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ArtsPraxis Volume 7, Issue 2b: Social Justice Practices for Educational Theatre

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:48am
NYU Steinhardt
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

As of this writing, we find ourselves about ten days into international protests following the murder of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Protesters the world over have made specific calls to action: acknowledge that black lives matter, educate yourself about social and racial injustice, and change the legal system that allows these heinous acts to go unpunished. In thinking through how we in the field of educational theatre can proactively address these needs, I reminded myself that there are many artists and educators who are already deeply engaged in this work.

ArtsPraxis Volume 7, Issue 2a: Educational Theatre in the Time of COVID-19

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:47am
NYU Steinhardt
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

From the time government agencies and the press reported the emergence of a novel corona virus in late 2019, there has been a fundamental shift in the way we congregate, communicate, and educate across the world. Artists and educators have been called upon to reinvent their practice seemingly overnight. While we struggle to balance our personal health and wellness, our community contributions remain as vital as ever. In tribute to this reinvention, ArtsPraxis invites you to share your scholarship, practice, and praxis. As we’ve asked before, we welcome teachers, drama therapists, applied theatre practitioners, theatre-makers, performance artists, and scholars to offer vocabularies, ideas, strategies, practices, measures, and outcomes.

Community Through Women's Eyes

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:46am
Jeannine Pitas, University of Dubuque and Susanna Cantu Gregory, Clarke University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 15, 2020

 

Call for Personal and Scholarly Essays for Edited Book: Community Through Women’s Eyes

Co-edited by Susanna Cantu Gregory, Ph.D. and Jeannine Pitas, Ph.D.

Keywords: community, faith community, adopted community, spirituality, women’s voices and experiences, intergenerational community, community entrance and departure, temporary community, online community, volunteer, activist, and literary communities.

Critical Approaches to Tradition and Innovation in Graduate Humanities Education

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:46am
Jo Grim and Sam Sorensen/ Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Submissions Information: We seek papers for a panel titled "Critical Approaches to Tradition and Innovation in Graduate Humanities Education" to be held at the Northeast Modern Language Association's 52nd annual convention in Philadelphia, PA, March 11-14, 2021. Please submit abstracts of 300 words here: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18735. For questions or concerns, please contact Jo Grim at jcg314@lehigh.edu or Sam Sorensen at sms416@lehigh.edu. We look forward to reviewing your proposals!  

Soviet Underground and Parallel Cinema

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:45am
East European Film Bulletin (EEFB)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 1, 2020

CFP: Soviet Underground and Parallel Cinema

 

Proposals: 1st of August 2020

Papers due: 15th of October 2020

 

In the early 1980s, two moments of underground film — the so-called Parallel Cinema — emerge in St. Petersburg (then Leningrad) and Moscow. For the first time radical young filmmakers, painters and artists produce amateur films, mainly in 16mm, outside of Goskino’s state monopoly. While the Moscow school’s approach to film is shaped by the influence of conceptualist art, the Leningrad school, associated with “Necrorealism,” explores an expressionist and absurd cinema, circling around death, decay and horror.

Uncharted Medievalisms: Revealing the Medieval in Popular Fiction and Games (Panel) (9/30/2020; NeMLA Philadelphia 3/11-14/2021)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:44am
Michael A. Torregrossa / Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Uncharted Medievalisms: Revealing the Medieval in Popular Fiction and Games (Panel)

52nd Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association

Marriott Downtown Philadelphia, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from 11-14 March 2021

Paper abstracts are due by 30 September 2020

Session organized by Carl B. Sell and Michael A. Torregrossa and sponsored by the Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture.

 

Can We Be More Than the Middle Ages? Medievalism Studies and Medieval Studies (Roundtable) (9/30/2020; NeMLA Philadelphia 3/11-14/2021)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:43am
Michael A. Torregrossa / Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Can We Be More Than the Middle Ages? Medievalism Studies and Medieval Studies (Roundtable)

52nd Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association

Marriott Downtown Philadelphia, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from 11-14 March 2021

Paper abstracts are due by 30 September 2020

Session organized by Michael A. Torregrossa and Carl B. Sell and sponsored by the Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture.

 

Machines in 20th Century Literature, Philosophy and Cinema

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:42am
Giorgia Bordoni - UNC University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

This panel aims to explore the machinic metaphor in the Italian and European literary, cinematographic, and philosophical panorama of the 20th century. Since the Industrial Revolution, machines have established themselves as a crucial, pervasive, and unavoidable presence of individual life and collective existence. The disturbing and fascinating vitality of the machine has shaped all social, political, and economic relationships. Even the literary, cinematographic, and philosophical space was crossed by the new myth of the machine and met its complexity: it refused or exalted it, let itself be inspired by it, analyzed its profound meaning.

