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Feeling (Un)American: Race and National Belonging in the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:55am
North East Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In his 1903 The Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois poses a question at the heart of the African-American literary tradition: “How does it feel to be a problem?” We see the question’s precursors in Walker’s Appeal, Douglass’ address on the Fourth of July, and Harper’s anti-slavery poetry. It reverberates in Hurston’s “How It Feels To Be Colored Me,” Ellison’s “black and blue,” Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, and Rankine’s Citizen. Taking up the affective relationship between race and national belonging, these texts ask us to contend with what it feels like to be black in a nation founded on anti-blackness. Indeed, as Baldwin and Coates make clear, the problem lies ever “between the world and me.”

 

"Philip Roth's Succes de Scandale" at ACLA (March 19-22, 2020)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:54am
The Philip Roth Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

The Philip Roth Society invites submissions for a seminar entitled “Philip Roth’s Succès de Scandale.” While the subject of “literature and scandal” seems to be an emerging trend within studies of European literature, relatively few academic works focus on American literature and scandal. Thus, this panel seeks to examine how Philip Roth, both the subject of scandal and one of its keenest interrogators, can shed new light on this conversation. 

Jesuits in Science Fiction: From James Blish to Walter Miller Jr. to today

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:48am
North East Modern Languages Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Roundtable CFP

Annual Northeast Modern Language Association

51st Annual Convention

Boston MA, March 5th - 8th, 2020

Mariott Copley Place

Host Institution: Boston University

 

Jesuits in Science Fiction: From James Blish & Walter Miller Jr. to Today

NeMLA Panel: 'The New Lost Generation': African American Expatriate Writers in Paris, 1945-60

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:45am
Courtney Mullis, Duquesne University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

NeMLA 2020: Boston, MA

http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

In his 1961 essay “The New Lost Generation,” James Baldwin argues that Europe gave the “new” African American expats of the late 1940s and the 1950s “the sanction, if one can accept it, to become oneself. No artist can survive without this acceptance. But rare indeed is the American artist who achieved this without first becoming a wanderer, and then, upon his return to his own country, the loneliest and most blackly distrusted of men.” Indeed, Baldwin asserts that African American expats in Paris gained a kind of liberation through their experience with a culture wholly unlike their own.

The Texas Center for Working-Class Studies Sixth Annual Conference

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:43am
Collin College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 15, 2019

The Texas Center for Working-Class Studies, housed at Collin College, a two-year institution serving Collin County, is pleased to announce a one-day Working-Class Studies conference for interested scholars and students. The conference will consist of panels in a range of disciplines and on a variety of issues related to social class and labor issues, both historical and contemporary. The keynote speaker will be noted scholar Barbara Jensen, author ofReading Classes: On Culture and Classism in America. Jensen, also a licensed community and counseling psychologist, has been examining and teaching about working-class cultures and classism for over thirty years.

Shaping Identity in Ezra Pound's Poetry

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:43am
Jeff Grieneisen / Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel explores the relationship between Ezra Pound's poetry and the cultures and people—real, created, and re-created—that he uses to inhabit that poetry. From his early work, such as we find in A Lume Spento and Personae, and the culmination of his life's work in The Cantos, Pound shapes and shares many identities with the ultimate goal of pursuing truth and beauty. Panel papers might also explore Pound's use of numerous foreign languages in shaping and sharing these identities.

From the Margins to the Center: Reevaluating “Tradition” in English Studies

updated: 
Friday, September 20, 2019 - 4:34pm
University of Texas San Antonio Graduate English Organization
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 20, 2019

From the Margins to the Center: Reevaluating “Tradition” in English Studies

Graduate Student Symposium ft. keynote by Ariana Brown

February 22, 2020

University of Texas at San Antonio

 

“Enslaved Black folk couldn’t lift shackled feet,

so instead they shuffled

& invented the cumbia—

& you can’t tell me there aren’t many ways to survive,

to remember the dead,

to make a freedom where there isn’t one.”

Excerpt from Ariana Brown, “Cumbia,” published in the Acentos Review, 2019

Ubu: Grotesquery in Political Theory (ACLA Chicago)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:41am
Brendan McGillicuddy (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 22, 2019

Michel Foucault opened his 1974 seminars at the Collège de France - published as "Abnormal" - with a series of comments that link his theory of “governmentality” to the aesthetic category of the grotesque.

Marx in the American Grain

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:21am
Nineteenth-Century Prose
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Nineteenth-Century Proseis publishing a special edition in the spring of 2020 to be titled “Marx in the American Grain.” Submissions should engage Karl Marx and/or Marxist theory as it applies to the American project writ large. Essays from across the disciplines that focus on the long nineteenth century (1840-1920) in nonfiction prose and cultural studies (including history, politics, economics, history of ideas, etc.)  are welcome. Send 500 word abstracts and basic bio to dmadsion.furrh@csupueblo.edu

The deadline for submissions is November 1 2019.

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