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Pockets of Change: Cultural Adaptations and Transitions

updated: 
Thursday, May 7, 2009 - 10:18pm
University of Queensland Work in Progress conference

Pockets of Change: Cultural Adaptations and Transitions

13th Annual Work-in-Progress Conference
School of English, Media Studies and Art History
University of Queensland, St. Lucia Campus
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
September 4-6, 2009

Keynote: Professor Toby Miller, University of California, Riverside

"CULTURE AND CRISIS" A call for Papers for a Special Issue of CULTURAL LOGIC

updated: 
Thursday, May 7, 2009 - 12:47pm
Joseph G. Ramsey, Ph.D. co-editor CULTURAL LOGIC

"Culture and Crisis"
A Call for Papers for
A Special Issue of CULTURAL LOGIC

Edited by Joseph G. Ramsey, appearing Winter 2009/2010

******
Talk of crisis is everywhere. Financial. Environmental. Geopolitical. Cultural. A Crisis of Crises...

EAPSU Conference, October 22-24, 2009. Proposals due July 1, 2009.

updated: 
Wednesday, May 6, 2009 - 11:33am
English Association of Pennsylvania State Universities

The 2009 EAPSU (English Association of Pennsylvania State Universities) Conference will be held at Shippensburg University, October 22-24, 2009. The conference theme is "Making Our World: Language, Literacy and Culture."

We invite proposals from faculty and students for presentations, roundtable discussions, and workshops that address how the work of English studies continues to make and remake our communities, our classrooms, and the world around us. Topics include, but are not limited to: Literatures, Popular Culture & Film, Composition and Pedagogy, and Creative Texts: Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, and Poetry.

Wizard World University-Chicago and Philidephia (Comic Book Convention Conference Series )

updated: 
Monday, May 4, 2009 - 11:37am
Institute for Comics Studies

The Institute for Comics Studies is soliciting proposals for presentations, book talks, slide talks, roundtables, professional focus discussion panels, workshops and other panels centered around comics or comics related areas of study for Wizard World University—Philadelphia and Wizard World University—Chicago, the academic tracks of Wizard World Comic Book Conventions.

Panels that include participation by comics industry professionals are especially encouraged. ICS will provide assistance with recruiting professionals for participation in WWU panels.

Irish Studies at MPCA/ACA

updated: 
Monday, May 4, 2009 - 10:57am
Midwest Popular Culture Association/ American Culture Association

The Irish Studies area of the Midwest Popular Culture and Midwest American Culture Association is extending its deadline for its upcoming conference. The MPCA/MACA conference will be held Friday-Sunday, October 30-November 1, 2009 at the Book Cadillac Westin in Detroit, Michigan.

Please send proposals on any aspect of Irish Studies to the area chair via email or mail. Emailed proposals should be sent to Kathleen Turner, Department of English, Northern Illinois University at turner8kathleen@gmail.com. Mailed proposals should be sent to Kathleen Turner, Department of English, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115.

Harry Potter MPCA/ACA Oct 30-Nov 1

updated: 
Monday, May 4, 2009 - 10:55am
Midwest Popular Culture Association/ American Culture Association

The Harry Potter area of the Midwest Popular Culture and Midwest American Culture Association is extending its deadline for its upcoming conference. The MPCA/MACA conference will be held Friday-Sunday, October 30-November 1, 2009 at the Book Cadillac Westin in Detroit Michigan.

Please send proposals on any aspect of Harry Potter Studies to the area chair via email or mail. Emailed proposals should be sent to Kathleen Turner, Department of English, Northern Illinois University at turner8kathleen@gmail.com. Mailed proposals should be sent to Kathleen Turner, Department of English, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115.

Gender (06/20/2009)

updated: 
Monday, May 4, 2009 - 8:19am
e-Pisteme postgraduate journal, Newcastle University

Call for Papers: GENDER

The editors invite contributions for the forthcoming issue on the theme of GENDER from postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers working across the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Suggested areas for articles include, but are not restricted to:

Cinema, Film & Television
Embodiment, Space & Time
Feminism, Anti-feminism, & Masculinism
Equality & Liberation
Gender, Sex & Androgyny
Language & Linguistics
Stylistics and Discourse
Teaching, Learning & Acquisition

Please send submissions in Microsoft Word format to: e-pisteme@ncl.ac.uk

All submissions must contain the following information:

