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Trump Fiction (NeMLA)

updated: 
Friday, June 16, 2017 - 12:05pm
49th annual NeMLA convention in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (April 12-15, 2018)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Donald Trump was a public figure long before he became President of the United States, one who became familiar to American audiences through his appearances in a wide variety of media over a period of several decades.  While much has been made of Trump’s selling of himself to the American public in branded productions that identified him as their author or producer, ranging from books such as Trump:  The Art of the Deal to his reality-TV Apprentice franchise, less attention has been paid to the treatment of Trump in works of fiction produced by authors other than Trump.  This panel will examine the treatment of Trump and his fictional analogues in films, television programs, and literature, with an emphasis on works that took up the subj

[Deadline extended] Melodrama: Home is Where the Heart Is

updated: 
Friday, June 16, 2017 - 11:16am
2017 Film & History Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 1, 2017

CFP: Melodrama: Home is Where the Heart Is

An area of multiple panels for the 2017 Film & History Conference Representing “Home”: The Real and Imagined Spaces of Belonging November 1-November 5, 2017

The Hilton Milwaukee City Center

Milwaukee, WI (USA)

DEADLINE for abstracts: July 1, 2017

Thinking of Difference: Critical Approaches to Narratives of the Non-human

updated: 
Friday, June 16, 2017 - 10:57am
NeMLA 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

This panel seeks to investigate particular narrative strategies of describing the non-human experience in literature, drama, philosophy, and art throughout the ages (not simply the 21st century). Papers for this panel are invited to reflect the following questions: how are ideas of the non-human transmitted in literature, art, and other media and how can we assess them? What trends, novel methods, gaps, or fallbacks are present as humans attempt to understand the other? Further, how do narrative strategies across media or time periods compare or contrast?

Possible approaches to investigating narrative strategies may include but are non limited to:

-Evocations and portrayals of the non-human in literatures

Caped Crusaders: Re-'fashioning' Superheroes in the 21st Century

updated: 
Friday, June 16, 2017 - 10:57am
NeMLA 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Whether in print, film, or other media, the superhero costume invites audiences into another world. From Batman’s cowl to Wonder Woman’s tiara, a superhero's costume creates an ethos that cultivates collective imaginaries of a particular character’s power, their reputation, and their iconography. While heroic dress does not always define the hero, it does play a certain part in constructing the identities of characters throughout time. This panel seeks to investigate and dissect the aesthetics of superhero dress and how their costumes have been adapted for the 21st century. Participants are invited to reflect on the following questions: What role does fashion play in the adaptation and re-imagining of heroes?

CFP: Edited Collection Preserving U.S. History--Memorializing Contested Events

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 1:07pm
Melissa M. Bender, University Writing Program, University of California, Davis; Klara Stephanie Szlezák, American Studies, University of Passau, Germany
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 7, 2017

Conflicts over (mis)representations of historical events have long been a concern of scholars in multiple disciplines. However, the recent shift in the U.S. political climate—most notably, the shift from the Obama to the Trump administration—warrants fresh approaches to the ways in which historical preservation is practiced. To this end, we seek proposals for essays to be included in an edited volume exploring the manner in which U.S. history is preserved, sanitized, or contested through monuments, memorial sites, museums, and print or audio-visual texts.

 

CFP IMPRESSIONS

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 10:44am
IMPRESSIONS
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 30, 2017

Research Papers on World Literature deadline for submissions: June 30, 2017 full name / name of organization: Impressions : A Bi-Annual Refereed Journal of English Studies contact email: impressionsonline@gmail.com 

ImpressionsA Bi-Annual Refereed Journal of English Studies ISSN 0974-892X

Dear Readers,

 

The latest issue of Impressions  (Vol. XI, Issue I, January 2017) is now accessible at www.impressions.org.in.

Humanities for STEM: Using Archives to Bridge the Two Culture Divide (proposals due Sept. 15, 2017 for symposium in New York City, April 2018)

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 10:43am
Humanities for STEM Research Collaborative
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

Call for PapersHumanities for STEMUsing Archives to Bridge the Two Culture DivideHumanities for STEM Research Collaborative Symposium | New York University | April 6-7, 2018 

CFP Deadline: Friday, September 15, 2017

Humanities for STEM is a research collaborative at New York University that focuses on how the study of primary sources, archival research, and associated methodologies of the humanities can be used to enhance the understanding of science (including medicine), technology, engineering, and mathematics. We are convening a symposium in April 2018 and seek papers from faculty, librarians, archivists, and others along this theme.

Il carcere come spazio letterario

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 10:42am
Filomena Fantarella
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Dear All, please consider submitting an abstract for the panel "Il carcere come spazio letterario" that will be held during the next NeMLA Annual Convention - April 12-15, 2018 Pittsburgh, PA The aim of this panel is to explore the idea of prison as a literary space.

Food and Feast in Premodern Outlaw Tales (edited collection)

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 10:41am
Editors: Melissa Ridley Elmes and Kristin Bovaird-Abbo
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

We seek papers to round out an exciting collection of essays on the subject of “food and feast in premodern outlaw tales.” Although we are happy to consider abstracts on Middle English outlaws, we are especially interested in work that considers topics related to food and/or feasting in the following areas: pre-Conquest English, medieval Scandinavian, medieval continental, or early modern outlaws in history, literature, and/or culture. We welcome essays from any discipline. Please send an author bio and abstract for a 6,000-8,000 word essay to Melissa Ridley Elmes at MElmes@lindenwood.edu by August 1, 2017.

Deconstructing Islamophobia

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 10:41am
Katelynn Phillips
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 30, 2017

Call for Papers

                                                                                                                Deconstructing Islamophobia Conference

September 16 and 17, 2017

At Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green OH

 

Please submit a 250-300 word abstract for a 15-minute paper, musical performance, short film, or creative presentation by June 30, 2017 at:

https://bgsu.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_eL1sAdYvJO1CsjH

Teaching American Literature: A Journal of Theory and Practice; October 31, 2014

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 10:38am
Patricia Bostian/Central Piedmont Community College
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Teaching American Literature: A Journal of Theory and Practice (TALTP), a peer-reviewed open source online journal, is accepting articles for our Winter 2014 special issue, Who Is Teaching U.S.? We are interested in articles by instructors and their experiences in teaching American literature in countries outside the United States. How are the classic and contemporary American authors taught and received in other countries? What are the difficulties? The benefits? Any issue pertaining to teaching American literature is welcome, from assignment creation, gender issues, difficulties with translations, to first-hand accounts of both successes and failures.

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