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childrens literature

For My People: Dismantling the Child/Adult Dichotomy in Black Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, November 5, 2019 - 4:13pm
Ellen Donovan & Laura Dubek / College Literature Special Issue
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 30, 2020

In 2018 Duke University Press reissued James Baldwin’s Little Man, Little Man: A Record of Childhood. In “A James Baldwin Book, Forgotten and Overlooked for Four Decades, Gets Another Life,” New York Times writer Alexandra Alter notes that in 1976 Little Man received lukewarm reviews: “critics didn’t know what to make of an experimental, enigmatic picture book that straddled the line between children’s and adult literature.” Alter posits that because of a changed social and political climate, Baldwin’s book will now have an easier time finding an audience.

Folklore, Learning and Literacies

updated: 
Tuesday, November 5, 2019 - 4:12pm
Folklore Society
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 12, 2020

Folklore, Learning and Literacies

The Annual Conference of the Folklore Society

 

Friday 24 to Sunday 26 April 2020, London

Lore is learning: folklore is a body of knowledge and a means of transmission. Vernacular knowledge, and vernacular transmission, each rooted in language.

 

Horrifying Children: television, literature and popular culture from 1966-1998

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 7:03am
Robert Edgar and John Marland: York Centre for Writing, York St John University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 2, 2020

Twitter: @horrifyingbook

Email: HorrifyingChildrenBook@outlook.com

There has been an explosion of interest in the impact of children’s television and literature of the late C20th. In particular, the 1970s and 1980s are seen as decades that shaped a great deal of our contemporary cultural landscape. Television of this period dominated the world of childhood entertainment, drawing freely upon literature and popular culture, and much of it continues to resonate powerfully with the generation of cultural producers (fiction writers, screenwriters, directors, musicians and artists) that grew up watching the weird, the eerie and the horrific.

Midwestern Childhoods

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 6:50am
Maggie Morris Davis
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Sherwood Anderson’s 1928 Tar: A Midwest Childhood opens with the title character remembering his childhood and acknowledging that he has, within this narrative, created his childhood midwestern hometown almost entirely from his imagination, “one place all his own, the product of his own fancy” (4). “To tell the truth, Tar was trying,” the narrator promises, “to get at something it was almost impossible to get at in the reality of life,” the inevitable changes that disrupt and discount the intertwined memories of childhood and place (7-8).

Deadline EXTENDED: Call for Papers: SWPACA Children's/YA Culture Area

updated: 
Wednesday, October 30, 2019 - 3:58pm
Southwest Popular/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Call for Papers– DEADLINE EXTENDED!

Children’s/YA Culture

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA)

 

41st Annual Conference, February 19-22, 2020

Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center

Albuquerque, New Mexico

http://www.southwestpca.org

Extended Proposal submission deadline: November 20, 2019

Call for Book Chapters on Mythological Equines in Children’s Literature

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 6:41am
Northwestern State University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 5, 2019

Call for Book Chapters on Mythological Equines in Children’s Literature

Vernon Press invites chapter proposals on the theme: Mythological Equines in Children’s Literature for an edited collection of the same name in the series Equine Creations: Imagining Horses in Literature and Film, edited by Rachel L. Carazo (Northwestern State University).

Woman Questions: Margaret Fuller and Louisa May Alcott in Their Time

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 6:36am
Anne K. Phillips / Louisa May Alcott Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 27, 2019

In this year of the centennial of women’s suffrage in the US, the Fuller and Alcott Societies invite your participation in the Thoreau Gathering (July 8-12, 2020 in Concord, MA).  Our focus will be on gender as part of the Gathering’s larger theme of “Thoreau and Diversity: People, Principles, Politics.”  What did Thoreau’s two most famous female contemporaries in the Concord circle have to say to him, to each other, or to their larger worlds about changing the legal and human status of women? 

Dragons: Edited collections on film, literature, gaming, and online culture

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 6:35am
Northwestern State University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 1, 2019

As the popularity of mythical creatures in films and literature grows, there is one creature that remains prominent: the dragon. Dragons have become most visible recently in the cinematic versions of The Hobbit and in George R.R. Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire (Game of Thrones Series). However, there are other films, such as Dragonslayer (1981), Reign of Fire (2002), Dragonheart (1996), and the How to Train Your Dragon series (2010-2019), and numerous adult and children’s literature series that feature dragons.

Call for book chapters on Marguerite Henry's King of the Wind

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 6:35am
Northwestern State University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 29, 2019

I invite chapter proposals on Marguerite Henry’s Newbery-winning novel King of the Wind for the first in a series of edited collections about Henry’s individual works, edited by Rachel L. Carazo (Northwestern State University).

All areas of study, with a common goal of representing the cultural, social, philosophical, and material significance of King of the Wind are invited to participate.

While writing my graduate thesis, “Conflicting Views of Culture and Power: The Arab World in Marguerite Henry’s King of the Wind”, Dawn Heinecken also published an article about the absence of scholarship on Henry’s works. These proposed collections therefore seek to increase the scholarship available about Marguerite Henry.

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