childrens literature

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CFP: PAMLA 2021-Young Adult Literature and Culture Panel

updated: 
Monday, April 12, 2021 - 8:20pm
Melanie A. Marotta, Morgan State University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

Call for Papers: Young Adult Literature and Culture Panel

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference

Thurday November 11 to Sunday November 14, 2021, at the Sahara Las Vegas Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada

Conference Theme: "City of God, City of Destruction" (https://pamla.ballastacademic.com/Home/CFP)

Panel Abstract:

The Mouse’s Monsters: Monsters and the Monstrous in the Worlds of Disney (NEPCA virtual 10/21-23/21)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 6, 2021 - 4:54pm
Michael Torregrossa / Monsters & the Monstrous Area of the Northeast Popular/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 1, 2021

The Mouse’s Monsters: Monsters and the Monstrous in the Worlds of Disney

Joint Session Proposed for the 2021 Conference of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association

Sponsored by the Monsters & the Monstrous Area and the Disney Studies Area.

Virtual event, Thursday, 21 October, through Saturday, 23 October 2021.

Proposals due by 1 August 2021.

 

Storytelling to and about Boys: Meanings and Representations in Children’s Media

updated: 
Tuesday, April 6, 2021 - 4:44pm
Boyhood Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 16, 2021

In recent decades, research has repeatedly demonstrated the overrepresentation of boys and men in children’s media (tv and movies, literature, and games). This field of research has, justifiably, focused primarily on the impact of this inequality on girls and women and has grown to consider not only the quantity of representations but also their content.

"Nevertheless, she persisted": Girls, Literature for Girls, and the Politics of Persistence

updated: 
Tuesday, April 6, 2021 - 4:43pm
Special Issue of Women's Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, June 1, 2021

CFP: "Nevertheless, she persisted": Girls, Literature for Girls, and the Politics of Persistence

Special issue of Women’s Studies

 

In 2017, Mitch McConnell explained his silencing of Senator Elizabeth Warren by stating, "She had appeared to violate the rule. She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted."

Creative Children and Children's Culture

updated: 
Monday, March 29, 2021 - 8:49am
Peter Kunze and Victoria Ford Smith
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, May 1, 2021

We are putting together an edited collection on cultural productions by children, theorizing children as creators and exploring children’s cultural production as a crucial, albeit often understudied, area of children’s literature, media, and cultural studies. We have most of the contributors in place, but we are seeking 2 to 3 additional chapters to round out the collection--specifically chapters on performance, music, visual art, digital media, film, television, and/or handicrafts from any time period, with special attention to BIPOC children. Please note that we are seeking work on children, not teenagers.

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference CFP: Children's Literature (Nov. 11-14 2021)

updated: 
Friday, March 26, 2021 - 10:43am
Craig Svonkin, Metropolitan State University of Denver
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

PAMLA 2021 LAS VEGAS: "CITY OF GOD, CITY OF DESTRUCTION" (Thursday, November 11 - Sunday, November 14, 2021 at Sahara Las Vegas Hotel, hosted by University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

Session: British Literature and Culture: To 1700

Contacts: Craig Svonkin, Metropolitan State University of Denver (director@pamla.org)

EXTENDED: Word Play: Nonstandard English and Multilingualism in Children’s and Young Adult Literature

updated: 
Sunday, March 21, 2021 - 4:45pm
Modern Language Association 2022
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 28, 2021

Children’s literature in English has long been a tool for literacy instruction and acculturation to English language, used both as a tool for learning and as a force for homogenization within histories of Anglophone colonialism and imperialism. As scholars and professors dedicated to exploring the ways in which texts for young people make meaning, we know that language functions as both a tool of empowerment and one of imprisonment. Amiri Baraka writes that “users”—or dominant cultures—“have words. And it is the users that establish the world’s realities.” Language, then, inevitably divides as it shapes such realities by sorting people into groups of “users” and non-users.

The International Journal of Childhood and Women’s Studies (IJCWS)

updated: 
Friday, March 12, 2021 - 10:04am
Faculty of Women for Arts, Science & Education, Ain Shams University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

Call for Submissions

 

The Faculty of Women for Arts, Science and Education is pleased to announce the launch of its newest peer-reviewed academic journal, an international Journal of Childhood and Women's Studies (IJCWS), open for submission for the first issue, April 2021!  IJCWS is published quarterly (January, April, July and October), beginning in April 2021. Its official languages are Arabic, English, and French.

