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[UPDATE] 2010 AEGIS Graduate Conference in Literature and Rhet/Comp, DEADLINE EXTENDED TO JAN 2ND 2010

updated: 
Thursday, November 19, 2009 - 2:30pm
Rich Angle, AEGIS Graduate Student Organization, Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Call for Papers: Community and Conflict

2010 Southern Illinois University-Carbondale Graduate Conference in Literature and Rhetoric/Composition

4th Annual Conference in Carbondale, Illinois

Dates: March 26 & 27, 2010

Registration Fee: $25

The Southern Illinois University-Carbondale's Association of English Graduate Instructors and Students (AEGIS) will be holding its 4th annual AEGIS conference at the SIUC Student Center. Please join us as a first-time or returning panel participant, speaker, or chair for conference experience and conversation within our discipline.

CSU Fullerton's Annual Graduate Conference, February 5-6, 2010 (Revised Deadline)

updated: 
Wednesday, November 18, 2009 - 3:30pm
Acacia Group

CSU Fullerton's Annual Graduate Conference, February 5-6, 2010
The Acacia Group at Cal State Fullerton, an organization of English graduate students and faculty members committed to developing student scholastic advancement while fostering a strong sense of academic community, is currently accepting proposals for its annual graduate conference.

While the Acacia Conference is organized to meet the needs of graduate students and faculty, we welcome contributions from academics at all levels.

[UPDATE] The Aural Archive, ACLA, April 1-4, 2010, New Orleans (11/23/09)

updated: 
Wednesday, November 18, 2009 - 10:25am
Michael Cohen, Louisiana State University; Sarah J. Townsend, New York University

"The Aural Archive"

ACLA annual convention, New Orleans, April 1-4, 2010

Proposals due: Nov. 23, 2009 [Deadline extended]

This seminar aims to draw out several theoretical and methodological questions lurking behind recent work in media studies, performance studies, musicology, and literary studies: If the aural realm is ephemeral (as is often said), how does it factor into the historical record? When you listen to your archive, what and how do you hear? And how do you theorize the silences and noises in the archival grain?

PAMLA Conference, Chaminade University, Honolulu, Hawaii (November 13-14, 2010; special session proposal deadline Dec. 15, 2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2009 - 10:43pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association

The Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) is hosting its 108th Annual Conference, on Saturday and Sunday, November 13-14, 2010, at Chaminade University, Honolulu, Hawaii. Interested parties may propose special sessions on specific topics by December 15, 2009.

UPDATE: African American Life Writing

updated: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2009 - 9:57pm
a/b: autobiography

_a/b: Auto/Biography Studies_ invites submissions for a special issue focusing on African American life writing. We are interested in essays that focus on the contemporary issues of identity that complicate the categories "African American" and "life writing," particularly where these intersect with discussions of genre or discipline. We would like especially to see essays addressing neglected texts, authors, or forms, including life writing in new or neglected media. Essays that advance new approaches to African American life writing, emphasize new critical approaches, discuss lesser known authors, or that address larger generic issues within African American life writing are welcome.

[UPDATE] Watermark Journal--Submission Deadline 1/8/2010

updated: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2009 - 7:32pm
CSULB Graduate English Department

Watermark, an annual scholarly journal published by graduate students in the Department of English at California State University, Long Beach, is now seeking papers for our fourth volume to be published in May 2010.

Watermark is dedicated to publishing original critical and theoretical papers concerned with literature of all genres and periods, as well as papers representing current issues in the fields of rhetoric and composition. As this journal is intended to provide a forum for emerging voices, only student work will be considered.

Watermark Grad Journal 2010-Submission Deadline 1/8/2010

updated: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2009 - 7:07pm
CSULB Graduate English Department

WATERMARK CALL FOR PAPERS
Watermark, an annual scholarly journal published by graduate students in the Department of English at California State University, Long Beach, is now seeking papers for our third volume to be published in May 2010. Watermark is dedicated to publishing original critical and theoretical papers concerned with literature of all genres and periods, as well as papers representing current issues in the fields of rhetoric and composition. As this
journal is intended to provide a forum for emerging voices, only student work will be considered.

"Righting" and "Re-Writing" Wrongs" ACLA Annual Meeting April 1-4, 2010

updated: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2009 - 6:01pm
Deborah Donig/ ACLA

Each new textual creation is in some way a reflection or mimesis. All literary creations are beholden to some narrative ancestor, some antecedent form, some prior idea. Our knowledge of the present moment, and our ability to tell of it, relies on how — and whether — past narratives were constructed. Stories depend on the stories that were told before them.

This is doubly the case with the sequel; for the offspring owes its very genesis directly to its predecessor, from which the sequel must then draw its cues.

SCMLA Conference on Christianity and Literature session, October 28-30 2010

updated: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2009 - 11:34am
South Central Modern Language Association Regional Conference

South Central MLA 2010
Conference on Christianity and Literature Session
October 28-30, at the Sheraton Forth Worth Hotel

The 2010 SCMLA Conference on Christianity and Literature session seeks papers that examine the connections between Christianity and literature. Especially welcome are those papers which respond to the conference theme "New Frontiers." Papers are invited from any discipline, on any time period or genre.

Please send 300-word abstracts or panel proposals by January 31, 2010 to Jessica Hooten, English Department, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, 900 College Street, Belton, TX 76513 or jhooten@umhb.edu.

