all recent posts

Is the Novel of the Future a Video Game? Video Games as Narratives

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In video games such as Life is Strange, the Witcher series, and Telltale’s The Walking Dead, multiple story choices are offered that are the purview not of the protagonist but of the player, who may be forced to choose from a limited set of outcomes but is still in control of the narrative’s pace and flow. Unlike traditional narratives in which the writer is in control of the characters’ choices and their outcomes, video game narratives involve the participant in an interactive shared story with multiple possibilities.

Pulp Fiction, with Real Pulp: Crime Writing as Creative Writing

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In the 1930s and ‘40s, crime fiction was often published on cheap paper made of wood pulp, and this reputation as faintly disreputable has stayed with it, pursuing it into creative writing classes in which “genre-writing” has traditionally been discouraged. This panel invites creative writers as well as literary scholars to consider crime writing—true crime, mystery and detective fiction, suspense fiction, and film or television drama—in the context of creative writing pedagogy. Is crime writing inherently disreputable? Does this genre have a place in the creative writing classroom?

Creative Writing in the Digital Age

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

One immediate side-effect of the current ominous economic climate and general uncertainty of our times has been a downturn in traditional publishing. Even before the COVID-19 crisis, consolidation of publishing houses, the closure of brick-and-mortar bookshops, and the supremacy of Amazon had begun to permanently alter the way creative writing is published. At the same time, creative content on the internet has never been so abundant, with poetry, film, and fiction being shared and streamed in ways that create a flourishing if generally nonremunerative cultural climate. This panel looks at options available to creative writers in the wake of the decline of traditional publishing options.

Creative Writing in the Age of the Pandemic

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

While it is too soon to fully assess the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic will stand as a watershed in global human life, creative writers as canaries in the cultural coalmine will be among the first to try to render it comprehensible and are already responding to the seismic shifts. The unexpected changes the pandemic has created have altered all of the processes that sustain human life, the social practices and interactions that are the mainstay of poetry, fiction, and drama, perhaps permanently. Enforced social isolation has caused people from all strata of society to contemplate what it means to be engaged in human culture while at the same time facing the possibility of sudden and random mortality, even mass extinction.

The Grad Student’s Guide to Intersectionality in the University (Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

While universities have long been a space for cultivating generations of academics, researchers, and intellectuals, they have never been exempt from the dynamics of power that underlie any institution based on interpersonal relations. Recent strides at improving inclusivity—for example: greater diversity among faculty and student populations, or increasing numbers of sociopolitically- and culturally-cognizant programs—belie the reality that universities operate along ideological lines that can (re)produce inequities and social hierarchies.

Creative Writing in the Age of Trump

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In an age of Twitter rants, allegations of fake news, and increasingly bitter partisan divides, what happens to the novel or poem? Does literary material have to engage with the political? And if it doesn’t, must the political be read between its lines? What are the possibilities for creative work in an era that is increasingly in a state of emergency? This panel asks creative writers to consider the question of political and literary engagement in our political age. Writers of all modalities and genres are encouraged to explore these questions in the context of their own work. This panel asks creative writers to consider the question of a political literary engagement in our political age. Writers of all modalities and genres are welcome.

The Modified Body in Media and Literature (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

While the overarching narrative that frames scholarship on body modification seems to reduce it—especially in the case of tattoos—into what Matthew Lodder calls a “chronological tourism,” that is, that every tattoo merely speaks of “internal truths” that chronicle milestones in one’s personal mythmaking (as a response to questions like “What does your tattoo mean? What were you going through when you got it?”), such a view eschews the discursive potential of body modification as a social act in favour of pure radical individualism.

Beyond Yunioshi: Rewriting New Asian Masculinities in Media and Literature (Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

The convergence of critical masculinity studies with postcolonial theory aims, at its core, to interrogate discourses that created hegemonic and binary categories that in turn became eventual grounds for the historical racialization of gender and sexuality, as well as the gendering and sexualization of race. Taking the image of “palimpsest” as its semantic inspiration, this session seeks to problematize the layerings and shifting stratigraphies of power that obscure, erase, or overwrite the specific historical, cultural, and political experiences that underpin notions of Asian masculinity and male identity as represented in various forms of literature and media.

Queer Utopias: Decolonizing Utopianism in Contemporary Literary Studies (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:24pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA 2021)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

José Esteban Muñoz’s ground-breaking work Cruising Utopia has sought to unite scholarship from the disparate fields of queer and utopian studies by contending that “queerness is primarily about futurity and hope” and “queerness is always on the horizon” (Muñoz 11). Aside from this, it has also powerfully contested the academic pessimism toward utopian political idealism that was becoming a dominant feature in queer theory at this time. Drawing on Muñoz’s work, this panel invites paper abstracts about queer utopias and queer utopian possibility demonstrated in literatures of the 20th and 21st centuries.

