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Mental Health Narratives – History, Concepts, Education, Practice

updated: 
Wednesday, June 30, 2021 - 12:48pm
Ronja Bodola / LSU Health Sciences Center
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 23, 2021

Extended Deadline! Collection Mental Health Narratives – History, Concepts, Education, Practice 

Edited by Ronja Bodola, PhD; Michelle B. Moore, PsyD; Cody Roi, D.O. 

NeMLA 2022 Panel: Healing Practices and Beliefs in Literatures of the Americas

updated: 
Tuesday, June 29, 2021 - 10:35am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

NeMLA 2022: Baltimore, Maryland. March 10-13

Panel Chair: Tania Nicolaou

How does contemporary fiction of the Americas and Caribbean explore practices of healing? This panel considers all aspects of healing, including but not limited to religion, indigenous practices and rituals, the spiritual, and through community and the collective. How does their depiction in literature allow for generative further discussion about identity, culture, and tradition, and what does this mean in the 21st century?

Space, place, and locus: Mapping the New Europe

updated: 
Tuesday, June 29, 2021 - 9:27am
Early Research Academics (ERA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 16, 2021

CFP: Space, Place, and Locus: Mapping the New Europe (Edited Collection)

Abstract Deadline: 16 August 2021 (500 words)

Chapter Deadline: 17 December 2021 (5000-6000 words)

Editors:  Izabella Wodzka, Mathis Gronau, and Brittany Eldridge (UCL)

 

Early Research Academics (Those obtaining their PhDs, and those who have graduated within the past 5 years, are STRONGLY welcomed to apply. We are specifically looking for papers from those two groups as that is the mission of ERA. If you happen to see this and believe one of your students or friends is a good fit for our collection, please pass it on.)

 

Peter Lang Publishing

 

Autism in Literature (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:35pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

NeMLA conference in Baltimore, MD, March 10-13, 2022

'Littérature du déclassement': Social Descent in the Contemporary French Novel

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:34pm
Patrick Lyons, University of California, Berkeley
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

CFP – Panel

 

'Littérature du déclassement': Social Descent in the Contemporary French Novel

 

 

53nd Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Convention

Baltimore, MD

10-13 March, 2022

 

Deadline for abstracts: 30 September, 2021.

 

Medieval in Popular Culture Sponsored Sessions for MAPACA 2021 (7/15/21; virtual 11/10-13/21)

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:04pm
Michael A Torregrossa / Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 15, 2021

Medieval in Popular Culture Sponsored Sessions for MAPACA 2021

Panels to run under the Medieval & Renaissance Area

2021 Annual Meeting of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association

Virtual Event, 10-13 November 2021

 

The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture seeks paper proposals related to the following three topics for inclusion in the Medieval & Renaissance Area sessions at the 2021 Annual Meeting of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association.

Julien Gracq: un écrivain géographe

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:03pm
NEMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Julien Gracq : un écrivain géographe/ Julien Gracq : un écrivain géographe (NEMLA MARS 2022, Baltimore, USA)

JOSEPH CONRAD NETWORKED WITHIN THE CLASSROOM AND WITHOUT

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:03pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 15, 2021

JOSEPH CONRAD NETWORKED WITHIN THE CLASSROOM AND WITHOUT

JOSEPH CONRAD SOCIETY OF AMERICA

 

Imaging Peace: Care-full Non-violence in Contemporary Sci-fi Narratives (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:03pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

In literature and popular culture, the non-violent approach is vastly underrepresented as a viable philosophy. This is problematic because the stories we tell shape the imaginary we live out of. Part of the reason the pacifist position seems so untenable is precisely because it remains so unimagined. One thinks of the so-called canon with its repertoire of violent heroes: Homer, Shakespeare, Milton, Arthurian legend. Even today’s popular “canon” features heroes who consistently solve problems through violence: the Marvel Cinematic Universe, DC Comics’ films, the John Wick series, and the classic, decade-spanning Alien franchise. The myth of redemptive violence continues unabated.

