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EMERGING & DISMANTLING: Feminist Killjoys Confront SSSL’s Past and Present

updated: 
Tuesday, August 13, 2019 - 1:53pm
SSSL: Society for the Study of Southern Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 4, 2019

CFP // EMERGING & DISMANTLING: Feminist Killjoys Confront SSSL’s Past and Present
SSSL: Society for the Study of Southern Literature Biennial Conference 
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR

SAMLA 91 Special Call for Abstracts: A Toni Morrison Tribute

updated: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 12:04pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 13, 2019

SAMLA 91 Special Call for Abstracts: A Toni Morrison Tribute

To honour the late Toni Morrison, SAMLA seeks papers to explore her illimitable legacy as a writer, publisher, intellectual, and citizen. SAMLA welcomes abstracts on any topics germane to Morrison's work and life. Special consideration will be given to abstracts addressing:

-          Timothy Greenfield-Sanders' recent documentary Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am (2019)

-          Morrison's final non-fiction collection The Source of Self-Regard: Essays, Speeches, Meditations (2019)

-          Teaching Morrison in the Twenty-First Century

Representations of Black Motherhood and Photography.

updated: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 11:59am
Women Picturing Revolution
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 16, 2019

Women Picturing Revolution is pleased to announce a call for papers on the topic of Representations of Black Motherhood and Photography.

Approaches to Teaching Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

updated: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 11:54am
Lynn Domina
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl is one of the most frequently taught texts—it appears on syllabi for American literature, African American literature, American history, life writing, and gender or women’s studies courses. It is taught in high schools as well as in colleges and universities. Yet, very few resources are currently available for instructors.

Reading in Theory (ACLA 2020)

updated: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 11:29am
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Reading in Theory

 

Extended Call for Papers: Select chapters needed / Representations of African American Professionals on TV Series Since the 1990s

updated: 
Sunday, August 11, 2019 - 12:57pm
LaToya Brackett
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Please send an email with interest to latoyatbrackett@gmail.com. The volume is almost complete but I am looking for several chapters as shared at the end of this call. Please see if there are any you may be interested in and we can discuss more about the requirements. I am looking for a QUICK turnaround, but I am flexible. I can send a full CFP when you inquire.

Thank you.

Call for Papers:

Working Title: Representations of African American Professionals on TV Series Since the 1990s

Publication by McFarland Press

Edited by LaToya T. Brackett

 

Extended Call for Papers:

Feeling (Un)American: Race and National Belonging in the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Thursday, August 8, 2019 - 12:00pm
North East Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In his 1903 The Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois poses a question at the heart of the African-American literary tradition: “How does it feel to be a problem?” We see the question’s precursors in Walker’s Appeal, Douglass’ address on the Fourth of July, and Harper’s anti-slavery poetry. It reverberates in Hurston’s “How It Feels To Be Colored Me,” Ellison’s “black and blue,” Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, and Rankine’s Citizen. Taking up the affective relationship between race and national belonging, these texts ask us to contend with what it feels like to be black in a nation founded on anti-blackness. Indeed, as Baldwin and Coates make clear, the problem lies ever “between the world and me.”

 

Call for Papers: American Literature at PCA 2020

updated: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 10:54am
Corey Taylor / Popular Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

The American Literature Area of the Popular Culture Association invites submissions for our National Conference, to be held April 15-18, 2020 at the Downtown Marriott in Philadelphia, PA.

Irreverence toward the Canon - C19 2020 roundtable CFP

updated: 
Friday, August 2, 2019 - 11:14am
Sean Ash Gordon, University of Massachusetts Amherst
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 16, 2019

In a teaching evaluation for a survey course, a student complained of “irreverence toward the canon,” perhaps conflating “canon” with institutional authority and “proper” knowledge, and a lack of reverence with moral laxity or heresy. But we believe “irreverence toward the canon” should be a goal of our critical teaching and scholarship, not a flaw. How can we be more irreverent toward the canon?

