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"Modernism and Ordinary Language Philosophy" at MSA 11, Montréal, Québec, Nov 5-8, 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 2:40pm
Kevin Lamb (Columbia University)

J. L. Austin, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and Stanley Cavell have each influenced not only philosophy of language but also the practice of literary criticism. This panel invites papers addressing any aspect of the relation between these thinkers and modernism in the arts, from the mutual indebtedness of their philosophical writings and modernist aesthetics to the application of ordinary language philosophy procedures to the study of modernist writers. Please send 300-word abstracts and brief (2-3 sentence) bios to Kevin Lamb (KML2104@columbia.edu) by May 1, 2009.

The Spatial Significance of Native American Stories & Ideology [publication]

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 2:25pm
Catherine Rainwater, Cristine Soliz, Anna Lee Walters

We are now accepting submissions for a collection of stories, essays, and poems for a proposed book on comparative American spatial concepts, partially titled "Stories the Land Holds." The editors are looking for texts variously addressing "stories in the land." What are the stories the land tells? Vine Deloria has warned us of problems that result from a perspective that is not fundamentally spatial, and such has been the case for current problems that range from ecological disaster to fanatical environmentalism and bundled mortgages. We believe that these complex and problematic American events can be understood more fully from a Native American perspective.

The Spatial Significance of Native American Stories & Ideology [publication]

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 2:21pm
Catherine Rainwater, Cristine Soliz, Anna Lee Walters

We are now accepting submissions for a collection of stories, essays, and poems for a proposed book on comparative American spatial concepts, partially titled "Stories the Land Holds." The editors are looking for texts variously addressing "stories in the land." What are the stories the land tells? Vine Deloria has warned us of problems that result from a perspective that is not fundamentally spatial, and such has been the case for current problems that range from ecological disaster to fanatical environmentalism and bundled mortgages. We believe that these complex and problematic American events can be understood more fully from a Native American perspective.

The Spatial Significance of Native American Stories & Ideology [publication]

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 2:16pm
Catherine Rainwater, Cristine Soliz, Anna Lee Walters

We are now accepting submissions for a collection of stories, essays, and poems for a proposed book on comparative American spatial concepts, partially titled "Stories the Land Holds." The editors are looking for texts variously addressing "stories in the land." What are the stories the land tells? Vine Deloria has warned us of problems that result from a perspective that is not fundamentally spatial, and such has been the case for current problems that range from ecological disaster to fanatical environmentalism and bundled mortgages. We believe that these complex and problematic American events can be understood more fully from a Native American perspective.

CFP: Translation, Performance and Reception of Greek Drama, 1900-1950: International Dialogues. Comparative Drama Special Issue

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 1:36pm
Amanda Wrigley



Proposals are invited for essays on the translation, performance and reception of ancient Greek drama in the period between and around the two world wars—so, very broadly speaking 1900-1950.

Essays which have an international focus or dimension are particularly encouraged: for example, discussions of translations and adaptations which engage with international politics; considerations of intercontinental trends in Greek play performance; or essays on the various receptions of internationally touring productions (such as Max Reinhardt's Oedipus, 1910-12, Harley Granville-Barker and Lillah McCarthy's Amercian tour of Trojan Women and Iphigenia in Tauris, 1915).

Blowing Up Babel -- MSA 11 Nov 5-8 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 11:51am
Margaret Bruzelius / Smith College

for MSA 11 -- The Languages of Modernism, nov 5-8-2009

Blowing up Babel - escaping language in modernism
Margaret Bruzelius

Indian Popular Culture October 30-November 1, 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 10:30am
Midwest Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association

The Indian Popular Culture area of the Midwest Popular Culture and Midwest American Culture Association is now accepting proposals for its upcoming conference. The MPCA/MACA conference will be held Friday-Sunday, October 30-November 1, 2009 at the Westin Book Cadillac in Detroit, Michigan.

New Clear Forms: American Poetry and Cold War Culture, 11th and 12th September 2009 [DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS - 1ST MAY 2009]

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 9:43am
University of Glasgow

New Clear Forms is an international 2-day conference to be held at the University of Glasgow on 11th and 12th September 2009. It aims to explore the poetic responses to national and international affairs of this era, in a bid to further understand the deep and complex relations between propaganda and private consciousness, rebellion and art, nation and self.

We are currently inviting proposals for 20-minute papers that reflect on these themes. Topics may include but are by no means limited to:

New Clear Forms: American Poetry and Cold War Culture, 11th and 12th September 2009 [DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS - 1ST MAY 2009]

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 9:37am
University of Glasgow

New Clear Forms is an international 2-day conference to be held at the University of Glasgow on 11th and 12th September 2009. It aims to explore the poetic responses to national and international affairs of this era, in a bid to further understand the deep and complex relations between propaganda and private consciousness, rebellion and art, nation and self.

