childrens literature

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CFP: Why Arthur? (round table) (9/1/09; Kalamazoo 5/13-16/10)

updated: 
Sunday, June 28, 2009 - 2:33am
Michael A. Torregrossa/The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages

CALL FOR PAPERS

ROUND TABLE on
WHY ARTHUR?
REFLECTIONS ON THE INTERNATIONAL APPEAL OF THE
MATTER OF BRITAIN IN THE POST-MEDIEVAL WORLD

45TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES
WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
KALAMAZOO, MI
13-16 MAY 2010

PROPOSALS BY 1 SEPTEMBER 2009

Co-Sponsored by
THE ALLIANCE FOR THE PROMOTION OF RESEARCH ON THE VILLAINS OF THE MATTER OF BRITAIN and THE SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF POPULAR CULTURE AND THE MIDDLE AGES

[UPDATE] Comics & Popular Arts Conference (due: July 1 2009)

updated: 
Friday, June 26, 2009 - 10:39am
Matthew J. Brown

REMINDER: Deadline is approaching soon---July 1.

Call for Participation

Institute for Comics Studies
Comic Book Convention Conference Series

DRAGON*CON 2nd ANNUAL COMICS & POPULAR ARTS CONFERENCE

Atlanta, Georgia September 4-7, 2009

The Institute for Comic Studies and Dragon*Con present their second annual academic conference for the studies of comics and the popular arts to take place at Dragon*Con, the largest multi-media, popular culture convention focusing on science fiction and fantasy, gaming, comics, literature, art, music, and film in the US. For more info on Dragon*Con, visit http://dragoncon.org/

[UPDATE] Motion Comics [SCMS Panel] 7/31/09; 3/17/10-3/21/10; Los Angeles

updated: 
Thursday, June 25, 2009 - 10:31pm
Dr. Douglas A. Cunningham

Motion comics are (in most cases) digitized, panel-by-panel, animated translations of comic books or graphic novels. This new medium has gained high visibility most recently as a result of Warner Bros.' adaption of D.C.'s WATCHMEN into the motion comics format as part of the studio's overall efforts to promote the live-action film version of the famed graphic novel. Several additional comics have, however, been adapted into this format, including BATMAN: BLACK AND WHITE, STEPHEN KING'S "N.", I AM LEGEND, SPIDER WOMAN, and ASTONISHING X-MEN, among many others.

[UPDATE] Extended deadline - JUNE 30 Steampunk! Revisions of Time and Technology. SAMLA 11/6-11/9 2009

updated: 
Thursday, June 25, 2009 - 9:25am
Kathryn Crowther / SAMLA

I am looking for one more paper to complete this SAMLA special session panel. I welcome papers on any aspect of the Steampunk genre. Papers could address literature, film, art, or other cultural manifestations of Steampunk. Of particular interest are discussions of the ways that Steampunk engages with notions of time and historical discourse, the materiality of Steampunk, and the intersections of technology and literature. By June 1, please send a one-page abstract that includes audio/visual needs and a short vita (with complete contact information) to Kathryn Crowther, Georgia Institute of Technology at kathryn.crowther@lcc.gatech.edu

The Past's Digital Presence: Database, Archive, and Knowledge Work in the Humanities (A Graduate Student Symposium)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 24, 2009 - 4:25pm
Yale University Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, the Whitney Humanities Center

How is digital technology changing methods of scholarly research with pre-digital sources in the humanities? If the "medium is the message," then how does the message change when primary sources are translated into digital media? What kinds of new research opportunities do databases unlock and what do they make obsolete? What is the future of the rare book and manuscript library and its use? What biases are inherent in the widespread use of digitized material? How can we correct for them? Amidst numerous benefits in accessibility, cost, and convenience, what concerns have been overlooked?