Italian Romanticism and the Americas: Reflections on History and Myth (Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:24pm
Ernesto Livorni / University of Wisconsin - Madison
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Several Romantic artists and, in particular, writers focused on historical events that brought the Americas on the forefront of the European imagination. Certainly, many Italian writers looked at what then still was the New World with a prismatic approach, either because they were writing on historical events that occurred in North America (especially the formation of the United States) or because they were looking at the independence wars fought in South America; either because the Americas offered shelter to the exiles, or because they provided new ground for thinking about the relationship between nature and culture.

Call For Submissions - "A Quit Lit Reader"

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:24pm
Graduate School Press of Syracuse University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 17, 2020

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Abstracts due July 15, 2020

 

The Graduate School Press of Syracuse University invites submissions for a contributed volume titled A Quit Lit Reader, to be published by the Graduate School Press and distributed by Syracuse University Press. The editors welcome contributions from graduate students, faculty, and administrators working within academia, while especially seeking reflections of those pursuing careers mostly or wholly outside it.

 

Call for Special Issues

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:21pm
PLL: Papers on Language and Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 31, 2021

Special-Issue Proposal Guidelines

Papers on Language and Literature is seeking proposals for special issues on subjects including but not limited to

Digital Humanities

Film

Literary Translation

Print Culture

PLL is a generalist publication that is committed to publishing work on a variety of literatures, languages, and chronological periods. We accept proposals year-round. We are a quarterly and expect to publish a special issue once a year, every year. The specific volume and issue will be determined later, depending on the editors’ schedule.

Trans Media Pedagogy

updated: 
Sunday, June 21, 2020 - 11:26am
Dr. Dan Vena/ Carleton University, Queen's University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 31, 2020

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

“Trans Media Pedagogy” 

Journal of Cinema and Media Studies Teaching Dossier section

Edited by Dr. Dan Vena (Carleton University/ Queen’s University) and Dr. Nael Bhanji (Trent University) 

 

Label Me Latina/o CALL FOR SCHOLARLY ESSAYS

updated: 
Friday, June 19, 2020 - 4:32pm
Label Me Latina/o
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 15, 2020

Label Me Latina/o is an online, refereed international e-journal that focuses on Latino Literary Production in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The journal invites scholarly essays focusing on these writers for its biannual publication. 

Gladiator (2000): Magazine Covers/Memorabilia/Costumes

updated: 
Thursday, June 18, 2020 - 6:03pm
St. Thomas University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 25, 2020

Vernon Press invites chapter proposals on the theme: “A Hero Will Endure”: Essays at the Twentieth Anniversary of Gladiator for an edited collection.

Martin M. Winkler edited a collection about Gladiator regarding its historical and media aspects. There are also several single essays about psychological (Skweres), political, or cultural issues related to the film. Nevertheless, there have been no other collections on the cultural and social impact of the film since its release. The twentieth anniversay has just passed, and the time is right for presenting new insights about this award-winning film.

Specific topics that the editor is seeking to round out the collection include:

(ONLINE) LONELINESS: 2nd International Interdisciplinary Conference

updated: 
Thursday, June 18, 2020 - 1:32pm
InMind Support
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

 

What makes us happy and content in our life? Some people may point to fabulous fame, fortune, or money. Some may say that the key to happiness are interpersonal relationships. But what if someone is alone? Is loneliness really disastrous? Are there any benefits of loneliness? Can loneliness become an epidemic? In order to answer such questions, during our conference we will have to concentrate on many particular issues. Thus, we are interested in all aspects of loneliness in the past and in the present-day world.

Optimizing Diverse Realities of Study Abroad Experiences

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:55am
Brendan W. Spinelli/North East Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Study abroad is frequently imagined as a transformative endeavor during a student’s university experience. Students often begin their studies with a tentative roadmap of courses guided by their future career goals, and, if the stars align, they will study abroad in their third or fourth year. Studying abroad is often encouraged in foreign language programs, but is traditionally framed as a parallel experience to their at-home semester. While of course the linguistic, cultural, intellectual and personal benefits of this experience have always been recognized to be invaluable, the long-lasting impact of the study abroad path is often not fully optimized.

Beyond Crisis: Raymond Williams and the present conjuncture

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:55am
Victoria Allen (University of Kiel), Harald Pittel (University of Potsdam)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 16, 2020

Beyond Crisis: Raymond Williams and the present conjuncture

A special issue of Coils of the Serpent: Journal for the Study of Contemporary Power

Guest Editors: Victoria Allen (Kiel) and Harald Pittel (Potsdam)

 

Deadline extended --- CFP: Media, Materiality and Emergency

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:55am
MAST: Journal of Media Art Study and Theory
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 31, 2020

 CFP: Media, Materiality and EmergencyThe deadline for full submissions is extended to 31st July 2020 (for submission in Nov 2020)

 

MAST: The Journal of Media Art Study and Theory

Guest editor: Timothy Barker (University of Glasgow)

In what ways do questions of materiality matter in a time of crisis? What does it mean to explore the matter of things at a time when we are threatened with the annihilation of that matter, its disappearance, or its disintegration? In this issue, MAST journal seeks to answer and further explore these questions through essays from arts practitioners and theorists.