[Update] Queering Harry Potter

updated: 
Sunday, May 3, 2009 - 7:39pm
Andrew Buzny

We seek to delve further into the mind of Rowling and examine all aspects of the Harry Potter series that lend themselves to a lavender lens. With Dumbledore's ejection from the closet, queer scholars have taken up Rowling's decision at all three major Harry Potter Conferences (Accio, Portus, and Terminus) over the summer of 2008. As such, we seek papers for an interdisciplinary reader on queer and feminist issues in Harry Potter. We welcome critical and passionate papers catering to both students and scholars in the fields of sexual/gender diversity studies, cultural studies, children's literature, and literary analysis. A non-exclusive list of topics are

CFP: Science Fiction/Fantasy/Legend NEPCA (6/1/09; Queens, NY 10/23-24/09)

updated: 
Saturday, May 2, 2009 - 3:10pm
Michael A Torregrossa/The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages

CALL FOR PAPERS
SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY, AND LEGEND AREA
2009 Conference of The Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association (NEPCA)
Queensborough Community College (Bayside, Queens, New York City) , Friday October 23 and Saturday October 24, 2009
Proposals by 1 June 2009

Proposals are invited from scholars of all levels for papers to be presented in the Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Legend Area. Presentations will be limited to 15-20 minutes in length and may address any aspect of science fiction, fantasy, and/or legends in popular culture.

Adoption: Secret Histories, Public Policies: Third International Conference on Adoption and Culture

updated: 
Saturday, May 2, 2009 - 10:17am
Marianne Novy/Sally Haslanger/Emily Hipchen/Alliance for the Study of Adoption and Culture

Adoption has often, though not always, involved secrecy. How has secrecy or openness affected the history, experience, and representations of adoption? How have literature and film portrayed the impact of secrecy and disclosure on adoptees, birthparents, adoptive parents? What is the impact of recent revelations of secret histories in memoir, books such as _The Girls Who Went Away_, documentaries such as _First Person Plural_ (the creators of both will be keynote speakers)? How and why did adoption secrecy, and the practices it hides, develop differently in different cultures, countries, and even different states? Where are alternatives to secrecy practiced and how do they work?

Call for submissions to The Clearing House

updated: 
Thursday, April 30, 2009 - 11:40am
The Clearing House: A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues, and Ideas

The Clearing House, a peer-reviewed journal, publishes material of interest to middle level and high school teachers and administrators, as well as postsecondary education faculty members and their students. The journal contains articles reporting on useful practices, research findings, and experiments. We also publish a limited number of first-person accounts and opinion pieces on controversial issues.

Studying the representation of dialect in literature: how and why? (25th September 2009)

updated: 
Thursday, April 30, 2009 - 10:22am
University of Sheffield

The study of the representation of dialects of English in literature is a well-established field, but one that is approached with a range of different goals and methodologies by scholars depending upon their disciplinary background. For literary scholars, for example, the most significant aspects of dialect in literature will often be the narrative, poetic or artistic functions of the dialect. For dialectologists, the accuracy of the literary dialect and its relationship to real-world dialects tends to be the focus. For historians of linguistics, the attitudes expressed in the text, either overtly or covertly, towards different varieties of English are frequently the most interesting elements.

"Pop Goes the Region": Regionalism and Popular Art/Literature 31 July 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 11:14pm
LiNQ: Literature in North Queensland

We are calling for academic papers, submissions of short stories and poems, and visual art that contemplate the intersection of the regional and the popular in regional Australia but also in terms of regional/global intersections more generally.

The small town, the local, and regionalism have long been considered precious territory to be guarded by grassroots music and local art movements, enshrined in high letters, and embalmed in obscurity. This issue of LiNQ (Literature in North Queensland) seeks to challenge and update this notion of the regional. As the Internet connects us in a global village of downloadable ephemera, the local community is redefined. How does the region connect with the popular?

[UPDATE] Pennsylvania Literary Journal, Summer 2009 Issue: "Experiments" – Deadline – July 6, 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 7:08pm
Pennsylvania Literary Journal – Indiana University of Pennsylvania

This is a critical and creative new online journal. It is created to find, edit and publish superior works of fiction, non-fiction, art, multi-media and the like. The Pennsylvania Literary Journal is created to make a positive contribution to literary criticism and to the arts around the world. There are no geographic boundaries or genre boundaries in the first, summer issue – only the restraints of a website template.