Phenomenology of Religious Experience V: (Ir)Rationality and Religiosity During Pandemics

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:38am
Open Theology, De Gruyter
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 31, 2021

CALL FOR PAPERS

for a topical issue of Open Theology

Phenomenology of Religious Experience V: (Ir)Rationality and Religiosity During Pandemics

Edited by:
Olga Louchakova-Schwartz (UC Davis and Graduate Theological Union)
Jason Alvis (University of Vienna)
Michael Staudigl (University of Vienna)

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Viral Memes : Research and Reflections on the Coronapocalypse

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:32am
Shane Trayers & George Sieg
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 1, 2020

No event since the recent millennium, itself an “event” only in the sense created by expectationalism, with Y2K being a paradigmatic “non-event,” has activated apocalyptic sensibilities to the extent that COVID-19 has done.  Its impact has been global, multifarious, and multivalent.  In many places, it has impacted every area of life, and there are very few places where it has not spread: as of June 4, 2020, the only nations reporting no COVID-19 cases were various Pacific islands, Turkmenistan, and North Korea.  In distinction to previous pandemics with cultural impact, the most recent of any significance being the HIV/AIDS pandemic, COVID-19 has been swift and pervasive, without immediate association to any specific sub-population or vectors beyond the

Henry Miller in New Contexts

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:32am
NeMLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

A combination of global transformations within cultural and political perspectives have germinated fresh theoretical approaches to all fields of inquiry. Moving into the third decade of the Twenty-First Century, how does a controversial author like Henry Miller (1891-1980) fit into our current conversations? We could ask some of the following questions: in the era of #MeToo does Miller’s literature and personae alter significantly? How might we approach Miller’s extensive published and/or archival correspondences in terms of Life Writing or the Archival Turn? Miller received copious amounts of fan mail over numerous decades; how do fan mail studies help reveal Miller’s impact on American (and global) readers?

“To learn, to teach, to serve, to enjoy”: The Legacy of Julia Ward Howe

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:31am
The Saturday Morning Club
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 15, 2020

To celebrate the 150th anniversary of Julia Ward Howe’s Saturday Morning Club, a one-day symposium on Howe’s legacy will be held at Boston University’s College of General Studies on Saturday, June 12, 2021.  Professor Megan Marshall will deliver a keynote address Friday evening, June 11, 2021 at a dinner to open the festivities.  Topics on any aspect of Julia Ward Howe’s legacy may include, but are not limited to: Social Reform in 19th Century Feminism; Women Writing Hymns and Poetry; Transatlantic Social Movements; Gender and Identity; Literary Celebrity; Women’s Suffrage; Howe and Material Culture in the Gilded Age; Howe, Abolition, and Race; Ladies’ Clubs, Then and Now; The Domestic Sphere; 19th Century Women’s Travel Writing; Writing Women’s Biography

Special Issue: The Brontës: Sickness, Contagion, Isolation

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:31am
Bronte Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 25, 2020

“The interactions that make us sick also constitute us as a community. Disease emergence dramatizes the dilemma that inspires the most basic human narratives: the necessity and danger of human contact.” Priscilla Ward, Contagious: Cultures, Carriers, and the Outbreak Narrative. Duke UP, 2008.

Archival/Bibliographical Work on American Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:19am
Resources for American Literary Study
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 30, 2020

Resources for American Literary Study, the leading journal of archival and bibliographical scholarship in American literature, is inviting submissions for upcoming issues. Covering all periods of American literature, RALS welcomes both traditional and digital approaches to archival and bibliographical analysis. 

Founded in 1971, RALS remains the only major scholarly periodical of its kind. Each issue includes, in addition to archival and bibliographical research, related book reviews and a unique “Prospects” essay that identifies new directions in the study of major authors. Our editorial board consists of leading scholars from an array of fields and subfields in American literary study.

Making Lit Lit: Forging Connections Between Student Experiences and Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:19am
Chris Jacobs
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

This panel at the 2021 NeMLA convention in Philadelphia, "Making Lit Lit: Forging Connections Between Student Experiences and Literature," will consider how to apply current pedagogical best practices to make literature and culture classes more relevant and engaging, and as a result, more fruitful.
 Presentations--which do not have to be read papers--can be on pedagogical innovations that have been researched and/or implemented in the literature and culture classroom, as well as on applied linguistics or other pedagogical studies that were not specifically on the teaching of literature and culture but could be applied to it (such as those on motivation/investment, needs analysis, TBLT, project-based learning, etc.).

GROWING UP IN LATIN AMERICA - EDITED VOLUME CFP

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:18am
Marco Ramirez / Lehman College CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 30, 2020

Growing up in Latin America is an experience that has been marked by constant negotiations with precarity, (post)coloniality and multiple forms of violence. Numerous literary and audiovisual productions have drawn attention to this issue, which has also elicited significant academic interest. In this edited volume, we invite critical examinations of 20th and 21stcenturies coming-of-age narratives and Bildungsroman dealing with bi-cultural or multi-cultural identities, picaresque and heterodox processes of learning, non hetero-normative sexualities, as well as other alternative processes of development and growth.