The journal now welcomes submissions via the on-line portal (http://ijcws.journals.ekb)

Conference series | 50+ Shades of Gothic: The Gothic Across Genre and Media in US Popular Culture

updated: 
Thursday, March 11, 2021 - 8:57am
PopMeC research collective and academic blog
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, April 4, 2021

EXTENDED DEADLINES | CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS

Confirmed keynote scholars: Enrique Ajuria Ibarra, Xavier Aldana Reyes, Kyle Bishop, Kevin Corstorphine, Justin Edwards (closing), Anya Heise-von der Lippe, Michael Howarth, Evert J. van Leeuwen, Elizabeth Parker + Michelle Poland, David Punter (closing), Julia Round, Christy Tidwell, Jeffrey Weinstock (opening), Maisha L. Wester. 

Fairies: A Companion

updated: 
Thursday, March 4, 2021 - 4:27pm
Simon Bacon and Lorna Piatti-Farnell
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

Stories about fairies and the fae have long populated the imagination of many cultures around the world. Fairy histories have been the focus of much scholarly debate, and so has the figure of the fairy as a cultural icon.

Fairies and the fae have also gained a noticeable importance in the 21st century, bringing with them an increased cultural focus on traditional beliefs and indigenous identities. Indeed, while the connection to the folkloristic and the literary remains strong—with the multiple re-incarnations Tinkerbell from Peter Pan taking centerstage here—fairies have also found renewed life in modern and contemporary re-imaginings.

Eurasian Folk and Fairy Tales: Bridging Continents

updated: 
Monday, March 1, 2021 - 11:29am
European Languages and Cultures Research Centre, Ege University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, May 31, 2021

Emerging from oral literature, folk and fairy tales are embedded and entangled within the very confines of human consciousness and are continuously rewoven into the fabric of cultural memory. Often categorised as stories for children, these tales not only provide vital information into the psyche and disposition of the human mind, but also enable us to understand social and cultural interactions. The vast imagery, motifs, and archetypes these tales produce enable them to be constantly re-conceived, reinterpreted, and disseminated. Even though folk and fairy tales emerge from differing cultures with diverse traditions and customs, they seem to share similar formation mechanisms.

BLACK GIRL BANNED: REBELLION AND RADICAL BLACK GIRLHOOD [Edited collection]

updated: 
Wednesday, February 24, 2021 - 4:38pm
Ebony Perro & Regina Bernard-Carreno
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, March 30, 2021

From Alice Walker’s womanism to bell hooks’ oppositional gaze, Black girls’ rebellion inspires concepts and theoretical approaches that aid in understanding the lives of girls and women.  These theorizations—and Black girls’ actions—counter dominant narratives and distortions of Black girlhood. Despite censoring, surveilling, and policing, Black girls find creative ways to assert and insert  themselves in spaces where their behavior may be considered “deviant,” “rebellious,” or “womanish. ”They often engage in what Aimee Meredith Cox calls shapeshifting to “ confront, challenge, invert, unsettle, and expose the material impact of systemic oppression”(7).

A Small Boy and Others: Henry James and the Child

updated: 
Sunday, February 21, 2021 - 7:32pm
Henry James Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 15, 2021

Children appear in James’s fiction in many different kinds of roles, from the annoying little brother in Daisy Miller to the impressionable girl of What Maisie Knew. He also wrote extensively about his own childhood and those of his siblings. None of these writings are, however, for child readers, unlike the work of Lewis Carroll or Robert Louis Stevenson or Mark Twain or Louisa May Alcott. What opportunities does James find in his representations of children? How does the development of his late style affect these possibilities? These topics are suggestions, but other approaches to the subject are invited.

 

Players and Pawns: Political Childhoods, Political Children

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2021 - 2:13pm
M. Green-Barteet Children's Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 5, 2021

Special Session, MLA (Modern Language Association) 2022

Location/Dates: Washington DC, 6-9th January, 2022

Deadline for submissions: March 5, 2021

Organization: Children's Literature Division, MLA

Contact email: mgreenb6@uwo.ca

Counternarratives: Weaving Graphic Narratives in the Local, National, and the Global

updated: 
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 11:45am
Sayanti Mondal, MLA, 2022
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 7, 2021

Counternarratives: Weaving Graphic Narratives in the Local, National, and the Global

Special Session, MLA, 2022.
Washington DC, 6-9th Jan, 2022.