We are currently inviting proposals for 20-minute papers that reflect on these themes. Topics may include but are by no means limited to:

Second call for papers: Worlds in Dialogue

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 3:37am
A conference presented jointly by the Association of University English Teachers of Southern Africa (AUETSA), the South African Association for Commonwealth Language and Literature Studies (SAACLALS), the South African Society for General Literary studies

Second call for papers:
Worlds in Dialogue

A conference presented jointly by the Association of University English Teachers of Southern Africa (AUETSA), the South African Association for Commonwealth Language and Literature Studies (SAACLALS), the South African Society for General Literary studies (SAVAL), the 4th Conference on South African Children's and Youth Literature and the South African Association for Language Teaching (SAALT).

Hosts: The School of Languages
and the Research Unit: Languages and literature in the South African context
Dates: 8-11 July 2009
Venue: North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus), Potchefstroom, South Africa

Final deadline for abstracts: 31 May 2009

Second call for papers: Worlds in Dialogue

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 3:34am
A conference presented jointly by the Association of University English Teachers of Southern Africa (AUETSA), the South African Association for Commonwealth Language and Literature Studies (SAACLALS), the South African Society for General Literary studies

Second call for papers:
Worlds in Dialogue

A conference presented jointly by the Association of University English Teachers of Southern Africa (AUETSA), the South African Association for Commonwealth Language and Literature Studies (SAACLALS), the South African Society for General Literary studies (SAVAL), the 4th Conference on South African Children's and Youth Literature and the South African Association for Language Teaching (SAALT).

Hosts: The School of Languages
and the Research Unit: Languages and literature in the South African context
Dates: 8-11 July 2009
Venue: North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus), Potchefstroom, South Africa

Final deadline for abstracts: 30 April 2009

ACE 2009 - The Asian Conference on Education, October 24-25 2009, Osaka, Japan

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 7:45pm
ACE 2009/IAFOR

ACE 2009

The aim of ACE is to encourage academics and scholars to meet and exchange ideas and views in a forum encouraging respectful dialogue.

The conference will bring together a number of university scholars working throughout Japan, Asia, and beyond to share ideas. ACE will afford the opportunity for renewing old acquaintances, making new contacts, and networking across higher education.

It is hoped that academics working in Japan and Asia will be encouraged to forge working relationships with each other, as well as with colleagues from Europe and the US, facilitating partnerships across borders.

Theme

[UPDATE] ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL LITERATURE

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 6:51pm
Brian Jones

The Encyclopedia of American Environmental Literature (forthcoming from Facts on File in 2010), is seeking contributors for entries on a wide variety of authors and works, including a host of America's most important authors, and works of poetry, fiction and non-fiction. Details, including a list of available entries as well as samples and guidelines, can be found at

http://enviroencyclopedia.blogspot.com/

CPF: Apocalyptic Belief and the Internet (Abstracts May 1)

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 5:30pm
Robert Glenn Howard

DEADLINE May 1, 2009

CALL FOR BOOK CHAPTER PROPOSALS
(Please distribute widely, and my apologies for any cross-posting.)

Network Apocalypse: Visions of the End in an Age of Internet Media

European Shakespeares and Asia - 31 May 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 5:10pm
Alexander Huang / Penn State University

Local/Global Shakespeares: 4th British Shakespeare Association Conference

King's College London & Shakespeare's Globe
11 – 13 September 2009

Seminar: Asian Shakespeares in Europe

Victorian Network - Recruiting Postgraduate Peer-Reviewers

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 5:07pm
Katharina Boehm / Victorian Network

Victorian Network - Recruiting Postgraduate Peer-Reviewers

The Victorian Network, an online journal dedicated to publishing and promoting the best postgraduate work in Victorian Studies, is recruiting postgraduate peer-reviewers for a themed issue on "The British Empire and Victorian Literature and Culture". We are looking for doctoral students who are interested in gaining experience and developing career-relevant skills in the publishing process. As peer-reviewer for Victorian Network, you
will screen and blind-review a manuscript article and produce a short evaluation report. Peer-reviewing for the current issue is scheduled for the period between 20 May and 10 June.

[UPDATE] Extended Deadline for Submissions to Southern Women Writers Conference

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 3:50pm
Southern Women Writers Conference

Call for Papers and Creative Submissions
Eighth Biennial Southern Women Writers Conference
Berry College
Mount Berry, GA
September 24-26, 2009

Conference speakers to include: Judith Ortiz Cofer, Allison Hedge Coke, Natalie Daise, Thulani Davis, Connie May Fowler, Sarah Gordon, Melissa Fay Greene, Sharyn McCrumb, Marsha Norman, Mab Segrest, and Natasha Trethewey

Since its inception in 1994, the Southern Women Writers Conference has been devoted to showcasing the works of well known and emerging southern women writers, expanding the literary canon, and developing critical and theoretical understandings of traditions and innovations in southern women's writing.

"Dark Migrations: Territorializing the Savage Body" MMLA November 12-15 2009, abstract due April 20.

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 3:38pm
Jeff Aziz, University of Pittsburgh

This panel invites papers that engage with narratives that problematize the dominant American narrative of migration into the "savage" West. For instance, In Jim Jarmusch's 1995 film Dead Man, the Native American Xebeche is captured and shipped east by railroad caged as an animal in a sort of counter-migration, even as European settlers travel west into the territories from which his relatives are being displaced. Of particular interest are papers that explore the relationship between suffering, objectified, or commodified bodies and American landscape.

