Subscribe to american

american

Duality and Duplicity in African-American Literature

updated: 
Sunday, June 5, 2016 - 3:52am
Bruce Plourde/Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

The idea that African-Americans are actual and full-fledged citizens of the United States is not a new one; the racism that prevents that idea to flourish is also not new.  Recent events, including the death of Freddie Carlos Gray, Jr. in Baltimore, have brought to the fore the question of whether or not the United States values its black citizens, and extends to them the same rights as it does to its non-black citizens.  The historical record has much to say on this point, but the literary record also is instructive in perceptions of race in the United States. 

2016 John R. Milton Writers' Conference

updated: 
Sunday, June 5, 2016 - 3:49am
University of South Dakota
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 15, 2016

CALLS FOR PAPERS AND CREATIVE PRESENTATIONS

JOHN R. MILTON WRITERS' CONFERENCE:

POSSIBLE IMPOSSIBILITIES / IMPOSSIBLE POSSIBILITIES:

GEOGRAPHIC, AESTHETIC, GENDERED, RACIAL, AND HISTORICAL FRONTIERS

OCTOBER 27-29, 2016

THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH DAKOTA, VERMILLION, SOUTH DAKOTA

 

CFP: Possible Impossibilities / Impossible Possibilities: Geographic, Aesthetic, Gendered, Racial, and Historical Frontiers (7/15/16; The University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota, October 27-29, 2016) 

Closed and Open Rhetoric: American Formalist Literary Criticism of the 1950s

updated: 
Sunday, June 5, 2016 - 3:48am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Panel for the 2017 NeMLA Annual Convention in Baltimore, Maryland (Marriott Waterfront, March 23-26, 2017). Deadline Sept. 30, notification no later than October 15, 2016.

Abstracts must be submitted online to: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/User/Dashboard

Membership in NeMLA required.

Description of Panel:

Children and Childhood Studies Area, MAPACA (Nov. 3-5, 2016) - DEADLINE June 30, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, June 5, 2016 - 3:48am
Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016

Children and Childhood Studies (CCS) focuses on the societal, cultural, and political forces that shape the lives of children and the concept of childhood contemporaneously and throughout history. CCS research may originate in any discipline, including: the humanities, the behavioral and social sciences, or the hard sciences. We especially encourage multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary research.

*Deadline Extension* Marxist Literary Group @ SAMLA88

updated: 
Sunday, June 5, 2016 - 3:47am
Marxist Literary Group Affiliated Panel @ SAMLA88
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 9, 2016

The Marxist Literary Group welcomes a wide range of paper proposals concerning Marxism, but papers addressing the SAMLA 88 theme (Utopia/Dystopia) are especially welcome. Interested panelists should submit a 250 word abstract and any A/V requirements to Emma C. Baughman, University of Rhode Island, at emmacbaughman@gmail.com by June 9, 2016. 

Thoreau from across the pond

updated: 
Friday, June 3, 2016 - 9:41am
Julien Nègre / ENS de Lyon, France
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

International Symposium

October 19-20, 2017

École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

 

Thoreau from across the pond

 

Organized by Julien Nègre (ENS de Lyon)

François Specq (ENS de Lyon)

and Laura Dassow Walls (University of Notre Dame)

 

CFP Abstracts: TV Network Execs, Producers, and Performers: Clashes over Television

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:52pm
David Pierson/2016 History and Film Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 15, 2016

From imperious TV network executives to “golden gut” programmers, star performers, influential independent producers, broadcast and cable TV mavericks, and auteurist showrunners—all of these individuals have struggled to leave their mark on mainstream and alternative television. From the early pioneering days of network television in the 1940s to the present-day hypercompetitive, multiplatform TV program milieu, these figures have strived to interpret and comprehend public taste in order to produce and distribute programming that satisfies a wide range of audiences, advertisers, and subscribers. 

 

Updated CFP--The American Graphic Short Story--A Symposium of the American Literature Association

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:07pm
Society for the Study of the American Short Story
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 1, 2016

The Society for the Study of the American Short Story seeks papers for a panel on the American graphic short story to be held at an international symposium on the short story. The conference will convene in Savannah, October 20-22, 2016, at the Hyatt Hotel.

Going Back to Roots: Revisiting the Groundbreaking Miniseries

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:06pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

The broadcast of the miniseries adaptation of Alex Haley’s Roots, which aired in January of 1977, became a ratings bonanza, a cultural touchstone, and a defining moment in the representation of African Americans in popular media. 40 years later, the impact of Alex Haley’s novel and the ABC miniseries continues to be felt, most notably in the recent History Channel “reboot” of the miniseries, but also in less obvious but more profound ways.

Literary Totalities

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 12:06pm
Kurt Cavender, Brandeis University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

One legacy of literary studies’ long love affair with post-structuralism has been a continuing reluctance to engage the concept of totality except in order to contest or deconstruct it. Two exceptions that prove this general trend are capitalism and ecology, and one could argue that it is precisely because both are still arguably acceptable as totalizing concepts that they continue to serve as productive sites of inquiry. Beyond these two instances, however, totality seems to have gone the way of closely related relics of Western metaphysics such as universality, objectivity, and the absolute: a conceptual category to be taken seriously only by the naive, dogmatic, or otherwise insufficiently critical reader.

[UPDATE - Deadline Extended] Chapter Proposals For the book "Ideological Messaging and the Role of Political Literature"

updated: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 11:56am
Önder Çakırtaş-IGI Global- http://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/call-details/2166
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016

http://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/call-details/2166

This book project tries to produce an outline for the diversification of literature and political writings. The book covers many disciplines ranging from political literature, gender politics, identity politics, minority politics, to ideologized writing, censorship, rhetoric and aestheticism of politics, and gendered literature.

Actor-Network Theory and the Latourian Turn in American Literary Studies

updated: 
Wednesday, June 1, 2016 - 9:51am
Geoff Bender/Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

In their essay “Surface Reading: An Introduction,” Stephen Best and Sharon Marcus famously trouble the premises of ideological critique.   Far from enacting political revolution, Best and Marcus contend, critique’s generally “excessive emphasis on ideological demystification” tends to lose the very object it aims to interpret in a welter of theoretical argument that the literary object ultimately must serve.  To recenter the literary object in scholarship, Best and Marcus suggest, among other strategies, a reconception of the role of critic à la sociologist Bruno Latour.  For Latour, the critic “is not the one who debunks, but the one who assembles”—most powerfully through what he calls Actor-Network Theory.  As opposed to plumbing the depths of a text, A

Pages