 

“Art can be a powerful means of challenging the stereotypes of mutually antagonizing nations”—Aphrodite Desiree Navab

Fairy Tales at the 2021 PCA conference (online, June 2-5, 2021)--DEADLINE EXTENDED

updated: 
Wednesday, January 20, 2021 - 1:59pm
Popular Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, February 28, 2021

The Fairy Tales Area of the Popular Culture Association (PCA) seeks paper presentations and panels for the annual conference, to be held online from June 2-5, 2021. We are looking for projects that think broadly and diversely about fairy tales throughout the world. This year, we particularly seek papers focused on pedagogical uses of fairy tales at all levels and in all fields, discussions of folkloric shifts from oral to literary to visual (filmic, artistic, etc.) versions of tales, and creative pieces that retell or critique fairy tales or use the tales to comment on some aspect of culture or history.

PAMLA 2021 Panel: Disney and Its Worlds

updated: 
Tuesday, January 19, 2021 - 10:19am
PAMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 15, 2021

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference

Thurday November 11 to Sunday November 14, 2021, at the Sahara Las Vegas Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada

Confronting the Real in Fairy Tales: Humanities (Special Issue: Deadline Extended)

updated: 
Thursday, January 7, 2021 - 3:02pm
Professor Susan Redington Bobby/Wesley College
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, June 1, 2021

Prof. Susan Redington Bobby 
Website1 Website2 
Guest Editor Department of Literature and Languages, Wesley College, Dover, DE, 19901, USA
Interests: fairy tale studies; adolescent literature; magical realism; goddess archetypesSpecial Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Drum Dream Girls and Northern Lights Kids: New Models of Constructing Childhood for Diverse Children” - ChLA Guaranteed Session for MLA 2022

updated: 
Thursday, January 7, 2021 - 10:41am
Children's Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 1, 2021

In their chilling study “Listening to Black Women and Girls: Lived Experiences of Adultification Bias,” Jamilia J. Blake and Rebecca Epstein conclude “that adults perceive Black girls as less innocent than white girls as young as 5-9 years old.” While Blake and Epstein centralize Black girlhood, this adultification bias similarly affects Black boys and other children of color. Children of color’s perception as ‘more adult’ than their white peers does not imbue them with any agency or power, rather, it divests them of childhood, at least within childhood’s contemporary definitions. Yet, these contemporary definitions of childhood are grounded in whiteness and white privilege.

Virtual Session Monsters in/of Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Culture (2/28/2021; PCA 6/2-5/2021)

updated: 
Wednesday, January 6, 2021 - 4:31pm
Michael Torregrossa / Monsters & the Monstrous Area of the Northeast Popular/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, February 28, 2021

Monsters in/of Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Culture (virtual session)

Sponsored by the Monsters & the Monstrous Area of the Northeast Popular/American Culture Association for the Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Culture Area of the Popular Culture Association

Session planned for the 2021 National Conference of the Popular Culture Association, virtual event, 2-5 June 2021

 

CALL FOR PAPER FOR VOL. 2, NO.1, JAN-FEB, 2021

updated: 
Wednesday, January 6, 2021 - 4:31pm
New Literaria Journal- An International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, January 30, 2021

CFP

New Literaria Journal- An International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities

(Vol. 2, No. 1, Jan- February, 2021)

We are having papers for our January- February Issue on broad areas:

Dragons in Children’s Literature and Graphic Novels

updated: 
Wednesday, January 6, 2021 - 4:28pm
St. Thomas University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 10, 2021

Working Title of the Volume: Wings, Wonders, and Warriors: Dragons in Children’s Literature and Graphic Novels

As the popularity of mythical creatures in films and literature grows, there is one creature that remains prominent: the dragon. Dragons have become most visible recently in the cinematic versions of The Hobbit and in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire (Game of Thrones Series). However, there are other films, such as Dragonslayer (1981), Reign of Fire (2002), Dragonheart (1996), and the How to Train Your Dragon series (2010-2019), and numerous adult and children’s literature series that feature dragons.

Teaching Children's Literature to Undergraduates

updated: 
Friday, December 18, 2020 - 11:36am
Stephanie J Weaver and Philip Smith, Savannah College of Art and Design
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 31, 2021

 Children's Literature has been taught in undergraduate classrooms since at least the early 1970s and has grown to become a staple of English literature programs. Children's literature classes are typically among the most popular English lit course offerings and often draw in students from other disciplines. It is easy to understand why; children's literature classes promise students the opportunity to revisit familiar works with fresh eyes. With the rise of children's book purchases in the midst of the pandemic, the popularity of the discipline is unlikely to abate.

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