Illuminating the Everyday Imagination [NEMLA, April 7-11, 2010; abstracts by 9/30/09]

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2009 - 9:20pm
Elaine Auyoung

This panel considers the imagination's literary significance in relation to its underestimated role in everyday cognitive life. Papers may combine analysis of specific texts with psychological, philosophical, or cognitive accounts of the imagination. How does literary representation reflect the everyday imagination at work? How do fictional characters and narrators model commonplace imaginative acts? Most important, how does literature engage our ordinary imaginative powers in such extraordinary ways? Send 300 to 500-word abstracts to Elaine Auyoung at auyoung@fas.harvard.edu.

[update] William Blake and His Influence 4/7-11 2009, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; proposals by Sept. 30, 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2009 - 6:29pm
Josephine McQuail / Northeast Modern Language Association Convention

Papers are welcome on William Blake and his influence on any one of the many artists or movements he impacted, including not only literature but visual arts and music: including but not limited to the Pre-Raphaelites, the Ancients, W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, Ginsberg and the Beats, Van Morrison, Billy Bragg, Patti Smith, composer William Bolcom, -- not to mention popular writers like Joyce Carol Oates, Thomas Harris, etc. What do the artists "half create/And what perceive" in their own vision of William Blake? What is Blake's legacy today? E-mail abstracts or complete papers (limited to 10-12 minutes presentation time) to Josephine McQuail or mail to Dr. J. McQuail, Box 5053, 5 William L.

Proposed Essay Collection – From King of the Jungle to Cultural Icon: Tarzan at 100

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2009 - 12:49pm
Edited by Michelle Ann Abate and Annette Wannamaker

From King of the Jungle to Cultural Icon will be an interdisciplinary essay collection marking the 100th anniversary of Tarzan of the Apes. Since its debut in serial format in 1912, Edgar Rice Burroughs' narrative about an orphaned white boy being raised by a band of black apes in the African jungle has become a transnational literary classic, frequent cinematic, film and comic book icon and powerful—as well as problematic—cultural archetype. This collection will allow critics from a wide range of disciples to explore the past place, present status and future importance of Tarzan in popular print, visual and material culture.

TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY MEDIEVALISMS (12/31/09; Plymouth State Medieval and Renaissance Forum 4/16-17/10)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2009 - 12:50am
The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages

TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY MEDIEVALISMS:
CONTEMPORARY RE-CREATIONS OF THE MEDIEVAL

CALL FOR PAPERS
PROPOSALS DUE BY 12/31/09

Sponsored by THE SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF POPULAR CULTURE AND THE MIDDLE AGES
For "Time, Temporality, History": 31st Annual Medieval and Renaissance Forum, Plymouth State University (Plymouth, NH), 16-17 April 2010

CFP Colporteurs' Conference 2009 "Spaces, Places, Landscapes", 23 September 2009. Abstracts deadline: 31 July 2009

updated: 
Saturday, June 20, 2009 - 8:39am
Irina Marchesini, Luca Pasquale, Luca Vancini - University of Bologna, Italy.

The group Colporteurs is pleased to announce their annual conference, which will be held on Wednesday, 23rd September 2009 at the Department of Italian Studies at Bologna University (via Zamboni, 32 – Bologna, Italy).
The chosen subject has been inspired by the theme (Declensions of Space) of this year PhD seminar in "Modern, Comparative and Postcolonial Literatures".

[Update] Spatialities: Dynamic Places and Spaces. ABSTRACTS DUE JULY !

updated: 
Thursday, June 18, 2009 - 2:32pm
Rice University

Rice Graduate Symposium
October 2-3, 2009
Rice University, Houston, TX

Call For Papers
Submission Deadline: July 1, 2009

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Sharon Marcus; Professor of Literature, Columbia University

As the citizen of the nation becomes the consumer of the multinational corporation, our roles as inhabitants of space become increasingly complicated. Our literature, our faith, our bodies all speak to the different ways that we find to occupy the shifting territories of the postmodern landscape. Looking both to the past and future can help us to discover the real and imagined ways our cultures can develop in more richly and defined ways.

