiography, Demonization, and Narrative's Role in Assessing Who Matters

updated: 
Thursday, April 4, 2019 - 1:24pm
Midwest Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, April 15, 2019

Literature and history are rife with figures who are difficult to assess. For example, the television show Dexter was premised on the question of whether or not a murderer who only kills other murderers is a villain or a dark hero. Likewise, both historians and authors have attempted to determine whether John Brown was a hero, a terrorist, a victim, or a madman? Similarly, depending on the perspective from which he is analyzed, Che Guevara was a heroic revolutionary, a violent executioner, or, perhaps, a bit of both? Was Bertha Mason the madwoman in the attic as Charlotte Bronte would have us believe or a victim of the forces of both colonialization and patriarchy as Jean Rhys describes?

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