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CFP: [American] The Green Nineteenth Century

updated: 
Wednesday, April 30, 2008 - 5:29pm
Christine Roth

Call for Papers
THE GREEN NINETEENTH CENTURY

30th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association
Milwaukee, Wisconsin March 26-28, 2009

UPDATE: [American] ALA: Female Sexuality in 20th-c. Southern Women Writers (5/12/08)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 30, 2008 - 1:45am
Tenley Gwen Bank

Soliciting abstracts for accepted panel at ALA in San Francisco (May
22-25), related to southern women writers’ treatment of their female
characters’ sexuality and its effect on the social environment of the
texts. Possible topics could address (but are not limited to) marital
structures, sexual awakening, race and sexuality, sexual stereotypes, the
relation of southern sexual mores to the rest of the US. Considerations of
canonical and non-canonical authors invited. Please submit 1-page abstract
and brief c.v. to Tenley Bank (tenleygwen_at_yahoo.com) as soon as possible,
as this cfp is to replace a panelist who had to withdraw his submission.

CFP: [American] Photography, Modernism, Feminism 5/7/08; MSA X 11/13-11/16/08

updated: 
Tuesday, April 29, 2008 - 2:21pm
Kimberly Lamm

Photography, Modernism, Feminism
 In her essay "From Clementina to Kasebier: The Photographic Attainment of
the ’Lady Amateur,’” art historian Carol Armstrong argues that
photographers such as Julia Margaret Cameron, Lady Hawarden Clementina, and
Gertrude Kasebier took astute advantage of photography's low place on art's
hierarchical scales to assert themselves as artists. The work of these
women, therefore, indirectly calls attention to the relationship between
photography and the emergence of feminism in the U.S. and Britain in the
nineteenth- and early twentieth- centuries. This panel seeks to bring
modernist literature composed by women into the relationship between

CFP: [American] 5/7/08; MSA X 11/13/08-11/16/08

updated: 
Monday, April 28, 2008 - 1:14am
Kimberly Lamm

Photography, Modernism, Feminism
 In her essay "From Clementina to Kasebier: The Photographic Attainment of
the ’Lady Amateur,’” art historian Carol Armstrong argues that
photographers such as Julia Margaret Cameron, Lady Hawarden Clementina, and
Gertrude Kasebier took astute advantage of photography's low place on art's
hierarchical scales to assert themselves as artists. The work of these
women, therefore, indirectly calls attention to the relationship between
photography and the emergence of feminism in the U.S. and Britain in the
nineteenth- and early twentieth- centuries. This panel seeks to bring
modernist literature composed by women into the relationship between

CFP: [American] Mystery, Thriller and Crime Fiction, MPCA

updated: 
Tuesday, April 22, 2008 - 5:16pm
Kathryn Edney

Reminder that the Mystery, Thriller and Crime Fiction area of the Midwest
Popular Culture Association is accepting proposals in any and all aspects
of mystery, thriller and crimefiction by April 30. Please send 100-200
word abstracts and contact information to Kathryn Edney:
tremperk_at_msu.edu.

The conference will be held in Cincinnati, Ohio, Friday-Sunday, October 3-
5, 2008. More information regarding the conference can be found at
www.mpcaaca.org.

UPDATE: [American] MSAX panel: Modernism and the Network Narrative

updated: 
Monday, April 21, 2008 - 9:50pm
Wesley Beal

Over the last quarter-century, the fields of critical theory have converged
on a common buzzword, connectivity, which has acted as the linking
mechanism for a constellation of divergent fields converging onto a common
objective. Corresponding to this surge of “connectivity theory” we also
see arise a distinctive “network narrative”â€" a subgenre that represents
human connectedness and its accompanying group formations. Together with
the boom in connectivity theory, these narratives mark a “connectivity
turn” that has defined the theoretical and literary production of the late
1900s and 2000s, with the network narrative exemplified in works like Don

CFP: [American] Americana: The Journal of American Popular Culture (1900-present)

updated: 
Friday, April 18, 2008 - 2:54am
Leslie Kreiner Wilson

Americana: The Journal of American Popular Culture (1900-present) invites
submissions for the spring 2008 edition. Attach essays on any aspect of
twenty or twenty-first century American Studies (literature, film,
television, music, sports etc.) and email them to
editor_at_americanpopularculture.com. Please visit the journal at
http://www.americanpopularculture.com/journal.htm for guidelines and past
issues.

CFP: [American] SLSA 2008 panel: Steampunk and Reiteration

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 6:23pm
Brian Croxall

As a lifestyle and a literary movement, steampunk can be both the act of
modding your laptop to look like and function as a Victorian artifact and
an act of imagining what London might have looked like had Charles
Babbage’s analytical engine been realized. Steampunk is the application of
nineteenth-century aesthetics to contemporary objects; it is the
speculative extension of technologies that actually existed; it is the
anachronistic importation of contemporary technologies into the
fictionalized past. In all cases, steampunk blurs boundaries: between
centuries, between technologies, and between origin and repetition.

CFP: [American] To Kill a Mocking Bird

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 3:06pm
Jon Mitchell

Proposals are sought for an edited collection of essays on Harper Lee's
novel "To Kill a Mocking Bird"

This influencial novel, though taught in many institutions, has received
very little critical attention.

This collection hopes to remedy this by collecting together essays that
explore the novel from a number of diverse perspectives.

Please send proposals to:

Dr Jon Mitchell
School of English, Media, and Theatre Studies
National University of Ireland, Maynooth
Co.Kildare
Ireland

jon.mitchell_at_nuim.ie

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