CFP: Recreating OZ; Oct 2-4 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 4:38pm
Erica Hateley

Recreating Oz

Annual Convention of the International Wizard of Oz Club

Manhattan, Kansas – October 2-4, 2009

Call for Papers
We invite submissions for presentations of 15 minutes in length on "Recreating Oz." Possible topics include:

* Adapting Oz for stage and screen

* Marketing and commemorating the Oz books

* Assembling the histories of Oz creators

* Teaching Oz

* Archiving Oz

* Re-reading the Oz books and earlier critical interpretations

* Re-imagining the world of Oz for contemporary audiences (Maguire's Wicked, Stauffacher's Harry Sue, the mini-series Tin Man, comics and graphic novels)

Fairy Tale Economies

updated: 
Sunday, April 26, 2009 - 7:52pm
Dr. Molly Clark Hillard: University of Southern Mississippi and Group for International Fairy Tale Studies

Fairy Tale Economies

An interdisciplinary, international conference
October 1—3, 2009
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg MS

Mindful of our own global economies, this colloquium addresses economies in fantastic literature and culture. We shall identify economy both as a theme within literatures and as a way of thinking about the value of fantastic literature itself.

Re-reading Rider Haggard (1st August)

updated: 
Saturday, April 25, 2009 - 9:45am
John Miller and Robbie McLaughlan/ University of Glasgow

Henry Rider Haggard (1856-1925) was a novelist, country gentleman, social commentator, onetime colonial administrator and failed ostrich farmer whose prodigious output comprises a significant but under-examined contribution to late nineteenth and early twentieth century literature. While his two most famous works, King Solomon's Mines (1886) and She (1887) have attracted a steady stream of articles in recent years, most notably from the fields of postcolonial and gender studies, a significant proportion of his oeuvre remains almost entirely unstudied, despite their considerable popular success in his lifetime. In order to extend and enhance Haggard scholarship we are soliciting proposals for chapters in a forthcoming edited collection of essays.

[UPDATE] States of Crisis - Graduate Conference

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 10:56pm
Brandeis University - Department of English and American Literature

States of Crisis
Friday, 9 October 2009
Brandeis University
Department of English and American Literature
Seventh Annual Graduate Conference

Since its origin in the ancient Greek krisis, "decision," related to krites, a judge, the term crisis has referred to ideas of discernment, evaluation, criticism, and sifting of evidence. In literary studies, for example, one can see moments of crisis in shifting aesthetics and changing genres as well as in literary tradition(s), character representation, and ideas of narrative. Drawing on interdisciplinary approaches and scholarship, this conference will explore different responses to the idea of crisis in the humanities and social sciences.

Pennsylvania Literary Journal, Summer 2009 Issue: "Experiments" – Deadline – July 6, 2009

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 1:55pm
Pennsylvania Literary Journal – English Literature Department, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

This is a critical and creative new journal. It is created to find, edit and publish superior works of fiction, non-fiction, art, multi-media and the like. It will be primarily an online journal. Until an independent website is developed the journal will be housed at www.myspace.com/pennsylvaniajournal.

Writing Rider Haggard

updated: 
Thursday, April 23, 2009 - 5:11am
Robbie McLaughlan and John Miller/ University of Glasgow

Henry Rider Haggard (1856-1925) was a novelist, country gentleman, social commentator, onetime colonial administrator and failed ostrich farmer whose prodigious output comprises a significant but under-examined contribution to late nineteenth and early twentieth century literature. While his two most famous works, King Solomon's Mines (1886) and She (1887) have attracted a steady stream of articles in recent years, most notably from the fields of postcolonial and gender studies, a significant proportion of his oeuvre remains almost entirely unstudied, despite their considerable popular success in his lifetime. In order to extend and enhance Haggard scholarship we are soliciting proposals for chapters in a forthcoming edited collection of essays.

"Robin Hood: Media Creature," 22-25 October 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 6:01pm
International Association for Robin Hood Studies - University of Rochester, USA

This conference solicits contributions to our understanding of the perennial outlaw hero, and the traditions surrounding his stories, from as wide a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives as possible. The conference requests proposals that expand our knowledge of medieval and early modern historical studies, literary criticism, folklore, musicology and music practice, children's literature, cultural studies, anthropology, film and media studies, performance art and oral recitations, art history, literary history and theory, and philosophy. While our historical understanding of Robin Hood inevitably depends on literary and archival records, even these cultural memories have been shaped by the media that contain them.