Call for Book Reviews

updated: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2009 - 8:40am
MP: an Online Feminist Journal

MP Journal, an online international feminist journal (http://www.academinist.org/mp/) is currently seeking book reviews for future issues. We welcome reviews of books that are relevant to feminist or womanist issues from a variety of disciplines. Reviews must be academic in nature and provide an examination of the books' strengths and weaknesses, raising important and relevant questions about the subject under discussion. While no author likes to be overly criticized, reviewers should offer an honest appraisal of the books' argument, readability, research, and overall approach using professional language that is rich and robust without an overabundance of jargon.

MISSED CONNECTIONS Penn Humanities Forum Graduate Conference 2/19/10

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2009 - 11:17pm
Graduate Humanities Forum, University of Pennsylvania

MISSED CONNECTIONS

The Graduate Humanities Forum of the University of Pennsylvania invites submissions for its 10th annual conference: "Missed Connections." The one-day interdisciplinary conference will take place on Friday, February 19th, 2010 at the Penn Humanities Forum in conjunction with its 2009-2010 topic: "Connections."

Unlikely Bedfellows: Unexpected Collaborations Within the Information Environment ALISE Conference 2010 – January 12-15, 2010; B

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2009 - 12:58pm
Cindy Welch/ALISE - Historical Perspectives Special Interest Group

CFP: Unlikely Bedfellows: Unexpected Collaborations Within the Information Environment
ALISE Conference 2010 – January 12-15, 2010; Boston, MA

From the American Library Association's alignment with "Hustler" publisher Larry Flynt, to YALSA reading programs with the World Wrestling Federation, information workers have historically enjoyed – or, perhaps, tolerated – improbable partnerships and alliances. The Historical Perspectives SIG invites papers on this topic, for a panel at ALISE 2010. Papers should explore the unusual collaborations information workers in all venues or environments have built or been part of in order to accomplish their goals.

[UPDATE] Fairy Tale Economies

updated: 
Tuesday, June 16, 2009 - 9:06am
Dr. Molly Clark Hillard: University of Southern Mississippi and Group for International Fairy Tale Studies

Fairy Tale Economies

An interdisciplinary, international conference
October 1—3, 2009
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg MS

Mindful of our own global economies, this colloquium addresses economies in fantastic literature and culture. We shall identify economy both as a theme within literatures and as a way of thinking about the value of fantastic literature itself.

GEMCS [UPDATE] deadline 7/14 for conference 10/22/09-10/25/09

updated: 
Saturday, June 13, 2009 - 1:57pm
Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies

Deadline extended to July 14.

Call for Papers
Early Modern Culture, 1450-1850

The Sixteenth Annual Meeting of the Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies (GEMCS)

"Tracing Footprints"

October 22-25, 2009
Dallas, Texas

GEMCS was formed in 1993 to promote the study of literature, history, art history, and material culture from the Renaissance to the mid-nineteenth century across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries.

This year's theme, "Tracing Footprints," is intended to be suggestive rather than prescriptive. As always, GEMCS welcomes panels and proposals on all aspects of culture between 1450 and 1850.

Exploring Childhood Studies

updated: 
Friday, June 12, 2009 - 9:26pm
Rutgers University-Camden/Graduate Students of Department of Childhood Studies

Department of Childhood Studies
Rutgers University, Camden

Call for Papers – Exploring Childhood Studies

The graduate students of the Department of Childhood Studies at Rutgers University, Camden invite submissions for papers and poster presentations for their first formal graduate student conference on April 9, 2010. Graduate students from all disciplines who are engaged in research relating to children and childhood are encouraged to submit proposals.

[UPDATE] Science Fiction in Children's Film and Television (Deadline Extended to 7/15/09)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 10, 2009 - 12:09am
R.C. Neighbors and Sandy Rankin/University of Arkansas

(Proposal deadline has been extended to July 15th.)

