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Scandalous Spaces - SAMLA 92 (2020)

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 11:50am
SAMLA / South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 1, 2020

SAMLA 92: Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts - November 13-15, 2020: Virtual Conference through Accelevents

 

Scandalous Spaces (Modernist Literature)

Muslims in America (extended deadline for panel)

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 12:57pm
Dr. Mahwash Shoaib / SAMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 30, 2020

  Panel at the South Atlantic Modern Languages Association / SAMLA 92 Conference

This panel intends to examine the works of Muslim American poets, novelists, playwrights, jazz musicians, punks, hip hop artists, filmmakers, and visual artists.

(CFP: PAMLA 2020) Poetry and Poetics

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 11:48am
Toshiaki Komura / Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

The Poetry and Poetics standing session at the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) seeks abstract submissions exploring any aspect of poetry and poetics. We are open to paper topics that encompass a wide range of subgenres, time periods, and critical approaches; in particular, we are interested in papers that engage with the PAMLA special conference theme of "City of God, City of Destruction."

History and Technology in Contemporary American Literature

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 11:46am
Liliana Naydan / NeMLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

As Carroll Pursell suggests in Technology in Postwar America, technology enabled America to develop global prominence in the 20th century. And in seems poised to do the same in the 21st. Yet the relationship Americans have with technology is thorny. For instance, Thomas L. Friedman lauds technology, observing that “Globalization 3.0,” a new era in global history that is marked by digital developments, is leveling the playing field (The World is Flat 10).

Reform and Social Justice in 19th-century American Literature

updated: 
Friday, July 31, 2020 - 10:14am
Northeast Modern Language Association/NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

19th-century America was the site of various reform movements: antislavery, women's rights, education, temperance, penal reform, et al.

Special Issue of American Literature: How Literature Understands Poverty

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 11:41am
Clare Callahan
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020

This special issue examines the role of literature and criticism in addressing poverty and dispossession. In a 2009 Inside Higher Ed op-ed, Keith Gandal predicted that the economic crisis would lead to literary studies finally putting “poverty near the top of the agenda and the center of the field.” Ten years later, poverty has become a focus of scholarship in the social sciences, particularly geography, anthropology, sociology, and critical legal studies. Yet the topic remains stubbornly marginal to literary studies, even though qualitative social scientific methods have been taken up in the discipline as never before.

Modernism and the Politics of Contradiction

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 11:41am
Matthew Mersky/ Boston College
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Political contradiction is written all over modernism. No other literary historical period seems quite as striven between the static, apolitical or even conservative outlook of its various key figures on the one hand, and the explosive and even revolutionary formal potential on the other. Woolf’s classism, for example, is met by her quasi-revolutionary declaration that “in or about December, 1910, human character changed.” No literary period so vehemently defines itself against mass culture while also expressing unbridled democratic impulses. Joyce’s defense of autonomous art is met by the opposite impulse in Ulysses to forge an aesthetic of the everyday.

Oil & Water: Petroculture & the Blue Humanities in Conversation

updated: 
Friday, June 19, 2020 - 11:30am
NEMLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Signs of the prominence of oil as an object of study in the Environmental Humanities abound: the increasing circulation of terms like “Petroculture” and “petrocapital,” the emergence of the Energy Humanities as a sub-field, and the nearly simultaneous publication of recent volumes such as Living Oil (2016); Petrocultures (2017); and Energy Humanities: An Anthology (2017). Scholars in a range of disciplines are working to theorize and bring into focus the myriad economic, environmental, social, and imaginative ramifications of our relationship with—and dependence on—oil.

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