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Writing as Resistance and Transgression: Gender, Poetics and Activism in Post-War Literature in English

updated: 
Wednesday, April 7, 2021 - 3:00pm
University of Wrocław
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 16, 2021

CFP : “Writing as Resistance and Transgression: Gender, Poetics and Activism in Post-War Literature in English”
Dates: May 27-28, 2021 (via Zoom)
Deadline for Submission: April 16, 2021
Keynote Speakers: Professor Agnieszka Graff (University of Warsaw) and Doctor
Elżbieta Klimek-Dominiak (University of Wrocław)
***
Writing as Resistance and Transgression: Gender, Poetics and Activism in Post-War Literature in English
Date: May 27-28, 2021

The Uses of Humor to Muddle through the COVID Pandemic

updated: 
Tuesday, April 6, 2021 - 5:00pm
Joseph A. Alvarez/ SAMLA (South Atlantic Modern Language Association)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 18, 2021

THE USES OF HUMOR TO MUDDLE THROUGH THE COVID PANDEMIC

AMERICAN HUMOR STUDIES ASSOCIATION

Literature and Popular Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, April 6, 2021 - 5:00pm
Northeast Popular & American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 1, 2021

The Literature and Popular Culture area for the 2021 Northeast Popular & American Culture Association conference is accepting paper and panel proposals from faculty and graduate students. NEPCA’s 2021 virtual annual conference will be held online from Thursday, October 21-Saturday, October 23, 2021. Abstracts are due by August 1, 2021.

The NEPCA Literature and Popular Culture area welcomes papers that analyze and evaluate the connections between popular culture and literature, understood broadly.  How does popular culture inform and/or react to literature, and what are the implications for that relationship? 

Las Vegas and the Absurd

updated: 
Tuesday, April 6, 2021 - 4:59pm
118th PAMLA Conference - Las Vegas, NV
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

Las Vegas is a town that has commodified the absurd and the spectacle. Crime bosses are glamorous, rules are just suggestions, bodies are for showcasing; essentially, fantasy is reality. This is the image of Las Vegas most often depicted in literature and film adaptations. The city of Las Vegas recently changed its official slogan from, “What happens in Vegas, Stays in Vegas” to, “What happens in Vegas, Only happens in Vegas.” This session is looking for investigations into the absurd as reality and spectacle as art or escape through literature about Las Vegas.

Northeastern Monsters (8/1/21; NEPCA virtual 10/21-23/21)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 6, 2021 - 4:54pm
Michael Torregrossa / Monsters & the Monstrous Area of the Northeast Popular/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 1, 2021

Northeastern Monsters

Session Proposed for the 2021 Conference of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association

Sponsored by the Monsters & the Monstrous Area

Virtual event, Thursday, 21 October, through Saturday, 23 October 2021.

Proposals due by 1 August 2021.

 

The Mouse’s Monsters: Monsters and the Monstrous in the Worlds of Disney (NEPCA virtual 10/21-23/21)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 6, 2021 - 4:54pm
Michael Torregrossa / Monsters & the Monstrous Area of the Northeast Popular/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 1, 2021

The Mouse’s Monsters: Monsters and the Monstrous in the Worlds of Disney

Joint Session Proposed for the 2021 Conference of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association

Sponsored by the Monsters & the Monstrous Area and the Disney Studies Area.

Virtual event, Thursday, 21 October, through Saturday, 23 October 2021.

Proposals due by 1 August 2021.

 

Global South: Incarceration and Resistance

updated: 
Tuesday, April 6, 2021 - 4:45pm
Juyoun Jang/ The University of Mississippi
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, June 1, 2021

Global South: Incarceration and Resistance

 

The Paranormative

updated: 
Tuesday, April 6, 2021 - 4:44pm
Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 30, 2021

One year later, a “return to normal” remains the pandemic’s most enduring political promise, a token of hope to hedge against continued death and precarity. Held within this recursive promise, however, is a prima facie condition that deserves interrogation. What, exactly, is the “normal” to which we will return? Will capitalism and its attendant crises no longer demand our attention absent a continual state of emergency? The coherence and stability of the “normal” eludes us; Georges Canguilhem sees the normal as itself a chimeric category, one which, from the perspective of medicine and science, is not so distant from the “pathological” it is meant to foil.

 

The Concept of Crisis in American Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, April 6, 2021 - 4:42pm
Maria-Sabina Draga Alexandru / University of Bucharest
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 14, 2021

The Center for American Studies at the University of Bucharest

and the Romanian-U.S. Fulbright Commission

invite proposals for their annual student conference on the topic

 

The Concept of Crisis in American Culture

 

to be held online

on Friday, May 21, 2021

 

 

 

Concise Collections: Teaching 18th Century Women

updated: 
Monday, March 29, 2021 - 12:14pm
ABO: Interdisciplinary Journal on Women in the Arts
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 2, 2021

ABO announces "Concise Collections on Teaching Eighteenth-Century Women," a new series that seeks to promote the teaching of eighteenth-century women writers and artists who remain seriously underrepresented in university classrooms, beyond a small collection of now-canonical authors.

