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CFP: The Comics of Alison Bechdel (edited collection; DEADLINE December 1, 2016)

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 12:01pm
full name / name of organization: 
Janine Utell
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016

Call for Papers

The Comics of Alison Bechdel:  From the Outside In

 

“The Comics of Alison Bechdel:  From the Outside In” is a proposed volume in the series Critical Approaches to Comics Artists at the University Press of Mississippi.  This volume will contain an array of critical essays on the comics of Alison Bechdel, offering new examinations of her entire body of work. 

 

NeMLA 2017: Literary Form and its Limit: Marxism, Poststructuralism, and Description

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:37am
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) 2017
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

The legacies of both Marxism and poststructuralism have loomed large in literary studies in recent years. The ongoing publication of the late seminars of both Foucault and Derrida, as well as the long awaited translation of Althusser’s On The Reproduction Of Capitalism suggests a sustained interest in such methodologies, while what has been called the “descriptive turn”—which encompasses practices as disparate and ill-defined as Latourian Actor-Network Theory, Morettian “distant reading”, and Heather Love’s revival of “thin description”—has attempted to caution scholars away from symptomatic reading, ideology critique, and broadly “deconstructive” critical practice.

“13th International Spanish Association for American Studies (SAAS) Conference. Understanding (Human) Nature”

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:32am
full name / name of organization: 
Spanish Association for American Studies (SAAS)
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 1, 2017

13th International SAAS Conference
Understanding (Human) Nature

University of Extremadura, 5 - 7 April 2017

 

Call for Papers

Abstracts are invited for the 13th International Conference of the Spanish Association for American Studies, which will be hosted by the University of Extremadura, in Cáceres. The thematic focus of this conference will focus on the understanding of (human) nature.

Poetry and History

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:28am
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA 2017, March 23-26, Baltimore
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

A reviewer of Claudia Rankine's Citizen writes, "one problem with writing poetry about political or historical issues is that poetry proves a terrible method for transmitting information."  This is an assertion we have encountered before.  Regarding Ezra Pound's Cantos, Donald Davie writes, "Whatever more long-term effect Pound's disastrous career may have on American and British poetry, it seems inevitable that it will rule out (has ruled out already, for serious writers) any idea that poetry can or should operate in the dimensio of history, trying to make sense of the recorded past by redressing our historical perspectives. . . .

Baltimore and the Emergence of the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Friday, June 24, 2016 - 3:31pm
full name / name of organization: 
Lena Ampadu/Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA)
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Baltimore, Maryland, has been the home of several important African American authors, including Frederick Douglass and Frances E. W. Harper.  In addition to these major writers who influenced the emergence of African American protest literature of the tumultuous nineteenth century, there are several other significant writers of prose and poetry who have lived in the city and created African American literature. Notable examples include Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, Waters Turpin, Eugenia Collier, and Lucille Clifton.

American Fiction after Postmodernism @ NeMLA 2017

updated: 
Tuesday, June 21, 2016 - 3:46pm
full name / name of organization: 
Christopher K. Coffman
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

For many readers, the notion that Cold War or pre-9/11 postmodernist fiction is essentially the same as post-9/11 fiction is a problematic one. Such notable critics of postmodernist writing as Linda Hutcheon and Brian McHale have suggested as much, and a wide variety of recent work (Green, 2005; Toth and Brooks, 2007; Burn, 2008; Nealon, 2012; Holland, 2014; and so forth) by other figures has bolstered their assertions. Consequently, the nature of post-postmodernist fiction has become a topic of significant interest.

Flash Fiction: Theory and Practice

updated: 
Tuesday, June 21, 2016 - 3:46pm
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Flash fiction is as old as Aesop’s fables, as recent as microfiction on blogs. But what works best in a limited space, who are some of the best practitioners of this brief form, and why? Is there an emerging praxis or theory for writing and teaching flash fiction as there once was for short stories? Any fresh angle on this subgenre is welcome, but preferably with an emphasis on analysis and technique and something intrinsic to the form, not just a reading of a particular short short story. 300-word abstracts, please, to https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/16145

Kaiju and Pop Culture Anthology

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 10:15am
full name / name of organization: 
Camille D. G. Mustachio
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 1, 2016

Kaiju is a familiar trope in film and television that places giant monsters in direct conflict with fellow monsters and/or everyday citizens. While a larger-than-life creature that attacks Tokyo is likely the most familiar form of kaiju, additional iterations include apes, dragons, dinosaurs, and even robots.  Kaiju as a genre has evolved along with cinema; technical developments no longer require men stomping around in rubber costumes as CGI enables bigger and more frightening monsters to haunt our screens. With a timeless kitsch quality, kaiju is solidly placed within our collective pop culture psyche.

Disability in Modernist Literature

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 9:11am
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Combining disability and modernist studies, this panel engages in current discourses on disability in modernist texts. The modernist moment, marked by war trauma, advances in psychology, and eugenics, is a rich area of inquiry for disability theory. Recent disability theory argues that representing disability is an effort to engage with the unknowable, which we also see in the modernist preoccupation with connection. Papers may address representations of disability in modernist texts and/ or how authors negotiated their disabilities.

For a full description and to submit an abstract, please visit https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/16375.

Comparative American Ethnic Literature

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 9:08am
full name / name of organization: 
Barbara Kitt Seidman/Linfield College
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 1, 2016

Proposal submissions are welcome for the standing panel on Comparative American Ethnic Literature in conjunction with the 114th Annual Conference of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) being held Nov. 11-13 in Pasadena, CA. 

The extended deadline for proposals is July 1, 2016.

This year's conferencee theme is "Archives, Libraries, and Properties" (to align with the wealth of archival and library resources in the Pasadena area).  However, the Comparative American Ethnic Literature panel is NOT restricted to discussions related to the conference theme.  All topics relevant to the standing panel focus on American Ethnic Literature are encouraged.

Narratives of the (Un)self: American Autothanatographers, 17th-21st centuries

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 9:08am
full name / name of organization: 
E-Rea, peer-reviewed journal of Aix-Marseille University's English and American Studies Unit, France
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 1, 2016

Since the 1980s-1990s, the terms “autopathography” and “autothanatography” have increasingly been used by the theorists of autobiography. Defined by Thomas Couser as “life writing that focuses on the single experience of critical illness” (“Introduction: The Embodied Self”, a/b: Auto/Biography Studies, vol.6, no 1, Spring 1991, 1), autopathography often— but not always—envisions death. The aporic term autothanatography, the writing of one’s own death, has provided a useful framework for the theorists interested in the relationships between writing, the self and death.

Literary Maryland in the American Imagination

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 8:57am
full name / name of organization: 
Anthony Dotterman/NeMLA Conference (March 23-26)
contact email: 
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

In her 1998 play How I Learned to Drive, Paula Vogel described Maryland as a place where “You can still imagine what how [it] used to be before the malls took over. This countryside was once dotted with farmhouses. From their porches, you could have witnessed the Civil War raging in the front fields.” Considering the preceding quotation—as well as Maryland’s geographical and figurative status as a border state between the North and South—in terms of America’s complicated racial and social history, the following panel invites scholars from a variety of disciplines to present on the representation of Maryland in the American consciousness at NeMLA's 2017 conference in Baltimore, Maryland (March 23rd-26th).

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