Representations of Mental Health and Trauma Care in the Marvel Cinematic Universe

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:03pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

With a growing social consciousness in the contemporary milieu, even large corporations such as Disney have begun to take an activist turn. Of late, Marvel has been especially sensitive to ongoing issues regarding race and gender. This is particularly evident in its latest incarnations available through Disney +: Wandavision and Falcon and the Winter Solider. Accompanying this messaging has also been a positive representation of mental health care and the effects of individual and collective trauma. These are not superheroes who take a beating and walk away unscathed; these are highly developed and nuanced characters whose arcs take shape over several different films and multiple episodes.

The Write Kind of Change: Literature as Social Activism

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 1:52pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Vladimir Nabokov once suggested that any form of reading which pays heightened attention to the socio-political realities of our world, rather than paying exclusive attention to the use of literary devices present in a given text, constitutes a form of “bad reading.” In her 2017 book Paraliterary: The Making of Bad Readers in Postwar America, Merve Emre works to reclaim this form of bad reading, arguing that these so-called bad readers are “literate subjects [who use] reading to navigate a political climate that champion[s] liberal individualism, on the one hand, while establishing unprecedented forms of institutional oversight, on the other” (5).

Imagining Geopolitics in the Age of the Anthropocene

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 1:46pm
Ruiyun Sara Liao/ SUNY at Binghamton University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

A geological timescale provides a way of thinking about power relations between human beings and all kinds of geological forces. Since Paul Crutzen and Eugene Stoermer proposed the term of the Anthropocene, the concept of the age of the Anthropocene brought out the environmental concern. This term evidently intends to mean "the human epoch" because the human force has become one of the dominant geophysical forces. It is believed that this new epoch began in the later 18th Century when the global effects of human activities have become clearly noticeable. That is, the age of the Anthropocene comes along with globalization.

For Whose Own Good?: French (Post-)Colonialism and Interdependence

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 1:43pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021

Abstract:

“C’est avec 76.900 hommes que la France assure la paix et les bienfaits de la civilisation à ses 60 millions d’Indigènes. ”

2nd Rupkatha International Open Conference on Recent Advances in Interdisciplinary Humanities, 2021 (Virtual)

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 1:41pm
Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 7, 2021

2nd Rupkatha International Open Conference on Recent Advances in Interdisciplinary Humanities, 2021 (Virtual)

August 28-30, 2021

Organized by

Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities
(Indexed by Web of Science, Scopus, ERIHPLUS, EBSCO, UGC)

In collaboration with

The University of Arizona, Tucson, USA
Department of German Studies
&
The University of Talca, Chile
Institute of Humanistic Studies

Website: http://rioc.rupkatha.com/

Inaugural Speaker
Prof. Albrecht Classen, University of Arizona

Monsters of Beowulf (8/1/21; NEPCA virtual 10/21-23/21)

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 1:40pm
Michael Torregrossa / Monsters & the Monstrous Area of the Northeast Popular/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 1, 2021

Monsters of Beowulf: Past, Present, Future

Session Proposed for the 2021 Conference of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association

Sponsored by the Monsters & the Monstrous Area

Virtual event, Thursday, 21 October, through Saturday, 23 October 2021.

Proposals due by 1 August 2021.

 

RACISM, NATIONALISM AND XENOPHOBIA International Interdisciplinary ON-LINE Conference

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 5:52am
InMind Support
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 9, 2021

ON-LINE CONFERENCE

26-27 July 2021

CFP:

It is widely known that ideologies of racism, nationalism, and xenophobia are dangerous and spread all over the world. We want to examine these terms as much as possible, from many perspectives and variable aspects: in politics, society, psychology, culture, and many more. We also want to devote considerable attention to how the phenomena of racism, nationalism and xenophobia are represented in artistic practices: in literature, film, theatre or visual arts.

Crossing Territories. Recognition across Time, Space, and Textuality in the US and Beyond

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 5:28am
26TH AISNA BIENNIAL CONFERENCE. Department of Humanities, L’Aquila (Italy), September 23-25, 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, July 4, 2021

 

Paper proposals of around 300 words should be submitted, along with a short bio, to the panel coordinator(s), to the conference organizing committee (aisna2021univaq@gmail.com), and to the AISNA Secretary, Anna De Biasio (anna.de-biasio@unibg.it) by June 27, 2021. Acceptance will be notified by July 5, 2021. Panels exceeding four participants will be split into two sessions.

