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2020 AALCS CFP

updated: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019 - 3:27pm
African American Literature and Culture Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 10, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

African American Literature and Culture Society

American Literature Association

31stAnnual Conference

May 21-24, 2020Manchester Grand Hyatt
One Market Place
San Diego, CA

 

 

 
The African American Literature and Culture Society invites abstracts (of no more than 250 words) for presentations at the annual conference of the American Literature Association (http://americanliteratureassociation.org/). We will also consider a limited number of panel proposals (of no more than 500 words).  

 

Emerson Society at the ALA May 2020

updated: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019 - 3:26pm
Ralph Waldo Emerson Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 10, 2020

The Ralph Waldo Emerson Society will sponsor two panels at the annual meeting of the American Literature Association, to be held May 21-24, 2020, San Diego, USA.

 

‘Emerson and Resistance’*

The Emerson Society invites proposals on the topic of ‘Emerson and Resistance’. Papers might like to consider the idea of resistance in Emerson in his own time, in subsequent periods, or in contemporary contexts. Emersonian resistance may also be considered in relation to other writers, political thinkers and philosopher’s.

 

‘Emerson’s Society and Solitude at 150’*

SEASECS 2020-- Deadline Extended!

updated: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019 - 2:34pm
South-Eastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

46TH ANNUAL MEETING OF SEASECS
FEBRUARY 20-22, 2020
MACON, GA

http://www.seasecs.org/2020-conference

SEASECS will hold its 46th annual meeting at the Macon Marriott City Center. The theme for this year's meeting is "Encounters in the 18th Century: Maps, Materials, and Media." In addition to panels and plenary sessions, special events include tours to historic sites including the Ocmulgee Indian Mounds National Historic Park, the 1869 Hay House, the Tubman Museum, historic Rose Hill Cemetery, and the Allman Brothers’ “Big House.” Host institutions include Georgia College & State University, Middle Georgia State University, and Wesleyan College.

Teaching Black and Brown Childhood: Race, Ethnicity, and Young Adult Novels the Classroom

updated: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019 - 2:14pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In the midst of the election of the Trump administration, the growing racial tensions that coalesced into the violent protests in Charlottesville, and the rising rates of hate crimes committed against black and brown individuals, there has been a slew of young adult novels published by writers of color that tackle the ways in which young people within these communities must simultaneously navigate the complexities of childhood while also confronting racism, xenophobia, homophobia, and police brutality.

*DEADLINE EXTENDED* NeMLA 2020: Suspicion Today

updated: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019 - 1:26pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 7, 2019

In the wake of the recent Postcritical Turn in literary studies, a pall has been cast over suspicious modes of analysis. Eve Sedgwick famously sought to move away from the paranoid imperative towards a more reparative relation; Sharon Best and Stephen Marcus have proposed surface reading as an antidote to symptomatic methodology; and, more recent still, Rita Felski has underscored the banality of suspicious hermeneutics as a central premise in her circumscription of the limits of critique.

SSSL 2020: Beyond Borders, Bars, and Binaries in Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing

updated: 
Monday, September 30, 2019 - 8:12pm
Amber P. Hodge
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 11, 2019

In recent years Jesmyn Ward’s workhas received significant critical attention for its stark depiction of race, class, and gender dynamics through Bois Sauvage, microcosm of a rural South typically marginalized in the US imaginary. However, her most recent novel, Sing, Unburied, Sing, while still deeply invested in a specific, southern time and place, engages with peripheries in which these categories are constructed. Where does life intersect with death, sickness clash with health, or freedom meet incarceration?

Toni Morrison: The Emancipation Proclamation of the English Language

updated: 
Wednesday, September 25, 2019 - 4:41pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 4, 2019

In the documentary, The Pieces I Am by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, David Carrasco calls Toni Morrison, “the Emancipation Proclamation of the English language.” The parallelism he conjures between the historical document and grandeur that is Morrison hints at the idea that she could do what Abraham Lincoln’s indenture could not: Toni Morrison frees black people from fake identities. Laced with the assurance that if others knew what she knows,—that prejudice exists in a hyperreality created by those who need it in order to define their purpose—black people will not accept perceived realities as their own; that their lives have meaning, and their stories can take center stage.