Steampunk! Revisions of Time and Technology. SAMLA 11/6-11/9 2009. Deadline for abstracts: May 20, 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 2:59pm
Kathryn Crowther / SAMLA

This SAMLA special session panel welcomes papers on any aspect of the Steampunk genre. Papers could address literature, film, art, or other cultural manifestations of Steampunk. Of particular interest are discussions of the ways that Steampunk engages with notions of time and historical discourse, the materiality of Steampunk, and the intersections of technology and literature. By May 20, please send a one-page abstract that includes audio/visual needs and a short vita (with complete contact information) to Kathryn Crowther, Georgia Institute of Technology at kathryn.crowther@lcc.gatech.edu

MSA 11: Vernacular Modernisms: What Are They When They're at Home?

updated: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 10:41am
Dr. Bradley D. Clissold

Although some scholarly work has investigated the ways in which various types of modernist ideas and aesthetic tendencies have found articulation and received exposure in the quotidian sphere via advertising, film, popular psychology, popular music, new (household and workplace) technologies, as well as in profound developments in travel and communication, this panel seeks to push such analysis further. Papers are sought that critically explore articulations of modernism as they occur and are experienced in the everyday lifeworld.

[General] UPDATE: Sirens, a conference on women in fantasy (10/1 - 10/4; deadline June 7)

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 6:51pm
Jessica Moore, Sirens (Narrate Conferences)



CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Sirens
Vail, CO
October 1-4, 2009
A conference on women in fantasy literature presented by Narrate
Conferences, Inc.

Sirens, a conference focused on literary contributions by women to the fantasy genre and on fantasy works with prominent female characters, will take place October 1-4, 2009, in Vail, CO. The conference seeks papers, panels, interactive workshops, roundtable discussions, and other presentations suitable for an audience of academics, professionals, educators, librarians, authors, and fantasy readers.

Science Fiction in Children's Film and Television (proposals by 05/31/09)

updated: 
Monday, April 20, 2009 - 11:51am
R.C. Neighbors/University of Arkansas



It has often been said that science fiction is a literature of ideas. Through the use of familiar tropes, such as spaceships, aliens, and ray guns, the genre uses the future (and sometimes the past) to comment on the present--on current social, cultural, and political ideologies. Likewise, media directed at children often focus on advocating or criticizing similar ideologies, often for a didactic purpose. It is interesting, then, that so little has been said about the joining of these two genres--children's science fiction--particularly when dealing with the visual media of film and television.

CFP: El Paso in the Comics II: "The Southwest in the Comics" Graduate Conference and Event

updated: 
Friday, April 17, 2009 - 11:46am
James B. Carter/ University of Texas at El Paso

CFP: El Paso in the Comics II: "The Southwest in the Comics"

Graduate students in all fields of study are invited to submit 200-word abstracts to the second-annual "El Paso in the Comics" conference and event, to be held on the campus of the University of Texas at El Paso, February 23, 2010.

Papers on all aspects of comics scholarship, theory, and pedagogy will be given attention, but those that deal with issues related to artists, creators, characters and/or themes associated with the American Southwest and/or Hispanic/Chicano culture in comics will be given top priority.

[UPDATE] CFP: Medieval TV Collection (proposals by 7/15/09)

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 12:09am
The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages

Updated CFP: Medieval TV Collection (proposals by 7/15/09)
ESSAYS ARE STILL BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE FOLLOWING:

GETTING MEDIEVAL ON TV: TELEVISUAL REPRESENTATIONS OF MEDIEVAL THEMES FROM ROAR TO THE TUDORS
ORGANIZED BY THE SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF POPULAR CULTURE AND THE MIDDLE AGES
PROPOSALS BY 7/15/09

[UPDATE] CFP: Beowulf on Film/TV/Electronic Games Collection (proposals by 12/15/09)

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 12:07am
The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages

Updated CFP: Beowulf on Film/TV/Electronic Games Collection (proposals by 12/15/09)
ESSAYS ARE STILL BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE FOLLOWING:

REEL WORLDS OF BEOWULF: REPRESENTATIONS OF BEOWULFIANA ON ELECTRONIC MULTIMEDIA
ORGANIZED BY THE SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF POPULAR CULTURE AND THE MIDDLE AGES
PROPOSALS BY 12/15/09

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