It has often been said that science fiction is a literature of ideas. Through the use of familiar tropes, such as spaceships, aliens, and ray guns, the genre uses the future (and sometimes the past) to comment on the present--on current social, cultural, and political ideologies. Likewise, media directed at children often focus on advocating or criticizing similar ideologies, sometimes for a didactic purpose. It is interesting, then, that so little has been said about the joining of these two genres--children's science fiction--particularly when dealing with the visual media of film and television.

Recycling Myths, Inventing Nations 14-16 July 2010

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2009 - 5:26am
Aberystwyth University

http://www.aber.ac.uk/myth2010/

The organisers of Recycling Myths, Inventing Nations would like to invite proposals for panels and papers that explore myth and myth-making in all its guises. The conference will bring together scholars working across creative and critical disciplines, historical periods and theoretical approaches in order to explore the links be-tween story-telling, mythology, histories, identities and ideologies.

Key note speakers include Professor Murray Pittock (University of Glasgow) who will be speaking on the theme "What is a National Culture".

James Bond and Popular Culture-Call for Essays-Book project -The Films are NOT Enough

updated: 
Monday, June 8, 2009 - 4:09pm
Rob Weiner/jack Becker texas Tech University

Call for SPECIFIC Papers-James Bond and Popular Culture: the Films are Not Enough!
The editors of a forthcoming volume are seeking a few specific articles to supplement a book in progress about James Bond and Popular Culture. The following topics will be given first consideration for inclusion in the forthcoming book. Other topics will be considered.
James Bond and Linguistics: How have the James Bond movies and novels affected our speech and semeiotic communication?
Gender in the James Bond Comics
The music of Bond: the success or lack of success of Bond theme-songs. Did the scoring impact the popularity of the film; or did the popularity of the musical score impact the movie?
John Barry as a composer of Bond Music!

Press/Reject!

updated: 
Sunday, June 7, 2009 - 9:01am
Richard Burt and Craig Saper

Call for Essays for "Press (R)eject" special issue of Rhizomes.net
issue 20 (Winter 2009/2010) http://www.rhizomes.net/

Co-edited Richard Burt and Craig Saper, co-operators of the
Rejectionist Movement

CFP: Importance of Studying Oscar [Wilde]: Plays, Stories, Letters, and Lectures

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2009 - 11:14pm
Annette M. Magid / Northeast Modern Language Association

I am seeking paper proposals for my 2010 panel for NeMLA in Montreal is "The Importance of Studying Oscar [Wilde]: Plays, Stories, Letters."

This panel offers an opportunity to analyze the role Oscar Wilde has played and continues to play in literature, theater and other aspects of culture. Focus can be on his influential wit and wisdom and/or techniques used to present Oscar in the classroom. This topic calls for a diversity of approaches. Please send 200-400 word abstracts to Annette Magid at a_magid@yahoo.com.

Deadline for submission of paper proposal is September 10, 2009.

Contemporary Women's Writing: New Texts, Approaches, and Technologies (7-9 July 2010; deadline 15 August 2009)

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2009 - 3:54pm
Contemporary Women's Writing Network and San Diego State University

The Third Biennial International Conference of the
Contemporary Women's Writing Network

In Collaboration with San Diego State University

7-9 July 2010

Abstract Deadline: 15 August 2009

Organizers:

Edith Frampton, Dept. of English and Comparative Literature

Anne Donadey, Departments of European Studies and Women's Studies

Due 9/1/09 OUr Monsters, Ourselves NEMLA 2010 Montreal, Quebec

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2009 - 11:48am
Lizzie Harris McCormick / NEMLA

"Our Monsters, Ourselves"

This panel seeks papers on the historical significance and meaning of the monsters everywhere in our cultural moment. Following the line of thought that a society's supernatural monsters in many ways define them, "Our Monsters, Ourselves" hopes to open the discussion of the ways monsters in recent fiction and film represent the tacit panics, problems and pleasures of English-language, North American culture in 2010. Monsters are defined, for this panel, as those creatures presented as explicitly and literally "supernatural" or "artificial" by their authors.

A short list of dramatis personae might include vampires, ware-wolves, robots, ghosts, AI figures, witches and demons.

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