War Memories: From the military to the Civilians

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 4:23pm
Le Mans University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 20, 2020

War narratives are subject to emphases, orientations and points of view that give a particular flavour to wars fought by populations (anonymously, individually and/or hidden in an organisation, secret or not)  and by the military (from high command to the ‘unknown soldier’). Such accounts evolve with the benefit of hindsight, the writing of history textbooks and the constant (re)interpretations of archives (new or not) and the official version a country wishes to put forward according to its political agendas and visions of patriotism, citizenship and human rights, or its diplomatic or international policy objectives.

Beyond Ruination: Climate Change and Contemporary Caribbean Novels

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 3:30pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Caribbean authors have the challenge of narrating stories which can encompass the histories of genocide, slavery, indentured labor and colonialism. Alejo Carpentier, in his introduction to The Kingdom of This World (1949), is inspired by the ruins of the Sans-Souci Palace in Haiti, to imagine, in the ruination of the colonial past, a miraculous new future. His ideas spawned a genre that helped formerly colonized peoples decolonize by revaluing formerly subjugated knowledges.

ALA Symposium on American Poetry

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 1:49pm
Richard Flynn/American Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 10, 2019

Call for Papers
American Literature Association Symposium “American Poetry”
February 20-22, 2020 Keynote Speaker:
Aldon Lynn Nielsen
Pennsylvania State University

ALA symposia provide opportunities for scholars to meet in pleasant settings, present papers, and share ideas and resources.  The February 2020 symposium will focus on American poetry. While we welcome individual proposals, panels and roundtable discussions are also encouraged.

Speculative World-Makings: The Environment and Human-Nonhuman Encounters in 21st.C Postcolonial Literary Imaginations

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 1:16pm
ACLA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 23, 2019

Postcolonial literary and cultural traditions have been always curious about worldmaking with nonhumans. In their introduction to Postcolonial Ecologies: Literatures of the Environment (2011), Elizabeth M. DeLoughrey and George B. Handley highlight how environmental elements and nonhuman characters have been key witnesses to the injustices of colonialism, globalization, and neo-liberal forms of violence in postcolonial fiction and non-fiction.

Feeling (Un)American: Race and National Belonging in the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:55am
North East Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In his 1903 The Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois poses a question at the heart of the African-American literary tradition: “How does it feel to be a problem?” We see the question’s precursors in Walker’s Appeal, Douglass’ address on the Fourth of July, and Harper’s anti-slavery poetry. It reverberates in Hurston’s “How It Feels To Be Colored Me,” Ellison’s “black and blue,” Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, and Rankine’s Citizen. Taking up the affective relationship between race and national belonging, these texts ask us to contend with what it feels like to be black in a nation founded on anti-blackness. Indeed, as Baldwin and Coates make clear, the problem lies ever “between the world and me.”

 

Global Conference on Women and Gender Playreading

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:46am
Christopher Newport University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Christopher Newport University’s

College of Arts and Humanities seeks 45-minute scripts or excerptsfor the forthcoming conference on the

Global Conference on Women and Gender 

to be held at CNU, March 19-21, 2020

 

Scripts should engage with the theme of the conference (see below).

The script will be presented as a staged reading followed by a response which includes the playwright as well as additional scholar/artists who can speak to the themes of the work, specific date TBD.

 

NeMLA Panel: 'The New Lost Generation': African American Expatriate Writers in Paris, 1945-60

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:45am
Courtney Mullis, Duquesne University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

NeMLA 2020: Boston, MA

http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

In his 1961 essay “The New Lost Generation,” James Baldwin argues that Europe gave the “new” African American expats of the late 1940s and the 1950s “the sanction, if one can accept it, to become oneself. No artist can survive without this acceptance. But rare indeed is the American artist who achieved this without first becoming a wanderer, and then, upon his return to his own country, the loneliest and most blackly distrusted of men.” Indeed, Baldwin asserts that African American expats in Paris gained a kind of liberation through their experience with a culture wholly unlike their own.