[UPDATE] Melmoth, a journal of Victorian Gothic, Decadence and Sensation 30/04/09

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 2:28pm
Sondeep Kandola, University of Leeds

The inaugural issue of Melmoth, a journal of the Victorian Gothic, Decadence and Sensation, one of The Oscholars family of internet journals, will be published at the end of April. If colleagues have any CFPs, forthcoming events, publications, or news on any of the aforementioned topics that they would like to promote, then please send all relevant material to the following email address:

melmoth_journal@livemail.co.uk

Please let me have all relevant material by Thursday 30th April, 2009.

Sondeep Kandola,
University of Leeds,
Editor, Melmoth.

Actants, Actors, Agents - A Comparison Between Languages and Theories of Action

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 12:45pm
University of Turin

Lexia (New Series) is a semiannual journal edited by the semioticians of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Turin, Italy, and published by Aracne, Rome.

The second issue of 2009 will be devoted to the theme "Actants, actors, agents: a comparison between languages and theories of action". Part of the volume will contain the proceedings of the roundtable about this topic organized in Turin on December 3, 2008 (with contributions by Marina Sbisà, Ugo Volli, Guido Ferraro, Maurizio Ferraris, etc.). The second part of the volume will contain essays and articles sent to the editor, and selected through a double blind peer review process.

Semiotics of Revelation

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 12:41pm
International Association for Semiotic Studies

The roundtable will focus on the semiotic implications of the idea of revelation. What are the characteristics of meaning that is produced, communicated, and received as "revealed"? Are there anthropological, or even bio-logical constants in such characteristics, or do they rather vary according to socio-cultural contexts and historical époques? What terms express the idea of revelation in the different natural languages, and with which semantic connotations? What values are attributed to the idea of a revelation of meaning, and what, on the contrary, to a meaning that is non-revealed? What relations of rupture, or tension, obtain between these different valorizations? Through what narratives is the idea of a revealed meaning elaborated?

"Imagining Frontiers: Identity and Movement in Early American Literature" M/MLA; 4/15/09; 11/12-15/09

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 12:33pm
Sean Kelly, Wilkes University

"Imagining Frontiers: Identity and Movement in Early American Literature." In keeping with the conference theme, "Migration," this panel will examine the ways in which the issues of emigration, migration, expansion, and settlement in early American literature, from William Bradford's depictions of landing in Plymouth to James Fennimore Cooper's novelistic representations of the frontier, inform constructions of personal and national identity.

Symposium on Literature and Religious Conflict in the English Renaissance, May 24-27, 2010, The University of Texas at Austin.

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 11:41am
Texas Institute for Literary and Textual Studies

The Texas Institute for Literary and Textual Studies is pleased to announce its first annual Symposium. Scholars whose research concerns any aspect of the Symposium topic are invited to send proposals to the Directors of the Institute. (Applicants should feel free to interpret both "literature" and "religious conflict" in broad terms.)

Southern Appalachian Student Conference on Literature, 4/30/09; 9/26/09

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 11:23am
East Tennessee State University, Drs. Katherine Weiss and Thomas Alan Holmes

The Third Annual Southern Appalachian Student Conference on Literature (SASCOL) is seeking papers dealing with any aspect of literature and/or film. Papers should be no longer than 10 pages (15 minutes reading time) and should be a scholarly work. We are not accepting creative writing.

This student conference is open to undergraduate and graduate students.

Keynote Speaker: Amy Kaufman of Wesleyan College, scholar of Medieval Literature.

The conference will be held at Culp Center on the ETSU campus in Johnson City, TN on Saturday, September 26, 2009.

Registration fee: $30 (registration covers keynote banquet).

Transnational/Global Beats

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 10:33am
Nancy Grace & Jennie Skerl

Call For Papers
Transnational/Global Beats: A Collection of Essays
Editors: Jennie Skerl and Nancy Grace
Deadline for abstracts: June 1, 2009

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

New Voices 2009: The Literature and Rhetoric of the Apocalypse (October 22-24, 2009) [GRADUATE]

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 9:26am
New Voices Conference: Georgia State University Graduate English Assoc.

The 10th Annual New Voices Graduate Student Conference focuses on representations of the Apocalypse as they manifest throughout history, across cultures, and in language. The conference committee invites papers dealing with any aspect of mankind's conception of the End-of-Days. Individual papers or panel proposals may center upon any time period and any culture or people. They may furthermore draw thematically from such academic disciplines as literary criticism and theory, poetry, fiction, philosophy, religious studies, medieval and renaissance studies, art history, biblical history, cultural geography, and folklore.

"Between Modernism and the Lyric" at MSA 11, Montréal, Québec, Nov 5-8, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 8:17am
Reena Sastri

Current work on lyric often sets Romantic interiority against postmodernist models of how language shapes the subject from without. Lyric is understood either through its traditional association with the expressive self, or through the ability of its formal features to highlight its status as literary language and suggest the alterity of all language. These discussions tend to elide or misrepresent distinctively modernist engagements with the relation of subjectivity to poetry.

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