In ABO’s Pedagogies section, we seek to publish groupings of three to five short articles focused on a specific female author/artist/grouping in each of the next six issues. The issue on Charlotte Lennox (Spring 2022) has now selected six proposals and is closed to further submisisons.

Humanities for the Greater Good

updated: 
Monday, March 29, 2021 - 8:56am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

This virtual (online) session welcomes papers on any aspect of the Humanities being used to increase quality of life, whether through public humanities, applied humanities, the arts, healthcare, social services, or other avenues; and, this year, papers that attempt to engage the conference theme of “City of God, City of Destruction” are particularly welcome.

SAMLA 2021- Racial Crossing in the 21st Century

updated: 
Monday, March 29, 2021 - 8:49am
Clark Barwick, Indiana University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 1, 2021

During the Jim Crow era, racial crossing in the United States was officially regulated through legal, economic, religious, and socio-cultural means. When African Americans and other people of color strategically chose to pass, they undermined, often at great risk to themselves, white hegemony and the fantasy of a definitively either-or color line. Following Brown vs. Board of Education and the Civil Rights accomplishments of the 1960s, racial crossing‚ including disguise and transformation, cross-racial interaction, relationships, and friendships‚ continued to be prevalent as it also manifested in new, productive, and sometimes strange forms. For example, Loving v.

Posthuman Drag (Edited Collection)

updated: 
Friday, March 26, 2021 - 4:40pm
Kai Prins (University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States) and Florian Zitzelsberger (University of Passau, Germany)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, April 5, 2021

Is drag separable from gender? A preponderance of self-described "drag things" (versus drag kings and queens) specializing in performances of non-human entities and appearing everywhere from stages in local gay bars to digital platforms like Instagram and YouTube would suggest so; however, when we speak of drag in academic literature, we hew closely to notions of drag as demonstrating gender performativity above all else. This collection therefore seeks to theorize a previously underrepresented form of drag performance that does not necessarily play with gender so much as it plays with humanness:We call this "posthuman drag."

Afro-Asian Solidarity in Motion (panel/online)_2021 PAMLA Annual Conference

updated: 
Friday, March 26, 2021 - 10:53am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

We invite proposals for this virtual (online) session exploring any aspect of Afro-Asian coalition-building projects in literary or cultural studies, with interest in engaging across cross-racial, interracial, or interminority studies bridging Black and Asian cultures and values. The tension and conflicts of interminority in the US, especially the Black-Asian conflicts, have been a big issue… but is it really the issue between the two communities only? Afro-Asian solidarity means a lot to both Black and Asian groups as their coalition, connection, allyship, and understanding have been undermined for decades, for many reasons, but here we gather to call out to say the Afro-Asian solidarity is revolutionary. Description After the Russo-Japanese War W. E.

Life Writing as Political Voice

updated: 
Friday, March 26, 2021 - 10:51am
PAMLA-Nov. 2021 Las vegas
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 22, 2021

City dwellers have a unique opportunity to see and engage in group political activities that those in more rural areas do not. Their everyday lives can be impacted by political demonstrations whether they are actively participating or not. The perspectives that we usually get are from the government, press, or political leaders. These accounts miss how people actually experience and understand the protests they see and/or participate in. As such, examining the life writing of those who participated or observed city protests can be intriguing and add a personal element to group politics. This panel will focus on the experiences of those who planned, participated, and/or observed protests in various cities. Ideas to be examined include personal vs.

CFP for the First Collection of Critical Essays on David Markson

updated: 
Friday, March 26, 2021 - 10:50am
Tiffany L. Fajardo and Tim Conley
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 1, 2021

Experimental fiction owes an unacknowledged debt to David Markson. A pioneer in the modernist tradition of James Joyce, William Faulkner, and Malcolm Lowry, Markson is generally grouped with renowned postmodernists such as John Barth and William Gaddis. Credited with the creation of his own genre, Markson’s later novels employ a highly idiosyncratic method of combining biographical and historical material to accrete a narrative that is often devoid of traditional characters or plot. While the early novels (which he deemed “Entertainments”) demonstrate a mastery of conventional forms including the Western and pulp noir, the innovations of his later novels have attracted a small but devoted following who have proselytized for a wider readership.

Deadline Approaching: The Plays of Anne Washburn

updated: 
Friday, March 26, 2021 - 10:45am
Comparative Drama Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, April 3, 2021

As Anne Washburn will be in attendance at the 44th Comparative Drama Conference, there will be a panel dedicated to her plays.