UPDATE: National Society for Minorities in Honors - Annual Conference

updated: 
Sunday, September 22, 2019 - 11:05am
National Society for Minorities in Honors
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

National Society for Minorities in Honors 4th Annual National Conference

Thursday, October 24 through Saturday, October 26, 2019

Hosted by the California State University, Fullerton (CSUF) University Honors Program in collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI) Campuswide Honors Program

2019 Theme
Equity, Justice, and UnderRepresented Students in Honors Education

CFP - DEADLINE EXTENDED TO OCTOBER 1 2019

"How many more?"//Schizophrenia & Capitalism Part II//Literary & Political Responses to|from 1970

updated: 
Saturday, September 21, 2019 - 3:11pm
Northeast Modern Language Association/ Michael Antonucci
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

NEW DEADLINE.

Our Round Table at the 2020 Northeast Modern Language Association Convention in Boston assembles elements of these literary dialogues and brings them into conversation with cultural conversations that emerged as a new decade began a half-century ago, in 1970.

Beyond Borders, Walls, and Binaries: Creating Inclusive Classroom Spaces

updated: 
Wednesday, September 18, 2019 - 9:41am
Society for the Study of Southern Literature's Emerging Scholars Organization
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Panel Proposal for the SSSL Biennial Conference in Fayatteville, AR (February 20-23, 2020)

Sponsored by the Society for the Study of Southern Literature’s Emerging Scholars Organization

Chair: Elizabeth Gardner, Louisiana State University 

NeMLA 2020: Afro-diasporic Futures Before Afrofuturism (Boston, March 5-8)

updated: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019 - 10:00am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Panel: Afro-diasporic Futures Before Afrofuturism

Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Conference

March 5-8, 2020 

Boston, MA

 

Seeking papers on the politics of futurity in Afro-diasporic writing from before the mid-twentieth century for the following guaranteed session at NeMLA 2020. Abstracts due by September 30 on NeMLA's website. Visit https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/17890 to submit.

Black Men, White Publishers (NeMLA Panel)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019 - 11:56am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In November 2018, The New York Times published “Black Male Writers for Our Time,” an article that highlights some of the African-American male writers who have won prestigious awards in recent years. For instance, Gregory Pardlo won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 2015, while Colson Whitehead won the National Book Award in 2016 and the Pulitzer in 2017. In 2018, Kendrick Lamar made history as the first rapper to win the Pulitzer Prize for music. Although they have been writing for generations, the literary establishment is now recognizing and rewarding Black male literature.

A Space of One's Own: Articulating the Scope of the Female in American Literature

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 2:13pm
Ariel Silver, PhD
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Call for Papers, for an accepted session at the next NeMLA conference, in Boston, March 5-8, 2020.

 

NeMLA’s 2020 theme will be: "Shaping and Sharing Identities: Spaces, Places, Languages, and Cultures"

 

A Space of One's Own: Articulating the Scope of the Female in American Literature

Call for Submissions: Research Society for American Periodicals 2018-19 Article Prize

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 1:40pm
Brian Sweeney / Research Society for American Periodicals
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 1, 2019

The Research Society for American Periodicals invites submissions for its 2018-19 Article Prize.

The prize is awarded to the best article on the subject of American periodicals published in a peer-reviewed academic journal between January 1, 2018 and December 31, 2019. RSAP takes an expansive view of “periodicals” and will consider any article that focuses on serial publications in print or digital form in the Americas, broadly construed.  We also welcome submissions from any field or discipline.

The Article Prize is designed for early-career scholars. Graduate students and those who received their Ph.D. no earlier than January 1, 2014 are eligible to apply.

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