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Monuments - DEADLINE EXTENDED

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2018 - 8:31am
Nordic Association for American Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

 

The Biennial Conference of the Nordic Association for American Studies

25 – 27 April 2019 in Bergen, Norway

Submission deadline extended: 1 Nov. 2018

 

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Race and Versification in Anglophone Poetry

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:51pm
NeMLA (March 21-24, 2019; Washington D.C.)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Race and Versification in Anglophone Poetry

Studies of versification tend to be silent on race, and with some exceptions (such as Anthony Reed’s 2014 Freedom Time), studies of race and poetic form tend to turn away from the mechanics of versification. As Dorothy Wang argues in Thinking its Presence: Race and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (2014), most accounts of poetic form revolve around the technical accomplishments of white poets, while minority figures are seen as more valuable for their poetry’s social or thematic content. What would happen if nonwhite poets were read for their proficiency with poetic forms, and were made the center of conversations about poetic technique? 

Quaring Childhood

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:41pm
south: a scholarly journal
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

CFP: Quaring Childhood

 

south: a scholarly journal invites submissions for “Quaring Childhood,” a special issue guest edited by Katherine Henninger, to be published in Spring 2019. This issue brings several fields that have developed substantially in the past two decades—childhood studies, critical race studies, queer theory, and new southern studies—into dialogue.

 

NeMLA Panel on James Baldwin's Global Legacy

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:24pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

NeMLA; Washington DC; March 21-24, 2019

 

Disillusioned by the racial issues in America, James Baldwin moved to France in 1948. Nine years later, however, he was drawn back after seeing a photograph of Dorothy Counts, a young black girl in Charlotte, North Carolina being harassed by a white mob as she entered an all-white high school. They threw rocks, spat on her, and told her to go back to where she came from. The image and situation were significant for Baldwin for various reasons. First, despite his attempts to avoid American racism, it had found him in Paris. Second, it was as if the taunts of "go back to where you came from" to Dorothy Counts drew Baldwin back "home" to document and confront American racism head on.

American Postmemory: Slavery in Black and White

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 1:04pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Recognizing that the New World economy was historically based on the system of slavery and that the United States came into being as a slave-holding nation, we experience the lasting effects of slavery in all facets of contemporary US society and culture. This panel seeks papers analyzing contemporary representations of slave history from the black and white perspectives. While we are very familiar with African American representations of slavery in a number of cultural media, this panel is particularly interested in how contemporary representations of slavery created by people of European descent differ from those of African Americans. How is slavery remembered differently in black and white?

REMINDER: Bitter Critique, Emphatic Rebellion: The Politics of Writing While Black (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Saturday, September 8, 2018 - 10:22am
Cynthia Cravens/University of Maryland Eastern Shore
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Conference: Washington, D.C., March 21-24, 2019

Abstract deadline: Sept 30, 2018

Riffing off Du Bois ("Criteria of Negro Art"), Wright ("Blueprint for Negro Writing"), Lorde ("Poetry is not a Luxury"), Baraka ("Black Art"), and many others, this panel seeks to situate, examine, interrogate, and align black writers in American literature and culture. Our objective is to define the many ways black/African American/Negro/Slave writers have characterized or fictionalized what it “means” to be a writer of color.

Bearing Witness: Reading James Baldwin in the 21st Century (A Critical Anthology)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:25pm
Yasmin Y. DeGout, Howard University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 2, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

Bearing Witness: Reading James Baldwin in the 21st Century

(A Critical Anthology)

“Perhaps I did not succumb to ideology . . . because I have never seen myself as a spokesman. I am a witness. In the church in which I was raised you were supposed to bear witness to the truth. Now, later on, you wonder what in the world the truth is, but you do know what a lie is.”—James Baldwin, Interview by Julius Lester

 

In the thick of it: a study of hair and its intersections with identity, politics, and culture.

updated: 
Wednesday, September 5, 2018 - 4:58pm
Darina Pugacheva/Louisiana State University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 20, 2018

Hair as a source of a serious study and research is often trivialized and overlooked. The Foreword to the volume entitled Hair: Styling, Culture and Fashion (2008) expresses the idea that “hair [has] exciting and diverse potential as an academic topic […], so critical analysis of its practice and experience provides a fascinating and engaging entry point to contemporary debates around the body and its fashioning” (ix).  It calls for “a serious approach” to hair, as “a subject area richly deserving of new research” (ix).  Indeed, hair is an exciting field of research that recently, mostly due to the rise of fashion and hairstyles of African diaspora, has started to get more recognition.

Call for Archival and Bibliographical Articles on all periods of American Literature

updated: 
Friday, August 3, 2018 - 9:11am
*Resources for American Literary Study* (Penn State UP)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, December 1, 2018

contact email: ethifault@springfieldcollege.edu 

Resources for American Literary Study, a peer-reviewed journal of archival and bibliographical scholarship, is inviting submissions for upcoming volumes 41.1 and 41.2 (2019). Covering all periods of American literature, Resources for American Literary Study welcomes both traditional and digital humanities approaches to archival discovery and bibliography. The journal also welcomes pedagogically focused submissions examining archival study in the classroom.

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