for more details please see: http://mast-nemla.org/cfp-issue-2/

Religion, Mobilities and Belonging in Contemporary Anglophone Literature and Film/TV Series Production

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:54am
Ex-Centric Narratives: Journal of Anglophone Literature, Culture and Media (Special Issue 5, Dec. 2021)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 15, 2020

SPECIAL ISSUE - CALL FOR PAPERS

Ex-Centric Narratives: Journal of Anglophone Literature, Culture and Media 

(Special Issue 5, Dec. 2021)

 

SPECIAL THEME:

Religion, Mobilities and Belonging

in Contemporary Anglophone Literature and Film/TV Series Production

 

SPECIAL ISSUE GUEST EDITORS:

Dr. Efthymia-Lydia Roupakia, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

roupakia@enl.auth.gr

The Secular and the Literary: Re-thinking Analysis and Interpretation in Light of Post-Secularism

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:54am
NEMLA 2021- North East Modern Language Association 52nd Annual Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Ever since Charles Taylor (A Secular Age) and Talal Asad (Formations of the Secular) questioned the supremacy of secularization, scholars in the fields of philosophy, sociology, and anthropology have used post-secularism to analyze gender, state violence, religion, pain, the senses, and more. This perspective has helped us to consider how secularization has been accepted as normative and inevitable, and how it functions as a disciplinary apparatus or as a constructed ideology.

The Graveyard in Literature: Liminality and Social Critique

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:54am
Dr Aoileann Ni Eigeartaigh, Dundalk Institute of Technology
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 31, 2020

This edited collection will be published by Cambridge Scholars in late 2020. The volume invites essays that focus on literary or other cultural texts that use the graveyard as a liminal space within which received narratives and social values can be challenged, and new and empowering perspectives on the present articulated.  Essays in the volume will examine the use of liminality as a vehicle for social critique, paying particular attention to the ways in which liminal spaces facilitate the construction of alternative perspectives.

A Chapter should be no longer than 6000 words, and should be original and previously unpublished.

Terrorism and the City

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:53am
Kristen Skjonsby / Pacific and Ancient Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

This panel invites papers that address how terrorism, whether historically or contemporarily, engages with and within the city. Sociologist Saskia Sassen argued in “When the City Itself Becomes a Technology of War” that asymmetrical military strategy has turned the space of the city itself into a technology of warfare. She writes that asymmetric warfare, the military strategy that defines U.S. engagement with terrorist cells across the world, are “partial, intermittent and lack clear endings…They are one indication of how the center no longer holds – whatever the center’s format: the imperial power of a period of the national state of our modernity” (36).

21st Century Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:53am
Kristen Skjonsby / Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Networks, broadly defined, share tasks and information between nodes through a unique spatial constellation which allows them to distribute power evenly and, in the process, eliminates the need for a concentrated source of directives. For this reason, they have been looked at within various disciplinary communities as harbingers of negative and positive possibilities in the 21st Century. What are networks capable of, and how does literature address the significance of networks, both locally and globally? Are authors working to alter, exploit, or combat modes of power through their portrayal of various networks? This standing session invites papers from all fields, but has a particular interest in papers that address the local and global.

Teaching with Images in Composition Courses

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:53am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

NeMLA 2021 Conference, Philadelphia, PA

NeMLA2021 Roundtable: “Beyond the Silk Road”

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:53am
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

For centuries Italy and East Asia have been at the center of numerous economic, political, and cultural exchanges. Studies have mostly focused on the relationship between Italy and China. As Zhang (2018) points out, in the last decade this topic has piqued the interest of a number of scholars on Italy-China issues. In addition to the special issues of the Journal of Modern Italian Studies (2010) and in the Journal of Italian Cinema and Media Studies (2014), books have been published on Italian-Chinese relations such as Marinelli and Andornino (2013) and Chinese migration to Italy (Pedone 2013).

 

Althusser's Renaissance (RSA Dublin, April 7-10, 2021)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:53am
Martin Moraw
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 31, 2020

Louis Althusser’s thought is receiving renewed attention in the humanities and social sciences. This session seeks to bring together scholars of various disciplines and specializations to explore the potential of a return to Althusser in the particular context of Renaissance/early modern studies. Contributions may reflect on Althusser’s writings on early modern figures, make use of Althusserian concepts to produce new readings of early modern texts, or engage relevant theoretical questions.  

The Location of Utopia

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 9:53am
World Literature Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 15, 2020

Although Utopia literally means no-place, in some utopias the location definitely has some cultural significance. If utopia is in the sun or under the earth, it is probably not the case. Thomas More put his Utopia in the South Atlantic, but the imaginary geography of the island does not seem to have any importance for social construction. More’s Utopia does not seem to have anything South American. However, the geographical and temporal orientation of Chinese and European utopias seem to be different in many aspects, which carry a politico-cultural significance. The special issue of World Literature Studies will explore two questions about the location of utopias:

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