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classical studies

Publication “Bites Here and There”: Literal and Metaphorical Cannibalism across Disciplines

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 10:09am
University of Warwick
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 30, 2018

“Bites Here and There”:

Literal and Metaphorical Cannibalism across Disciplines

 

The organiser of the Bites Conference (University of Warwick, 17 November 2018) invites contributions for an edited essay collection, provisionally titled “Bites Here and There”: Literal and Metaphorical Cannibalism across Disciplines.

 

I am interested in submissions that explore instances of literal or metaphorical cannibalism across fields, and we invite abstracts on topics and disciplines including, but not limited to:

 

NeMLA 2019: Classical Metanarrative, Aesthetics, and the Creative Process

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY & NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018


Ancient Greece and Rome have had a profound influence on subsequent literature. While our analyses of Classical literature, philosophy, and art often focus on the characters and stories they depict, these works often served as a means to examine the aesthetic process itself. One of the earliest surviving Greek texts, Homer’s Iliad, goes so far as to depict its protagonist Achilles singing of ancient heroes and strumming his lyre as a means of determining the effect of being remembered in epic.

NeMLA 2019: Reading and Writing the Classics in Antiquity and Beyond

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY & NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

 

The literature of ancient Greece and Rome has survived for thousands of years. As a result, Classical literary and philosophical works have served as a profound influence on the writings of subsequent time periods. Indeed, in many subsequent time periods, the ability to quote from Classical sources became a marker of status and intelligence. However, many works of ancient Greece and Rome are not wholly original, but in fact flaunt their use of source materials, citing earlier versions of myths and epics. Often, Classical and post-Classical authors would modify their source materials, and we are able to see them not only as writers, but as readers in their own right.

Call for Essay Submissions for Pacific Coast Philology Journal

updated: 
Wednesday, August 29, 2018 - 9:43am
Pacific Coast Philology, the Journal of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 31, 2018

Pacific Coast Philology publishes peer-reviewed essays of interest to scholars in the classical and modern languages, literatures, and cultures. Essays may be submitted any time throughout the year.

Stages of Knowing in Shakespeare (NeMLA 2019 -- roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:37pm
Northeast Modern Language Association / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Shakespeare gave and withheld knowledge to craft his plot and engage his audience. We are taken on a guided ride from which we glimpse what the playwright chooses thus forming our layers of knowledge through which we are manipulated. What we know can be what we knew before attending the play, based on dialogue from the characters, or from reported speech of events off stage and even in times before the play.

 

“Complexities, Appeals, and Paradoxes of Language” International Conference

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:12pm
London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 31, 2018

Those scholars committed to an inter-disciplinary perspective on human experiences confront centuries-old divisions between and among the natural sciences, social sciences and the humanities, competing investigative methods, descriptive foci, and explanatory emphases. Bolstered by specialization, administrative demarcations, professionalization, and expertise, the discontinuities generate trajectories of intellectual enrichment and progress.  On the other hand, have scholars within these intellectual spheres, disciplines, and area studies become passing ships in the night?  What would constitute evidence of this condition, if this is, indeed, the case? Have scholars not been displaced from public discourse and social media?

Afterlives of The Odyssey

updated: 
Tuesday, July 31, 2018 - 10:16am
Jacob Jewusiak
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 10, 2018

Call for Papers, “Afterlives of The Odyssey” for the MLA International Symposium (23-25 July 2019 in Lisbon, Portugal)

Kalamazoo 2019: Beyond the Battlefield: Medieval Literature in Wartime

updated: 
Wednesday, July 25, 2018 - 9:03am
Daniel Davies (University of Pennsylvania) and Max Ashton (Stanford University)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

How does medieval war resonate beyond the battlefield? This roundtable session invites papers that consider the relationship between medieval literature and wartime. War punctuates our understanding of the Middle Ages, providing us with frameworks for comprehending and interpreting the events of history, and the corpus of literature created in response to these conditions is equally broad. In its most literal sense, wartime literature is the narration or memorialization of events on the battlefield, from the Battle of Maldon to the work of Jordan Fantosme and the poetry attributed to Laurence Minot. Wartime, however, is less a temporal or veridical marker than a loaded conceptual term. What counts as wartime? When does it begin and end?

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