Subscribe to american

american

New Deadline: "Archives and the Management of Sex" at PAMLA Nov. 11-13

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 3:24pm
full name / name of organization: 
Pacific Ancient Modern Language Association 2016 (Pasadena, CA)
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 1, 2016

This panel will explore how institutions dedicated to the collection, preservation, and circulation of material knowledge manage sexuality. Sex materials create conflicting imperatives for librarians. As one collections curator at the New York Public Library recently told a reporter, "We needed to collect life as it was lived… It was always part of our mandate." Yet librarians at NYPL also had a mandate to protect the mass of pornographic magazines, pulp novels, and fliers they collected by carefully regulating access to them. Until recently, sex materials at NYPL labeled with three stars required supervision. That one example illustrates how sequestration generally determines who can read about sex and under what conditions.

Comparative Imperialisms and Transnational Violence (Panel NeMLA 2017)

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 1:15pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) 2017
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Abstracts for papers are requsted for the panel "Comparative Imperialisms and Transnational Violence" at the 48th NeMLA Annual Convention, March 23-26, 2017, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Please follow this link to read the CFP on NeMLA webpage: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/16481

The Female Science Fiction Western (Abstracts due July 23, 2016; collection of essays)

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 12:13pm
full name / name of organization: 
Melanie A. Marotta / Kolin Ford
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 23, 2016

We are seeking original, previously unpublished essays for a collection tentatively titled The Science Fiction Western: Representation of Female Characters in the Late Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Media. In reference to historians' accounts of the frontier, Susan Armitage writes that "Women are either absent or incidental to the story". While women may have been attracted to the Frontier Myth concept, they are infrequently the main focus of American Western stories. Adult males, however, appeared prominently within literature in connection to this myth.

UPDATE - new deadline - PAMLA 2016 (Nov. 11-13, 2016) in Pasadena, CA

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 12:07pm
full name / name of organization: 
Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association (PAMLA)
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 1, 2016

2016 PAMLA Conference Extended Paper Proposal List: Friday, July 1 Deadline

The following sessions are still in search of paper proposals. Sessions may be added to this list over the next few weeks, so do check back regularly. You have until July 1 to propose to any of these sessions.

Go here to submit a paper proposal: http://www.pamla.org/2016/topic-areas

For a list of extended sessions go here: http://www.pamla.org/news/2016/06/18/2016-pamla-conference-extended-pape...

CFP: The Comics of Alison Bechdel (edited collection; DEADLINE December 1, 2016)

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 12:01pm
full name / name of organization: 
Janine Utell
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016

Call for Papers

The Comics of Alison Bechdel:  From the Outside In

 

“The Comics of Alison Bechdel:  From the Outside In” is a proposed volume in the series Critical Approaches to Comics Artists at the University Press of Mississippi.  This volume will contain an array of critical essays on the comics of Alison Bechdel, offering new examinations of her entire body of work. 

 

NeMLA 2017: Literary Form and its Limit: Marxism, Poststructuralism, and Description

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:37am
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) 2017
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

The legacies of both Marxism and poststructuralism have loomed large in literary studies in recent years. The ongoing publication of the late seminars of both Foucault and Derrida, as well as the long awaited translation of Althusser’s On The Reproduction Of Capitalism suggests a sustained interest in such methodologies, while what has been called the “descriptive turn”—which encompasses practices as disparate and ill-defined as Latourian Actor-Network Theory, Morettian “distant reading”, and Heather Love’s revival of “thin description”—has attempted to caution scholars away from symptomatic reading, ideology critique, and broadly “deconstructive” critical practice.

“13th International Spanish Association for American Studies (SAAS) Conference. Understanding (Human) Nature”

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:32am
full name / name of organization: 
Spanish Association for American Studies (SAAS)
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 1, 2017

13th International SAAS Conference
Understanding (Human) Nature

University of Extremadura, 5 - 7 April 2017

 

Call for Papers

Abstracts are invited for the 13th International Conference of the Spanish Association for American Studies, which will be hosted by the University of Extremadura, in Cáceres. The thematic focus of this conference will focus on the understanding of (human) nature.

Poetry and History

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:28am
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA 2017, March 23-26, Baltimore
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

A reviewer of Claudia Rankine's Citizen writes, "one problem with writing poetry about political or historical issues is that poetry proves a terrible method for transmitting information."  This is an assertion we have encountered before.  Regarding Ezra Pound's Cantos, Donald Davie writes, "Whatever more long-term effect Pound's disastrous career may have on American and British poetry, it seems inevitable that it will rule out (has ruled out already, for serious writers) any idea that poetry can or should operate in the dimensio of history, trying to make sense of the recorded past by redressing our historical perspectives. . . .

Baltimore and the Emergence of the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Friday, June 24, 2016 - 3:31pm
full name / name of organization: 
Lena Ampadu/Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA)
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Baltimore, Maryland, has been the home of several important African American authors, including Frederick Douglass and Frances E. W. Harper.  In addition to these major writers who influenced the emergence of African American protest literature of the tumultuous nineteenth century, there are several other significant writers of prose and poetry who have lived in the city and created African American literature. Notable examples include Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, Waters Turpin, Eugenia Collier, and Lucille Clifton.

American Fiction after Postmodernism @ NeMLA 2017

updated: 
Tuesday, June 21, 2016 - 3:46pm
full name / name of organization: 
Christopher K. Coffman
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

For many readers, the notion that Cold War or pre-9/11 postmodernist fiction is essentially the same as post-9/11 fiction is a problematic one. Such notable critics of postmodernist writing as Linda Hutcheon and Brian McHale have suggested as much, and a wide variety of recent work (Green, 2005; Toth and Brooks, 2007; Burn, 2008; Nealon, 2012; Holland, 2014; and so forth) by other figures has bolstered their assertions. Consequently, the nature of post-postmodernist fiction has become a topic of significant interest.

Flash Fiction: Theory and Practice

updated: 
Tuesday, June 21, 2016 - 3:46pm
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Flash fiction is as old as Aesop’s fables, as recent as microfiction on blogs. But what works best in a limited space, who are some of the best practitioners of this brief form, and why? Is there an emerging praxis or theory for writing and teaching flash fiction as there once was for short stories? Any fresh angle on this subgenre is welcome, but preferably with an emphasis on analysis and technique and something intrinsic to the form, not just a reading of a particular short short story. 300-word abstracts, please, to https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/16145

Kaiju and Pop Culture Anthology

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 10:15am
full name / name of organization: 
Camille D. G. Mustachio
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 1, 2016

Kaiju is a familiar trope in film and television that places giant monsters in direct conflict with fellow monsters and/or everyday citizens. While a larger-than-life creature that attacks Tokyo is likely the most familiar form of kaiju, additional iterations include apes, dragons, dinosaurs, and even robots.  Kaiju as a genre has evolved along with cinema; technical developments no longer require men stomping around in rubber costumes as CGI enables bigger and more frightening monsters to haunt our screens. With a timeless kitsch quality, kaiju is solidly placed within our collective pop culture psyche.

Pages