For any general query about the conference, please contact the organizing committee (aisna2021univaq@gmail.com)

N.B.: We hope that we will be able to meet in L’Aquila for the 2021 AISNA conference.

Decentering the White Male Gaze: Inclusivity and Diverse Voices in Beowulf Studies (NeMLA 2022)

updated: 
Sunday, June 27, 2021 - 12:40pm
Richard Fahey - NeMLA 2022
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 25, 2021

Beowulf studies has traditionally been the domain of white male scholars who have historically dominated both the scholarship and translations of the poem. This session seeks to decenter the white male gaze and invites novel perspectives from often marginalized voices in the field to contribute to the many ongoing academic conversations focused on Beowulf.

Religious Futurisms

updated: 
Sunday, June 27, 2021 - 3:37am
Sumeyra Buran Utku (UC Riverside); Jim Clarke
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 31, 2021

Religious Futurisms: A Call for Papers

 

We are pleased to announce a call for papers for a forthcoming collection of essays on the broad topic of Religious Futurisms, to be edited by Sumeyra Buran Utku and Jim Clarke.

Religious Futurisms derives its intellectual inspiration from the emergence of Afrofuturism and other Alternative Futurisms as ideological and analytical frameworks in recent years. Religious Futurisms can manifest as ideology, criticality, prophecy, futurology, philosophy or artistic practice. They may be discerned in a wide range of forms, ranging from speculative theology to performative videogame interaction to abstract or polysemous imagery in visual art.

#MeToo and Contemporary Literary Studies (NeMLA panel)

updated: 
Friday, June 25, 2021 - 11:26am
Mary K. Holland and Heather Hewett, SUNY New Paltz
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

#MeToo and Contemporary Literary Studies: panel accepted for the 2022 NeMLA conference (March 10-13, 2022; Baltimore, MD)

Early modern drama, archives and performing memory

updated: 
Friday, June 25, 2021 - 11:26am
Sally Barnden / King's College London
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 31, 2021

This collection will consider relationships between performances and archives, and the impact of race, gender, sexuality, and class on how performance is documented. It will ask what is remembered and forgotten by theatre archives, how archives supplement and occasionally supplant memories of performances, and how those memories and omissions carry into later performances. 

 

'Dance of the Northern Renaissance' - a Journal of the Northern Renaissance special issue

updated: 
Friday, June 25, 2021 - 11:25am
Journal of the Northern Renaissance
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 19, 2021

JNR invites proposals for a special issue, edited by Lynsey McCulloch and Emily Winerock, on ‘Dance of the Northern Renaissance’. Dance was a key cultural practice of the early modern period: it was integral to theatrical representation; it was a significant element of court ritual; and it fulfilled an important social function. But how might we characterise the particular dance practices of Northern Europe? French, Spanish and Italian traditions have dominated histories of Renaissance dance. However, more recent accounts have challenged the conflation of North and South in discussions of early European dance, drawing attention to the myriad regional and national variations at work.

Memory Markers: Mapping Indian Narratives

updated: 
Friday, June 25, 2021 - 11:25am
Elwin Susan John & Merin Wilson
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, July 20, 2021

Our cultural exercises and transactions have a symbiotic relationship with the past. The traces of our past determine the essence of the present and these traces manifest as memories. This fluid and liminal nature of memories lends an element of elasticity while crafting personal and collective identities, nationhood, history, body, imagination, communities, erasure and approval of knowledge systems and much more. The process of recollecting, recalling, remembering, retrieving, registering, witnessing, repressing, recording, forming, forgetting memories frees them from all forms of spatial and temporal boundaries and makes them powerful agents of disruption and change.

Mental Health & Wellness in Graduate School (GSC Session)

updated: 
Friday, June 25, 2021 - 11:24am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA 2022) Graduate Student Caucus
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Mental health related challenges among graduate students have long been known as a serious concern across universities throughout the world. Findings from a recent survey of graduate students across numerous fields of study, countries, and institutions suggest that graduate students are over six times more likely to experience anxiety and depression than the general population (Evans et. al 2018). Women, LGBTQ students and graduate students from other, minoritized, underrepresented groups in universities are even more vulnerable to such issues.

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