James Baldwin Review Volume 6

updated: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019 - 9:40am
James Baldwin Review
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 1, 2020

 

James Baldwin Review (JBR), an annual peer-reviewed journal, is seeking submissions for its sixth volume. An Open Access online publication, James Baldwin Review brings together a wide array of peer-reviewed critical essays and creative non-fiction on the life, writings, and legacies of James Baldwin. JBR publishes essays that invigorate scholarship on James Baldwin, catalyse explorations of the literary, political, and cultural influence of Baldwin’s writing and political activism, and deepen our understanding and appreciation of this complex and luminary figure.

The Next Act: Approaches to the Problem of the Theatre Canon in Undergraduate Education

updated: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019 - 9:40am
Lindsey Mantoan / Linfield College
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

for a new anthology

 

The Next Act: Approaches to the Problem of the Theatre Canon in Undergraduate Education

Co-Editors: Lindsey Mantoan, Matthew Moore, and Angela Farr Schiller

 

Canonicity is not only a list of texts, but a way of thinking about what the texts signify.

- Randy Laist

“The Self-Deconstructing Canon:

Teaching the Survey Course Without Perpetuating Hegemony.”

Currents in Teaching and Learning Vol. 1 No. 2 (2009): 51

 

The Short Story's Global Dimensions - Panel ACLA Chicago

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 3:02pm
Gavin Jones (Stanford), Michael Collins (King's College, London)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

Gavin Jones (Stanford) and Michael Collins (KCL) are seeking contributors for a panel on the "The Short Story's Global Dimensions" at the Annual Meeting of the ACLA in Chicago, 19th - 22nd March 2020. Abstract proposals of around 200 words should be sent to the organisers by August 30th.

 

https://www.acla.org/short-storys-global-dimensions  

 

SSSL 2020: The Uses and Abuses of Shame

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:54pm
Courtney George/ Columbus State University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Society for the Study of Southern Literature (SSSL) 2020: The Uses and Abuses of Shame in the American South

Believing Women in the Late-Nineteenth Century

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:43pm
Arielle Zibrak / University of Wyoming
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 19, 2019

Please consider submitting an abstract for this panel proposal at the 2020 C19 conference in Coral Gables, FL. Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh before the Senate Judiciary Committee in September 2018 helped make “Believe Women” a new rallying cry for the #metoo movement(s). This roundtable will examine the contentious issue of women’s believability during the latter half of the nineteenth century, a time when the credibility of women was also at the forefront of popular consciousness, occasionally heralded but more often interrogated. How did writers and activists push back against the persistent gaslighting of women during the postbellum period?

Octavia Butler and Afrofuturism Edited Collection

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:42pm
Lilith Acadia, Ji Hyun Lee
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019

Seeking final submissions for Octavia Butler’s Afrofuturistic Visions: Reframing Identity, Culture, and History. This edited collection is under contract with Lexington Books and slated for publication in 2020.

 

Call for Chapters - Collected Essays on Teaching African American Texts by White Faculty

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:44pm
Cheryl Boots / Boston University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 16, 2019

Following up the 2019 NeMLA Roundtable “White Allies/Co-conspirators:Teaching African American Literature,” Lexington Books has expressed interest in publishing a collection of essays about white faculty teaching texts by persons of color.

Soundtracks of African American Prose

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:44pm
Cheryl Boots / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

African American works often include references to music that may or may not be recognized by a wide reading audience. For example, the spirituals that Martin Luther King, Jr. chanted in his speeches provide added rhetorical context for his words; yet those who do not know the songs do not have a more nuanced understanding of his oratory. Langston Hughes and James Baldwin both crafted their writing with music in mind. Baldwin acknowledged in the New York Times Book Review that “I…model myself on jazz musicians and try to write the way they sound.”

African American & Latinx Literature Case Studies; Teaching While Privileged

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:15pm
Cheryl Boots / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Privilege comes in many forms whether race, class, gender, or education. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, 84% of full time faculty are white, 25% of those professors are women. With these overarching statistics nationally, at many institutions, classes that focus on African American or Latinx literature are taught largely, if not completely, by faculty who are not from that racial or cultural demographic. When white faculty teach these courses, they may need to confront their own privilege and cultural “blind spots.” Proposed case study presentations can address teaching either African American or Latinx texts.