The conference does not require any specific focus, but some possible topics are:

Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play and other post-apocalyptic plays/works

Washburn’s interest in popular culture in her plays (for example, The Simpsons in Mr. Burns, her adaption of The Twilight Zone)

Washburn’s contribution to the growing number of plays about Trump or inspired by Trump (Shipwreck)

Washburn in dialogue with other playwrights

CFP for 2021 PAMLA - James Baldwin in Hawaiʻi, the Pacific, and Beyond: Teaching Intersectionality through Literature

updated: 
Friday, March 26, 2021 - 10:43am
Michael Pak, UH West Oahu
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

118th PAMLA Conference

Las Vegas, Nevada | November 11-14, 2021

Sahara Las Vegas Hotel and Online

Hosted by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 

PANEL

James Baldwin in Hawaiʻi, the Pacific, and Beyond: Teaching Intersectionality through Literature

 

MODERATOR

Mike Pak, UH West Oahu

pakm@hawaii.edu

 

ABSTRACT

Life Writing as Political Voice

updated: 
Wednesday, March 24, 2021 - 8:38pm
PAMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 22, 2021

City dwellers have a unique opportunity to see and engage in group political activities that those in more rural areas do not. Their everyday lives can be impacted by political demonstrations whether they are actively participating or not. The perspectives that we usually get are from the government, press, or political leaders. These accounts miss how people actually experience and understand the protests they see and/or participate in. As such, examining the life writing of those who participated or observed city protests can be intriguing and add a personal element to group politics. This panel will focus on the experiences of those who planned, participated, and/or observed protests in various cities. Ideas to be examined include personal vs.

Heller's Catch-22 CFP Proposal Deadline EXTENDED

updated: 
Monday, March 22, 2021 - 11:28am
Laura & James Nicosia
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 1, 2021

DEADLINE EXTENDED: April 1, 2021

 

Seeking submissions for a Critical Insights volume on Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 under contract with Salem/Grey House Publishers. Known as being a satirical, anti-war novel that initiated the eponymous phrase regarding paradoxical situations, Catch-22 was originally published in 1961. Catch-22 is appreciated for its dark humor, use of flashbacks, contorted chronology, countercultural sensibilities, and bizarre language. With current trends and political climate considered, it is time to revisit this classic text for a contemporary audience.

 

EXTENDED: Word Play: Nonstandard English and Multilingualism in Children’s and Young Adult Literature

updated: 
Sunday, March 21, 2021 - 4:45pm
Modern Language Association 2022
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 28, 2021

Children’s literature in English has long been a tool for literacy instruction and acculturation to English language, used both as a tool for learning and as a force for homogenization within histories of Anglophone colonialism and imperialism. As scholars and professors dedicated to exploring the ways in which texts for young people make meaning, we know that language functions as both a tool of empowerment and one of imprisonment. Amiri Baraka writes that “users”—or dominant cultures—“have words. And it is the users that establish the world’s realities.” Language, then, inevitably divides as it shapes such realities by sorting people into groups of “users” and non-users.

MLA 2022: Multilingual Williams by William Carlos Williams Society

updated: 
Friday, March 19, 2021 - 12:04pm
William Carlos Williams Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 24, 2021

Welcoming papers!  Discussions of multilingualism in the life and work of William Carlos Williams—including but not limited to his multilingual home and upbringing, his experiences living in Germany and France, his recognition of the need for knowledge of foreign languages, his readings of poetry and/or prose in translation, and his translations from Spanish, French, Greek, and Chinese. 500-word abstract to mlong@keene.edu, please, by 3/24/2021.

EPIDEMICS AND OTHERING: THE BIOPOLITICS OF COVID-19 IN HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES

updated: 
Friday, March 19, 2021 - 12:03pm
Jun.-Prof. Dr. Heike Steinhoff, Ruhr-University Bochum
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 30, 2021

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has impacted the globe for more than a year. This development sparked renewed interest in the historical, sociocultural, political, and economic aspects of epidemics and pandemics, currently evidenced by an outpouring of scholarship on the consequences of the current pandemic on the world’s population  as well as social and economic structures. This symposium provides a forum specifically for the study of the sociocultural developments that lead to “Othering” in situations of a perceived crisis.

Online symposium: In the Wake of Red Power Movements. New Perspectives on Indigenous Intellectual and Narrative Traditions (May 14/15, 2021)

updated: 
Friday, March 19, 2021 - 12:03pm
Institute of Advanced Study, University of Warwick
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, March 30, 2021

This symposium explores North American Indigenous intellectual and narrative traditions that were recovered, reclaimed, or (re-)invented in the wake of Red Power movements that emerged in the 1960s in the settler colonial societies of Canada and the USA. It asks: which new perspectives and visions have been developed over the last 50 years within Indigenous studies and related fields when looking at Indigenous land and land rights, Indigenous political and social sovereignty, extractivism and environmental destruction, oppressive sex/gender systems, and for describing the repercussions of settler colonialism in North America, especially in narrative representations?

Cthulus, Cults and Klansmen: The (Hi)stories within Lovecraft Country

updated: 
Friday, March 19, 2021 - 12:01pm
Centre for the History of the Gothic
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 9, 2021

 

An Online Symposium

Date: May 20  

Extended deadline for proposals: April 9 2021

This symposium is entirely FREE to present at and attend as it will be held online. Stay tuned keynote speaker names and presentation titles.

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