Growing up in Latin America: Narratives of Precarity, Postcolonialism, Violence

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:18am
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

The experience of growing up in Latin America for the past two centuries has been marked by constant negotiations with precarity, postcoloniality and multiple forms of violence. Numerous literary and audiovisual productions have drawn attention to this issue. In this session, we invite critical examinations of coming-of-age narratives and bildungsroman dealing with bi-cultural or multi-cultural identities, picaresque and heterodox processes of learning, non hetero-normative sexualities, as well as other alternative processes of development and growth.

Latin American Cosmopolitanisms: Vernacular, Ethical, and Ecological Views of Globality

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 10:18am
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

The question of cosmopolitanism has been crucial to the literatures of Latin America during the 20th and 21st centuries. At the turn of the past century modernistas and vanguardistas proposed innovative views of cultural cosmopolitanism that traced the geopolitical shifts of the continent. Later, as Magical Realism became a global phenomenon, this originally Latin American aesthetics would come to be celebrated as the literary language of the postcolonial world (Bhabha).

Ọyẹ: Journal of Language, Literature and Popular Culture Vol. 2. No. 2 Special Edition: Ekiti

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 9:22am
Ọyẹ: Journal of Language, Literature and Popular Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 2, 2020

Ọyẹ: Journal of Language, Literature and Popular Culture is an academic journal domiciled in the Department of English and Literary Studies of the Federal University, Oye-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria. It seeks to publish insightful research from established and emerging scholars on all aspects of English Language, Literature and Popular Culture, especially as they relate to Africa and to the Black Diaspora.

For its third edition which will be published in December 2020, Ọyẹ will be focusing on the language, literature and popular culture of Ekiti State.

We are especially interested in submissions with an interdisciplinary focus. Papers might examine, but are not limited to the following issues:

Montage of a Dream Deferred: Projecting Langston Hughes's Vision During Covid-19: A Special Issue of The Langston Hughes Review

updated: 
Sunday, June 7, 2020 - 10:34pm
The Langston Hughes Review
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Recently, in an epic #Verzuz battle organized by producer Swizz Beatz and rapper-producer Timbaland, the Grammy-Award winning singers Erykah Badu and Jill Scott appeared on Instagram live. Therein Scott invoked Langston Hughes as an inspirational artist, pointing to the poet’s continued popularity in the twenty-first century, especially during #Covid19. For countless African Americans, the death tolls from the virus, inadequate health care, unemployment, and white supremacist bigotry epitomize Hughes’s notion of the dream deferred. Video footage released May 26, 2020, showed officer Derek Chauvin of the Minneapolis Police Department kneeling on Floyd’s neck for at least seven minutes in broad daylight. Floyd died afterward.

Representations of Refugee, Migrant, and Displaced Motherhood in a Global Context

updated: 
Saturday, June 6, 2020 - 4:21pm
Maria Lombard
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 20, 2019

Call for Abstracts: Representations of Refugee, Migrant, and Displaced Motherhood in a Global Context

Seeking abstracts or unpublished chapters looking at literary accounts of Latina and/or Indigenous motherhood experiences in the context of migration and displacement to fill a gap in scholarly edited collection. 

 

Please submit a 250-400 word abstract of your chapter and a 50-word bio by June 20, 2019.

 

Accepted and complete chapters due 15 August 2019 (6,000 words maximum with MLA format and references) 

 

'I See You, I Hear You': Teaching Agency and Empowerment in Times of Crisis

updated: 
Friday, June 5, 2020 - 1:18pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2020

This session proposes a re-examination of the undergraduate student writer's concept of agency during times of crisis. We aim to expand our critical understanding of what it means to teach students in a way that empowers, offers agency, and acknowledges the voice of the student during times of crisis, whether such crisis is a result of a global pandemic such as Covid-19, national issues such as police brutality, or the result of a personal struggle such as anxiety or loss and, thus, we welcome contributions that address agency, empowerment, and voice from a variety of academic perspectives.

Investigating the Detective Genre Across Cultures and Mediums (NEMLA 2021)

updated: 
Friday, June 5, 2020 - 6:50am
Scott C. Thompson
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

 

Investigating the Detective Genre Across Cultures and Mediums

In the age of multi-platform streaming services, online gaming, and mass-market novels, the detective genre continues to be one of the most popular and successful narrative forms. The genre has cultivated an impressive intellectual half-life from its modern origins in the nineteenth century due to its ability to adapt to the needs of new cultures and mediums. From quiet English villages, to interactive space odysseys, to collaborative reimagining of World War II, the socio-cultural-temporal settings change, but what remains is the genre’s ability to smuggle cultural critiques into and through its narrative.

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