The Black Arts Movement in the United States and Algeria

updated: 
Saturday, July 27, 2019 - 12:26pm
Faculté des Langues Etrangeres/Université Abd el Hamid Ibn Badis/Algeria
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 30, 2019

International Conference on

“The Black Arts Movement in the United States and Algeria

18-19 November, 2019

 

EXTENDED DEADLINE

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):

I. Segregation and Colonialism

I.1. James Baldwin on Justice/Injustice in the Algerian Context

I.2. Dr. Martin Luther King and Ahmed Ben Bella: “Linking Two Injustices”

I.3. Ben Bella, W. E. Dubois and Pan-Africanism

II. The Emergence of the Black Arts Movement

Hip Hop Ecologies (Workshop and Special Issue)

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 2:09pm
University of Konstanz, Germany
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Hip Hop Ecologies: A Workshop at the University of Konstanz (June 26-28, 2020)

Hip hop is one of the globally most successful forms of cultural production today. Since its emergence in the African American and Latino neighborhoods of 1970s New York City, it has spread around the world and exerted a considerable impact not only on pop culture, but on societal debates around race, class, public safety, nationality, gender, and a range of other issues. The rapidly expanding field of hip hop studies has examined its artistic development and cultural significance from a variety of angles. What has remained almost entirely absent from scholarly debate is the relationship between hip hop and the environment.

2020 C19: Reforming Women

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 1:57pm
Emily Banta / Rutgers University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 16, 2019

Please consider submitting an abstract for this proposed panel for the 2020 C19 conference in Coral Gables.

Reforming Women

Women were powerful activists in a range of nineteenth-century reform movements, agitating for abolition, temperance, prison reform, education reform, and women’s suffrage, to name a few. This panel asks how women’s reform work participated in the practices of dissent and consent, exploring the politics and poetics of nineteenth-century women’s activism. The very term “reform” bridges material change and continuity in the act of making: the work of re-forming involves repetition, revision, and return, which present substantial political possibilities as well as distinct limits.  

Desegregating Comics: Debating Blackness in Early American Comics, 1900-1960

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 1:52pm
Qiana Whitted / University of South Carolina
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Contributions are invited for a collection of original essays that explore race and blackness in American comic books, comic strips, and editorial cartoons from the turn of the twentieth century through the industry’s Golden Age in the 1940s and 1950s. The historical perception of black people in comic art has long been tied to caricatured images of indecipherable minstrels, witch doctors, and brutal savages, yet archives reveal a more racially complex narrative and aesthetic landscape, one that was enriched by the debates among comics artists, writers, editors, and readers about how blackness could be expressed on the page.

Universities Studying Slavery 2019 Fall Symposium “The Academy’s Original Sin”

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 1:33pm
University of Cincinnati/Xavier University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 1, 2019

When: October 9-12, 2019 

Where: Xavier University & The University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 

Xavier University and the University of Cincinnati are proud to co-sponsor the Universities Studying Slavery (USS) Fall 2019 Symposium, entitled “The Academy’s Original Sin.” USS is a multi-institutional collaborative effort working to address historical and contemporary issues dealing with race and inequality in higher education and university communities, and the complicated legacies of slavery in modern American society.  

“Imagined Blackness in Imagined Communities”

updated: 
Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - 12:54pm
DeLisa Hawkes/ U of Maryland, College Park
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

Afrofuturism has become increasingly central to critical conversations about Afro-pessimism, race relations, and cultural histories. This proposed panel draws from Benedict Anderson’s conception of “nation” in his pivotal text Imagined Communities as a generative starting point for thinking about black community formations, black futurity, and cultural histories represented in literature. Anderson claims that “since World War II every successful revolution has defined itself in national terms” (2). However, nations are merely “imagined political communities… as both inherently limited and sovereign” (6).

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