[UPDATE] Nov.13, 2010 The 18th Annual English and American Literature Association Conference: Everyday Life and Literature

updated: 
Monday, November 16, 2009 - 7:56pm
English and American Literature Association of the Republic of China in Taiwan (EALA Taiwan) &Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures,National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan

Literature is related to everyday life in a subtle way. Everyday life often manifests itself as the textual Other outside the major narrative thrust, and, therefore, receives scant critical attention in literary studies. In fact everyday life can be seen as an arena of two-way negotiation: it is where power reproduces itself in daily practice, but it is also where both personal and collective creativity intervenes in the reproduction of power. Moreover, everyday life often emerges, becomes visible, or acquires meaning through its engagement with other social categories—gender, race, class, ethnicity, nature, and so on, whose different relations with dominant regimes of power call for different strategies of everyday life practices.

Undergraduates, Get Your History Papers Published! Submit to HISTORY MATTERS: An Undergraduate Journal of Historical Research

updated: 
Monday, November 16, 2009 - 12:05pm
HISTORY MATTERS: An Undergraduate Journal of Historical Research

HISTORY MATTERS is a journal whose purpose is to give undergraduates the unique opportunity to be published. Established in 2004, History Matters has received papers from all over the U.S., Canada, Britain, and Australia.

HISTORY MATTERS is published each spring and is edited by undergraduates with the help of a faculty board. The journal consistently publishes about 10% of the submissions, publishing only the papers with high caliber research and writing. Please visit the journal homepage at http://www.historymatters.appstate.edu for more information.

Nov. 13, 2010 18th Annual English and American Literature: Everyday Life and Literature

updated: 
Monday, November 16, 2009 - 1:52am
English and American Literature Association of the Republicof China in Taiwan (EALA Taiwan) &Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan

Literature is related to everyday life in a subtle way. Everyday life often manifests itself as the textual Other outside the major narrative thrust, and, therefore, receives scant critical attention in literary studies. In fact everyday life can be seen as an arena of two-way negotiation: it is where power reproduces itself in daily practice, but it is also where both personal and collective creativity intervenes in the reproduction of power. Moreover, everyday life often emerges, becomes visible, or acquires meaning through its engagement with other social categories—gender, race, class, ethnicity, nature, and so on, whose different relations with dominant regimes of power call for different strategies of everyday life practices.

Go Green: Die Germanistik und grünes Gedankengut, The 1st Montreal German Studies Graduate Student Conference 23-25 April 2010

updated: 
Sunday, November 15, 2009 - 9:14pm
McGill University & Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

The 4th graduate conference at McGill and the 1st in collaboration with Université de Montréal, this year's theme sees its justification in the steady rise of awareness toward environmental issues, a concern not solely limited to the political or scientific worlds, but also prevalent within the humanities. This awareness is corroborated, but at times also corrupted by the abundance of news coverage in the mainstream media that have increasingly presented climate change with an apocalyptic outlook.

[UPDATE] Call for Exemplary Undergraduate Humanities Essays

updated: 
Friday, November 13, 2009 - 3:34pm
Valley Humanities Review

The Valley Humanities Review is currently seeking essays in the humanities for publication in its Spring 2010 Issue. We seek essays of high quality, intellectual rigor and originality that challenge or contribute substantially to ongoing conversations in the humanities. Topics may include but are not limited to: literature, history, religion, philosophy, art, art history and foreign languages. VHR is also currently seeking poetry submissions; students may submit up to three poems. VHR is committed to undergraduate research and scholarship in the field; therefore, we only accept submissions by current or recently graduated undergraduate students. Our reading period runs from September 1 to December 15 of each year.

T. S. Eliot Society at American Literature Association Conference, May 27-30 2010

updated: 
Friday, November 13, 2009 - 11:53am
T. S. Eliot Society

The T. S. Eliot Society will
sponsor two sessions at the 2010 Annual Conference of the American
Literature Association, May 27–30, at the Hyatt Regency in San
Francisco. Please send proposals or abstracts(up to 250 words), along
with a curriculum vitae, electronically to Professor Lee Oser
(leeoser@holycross.edu). Submissions must be received no later than
January 15, 2010.

UPDATE: ACLA: Allegories of Language (New Orleans 1-4 April 2010; abstract by 11/23)

updated: 
Friday, November 13, 2009 - 4:26am
American Comparative Literature Association

Allegory has long been situated in a metaphorical-metaphysical scheme that presumes a hierarchical relationship between word and meaning. One way to rethink this relationship is to consider allegory as intrinsic to language itself (rather than as some meaning located outside of language) and how this view might challenge a hierarchical structure of reference. By bracketing this hierarchical relationship, we can consider the allegory of language itself. Allegory enables one to say two things at once, what one says in words and what one says other than in words. Allegory thus speaks a language that is also other to itself.

CFP: International Association for Philosophy and Literature

updated: 
Thursday, November 12, 2009 - 1:14am
International Association for Philosophy and Literature

Call for Papers and Proposed Sessions
34th Annual Conference
The International Association for Philosophy and Literature
to be held at the University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada,
24-30 May 2010
Topic: CULTURES OF DIFFERENCES: national / indigenous / historical

For submissions and more information, please visit http://www.iapl.info/
Deadline for Submissions: 30 November 2009.

[UPDATE] Visual Arts in the 21st Century

updated: 
Wednesday, November 11, 2009 - 8:47am
Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities

In the wake of the digital revolution and globalisation policies the whole world is witnessing formation of certain conditions which are having and will continue to have tremendous impact on the production, reproduction, access, dissemination and appreciation of visual arts. While the old art forms and artworks are being revisited and reproduced in wholly new ways and for a variety of purposes, new types in the forms of digital arts are surfacing not only on the internet but also every place of our visual culture. The place and workplace of the artist also has undergone a radical change.

Paths of Progress (?)

updated: 
Wednesday, November 11, 2009 - 12:36am
California State University, Northridge - Associated Graduate Students of English

In historical periods of intense political unrest or in calls for social reformation, the written word has encompassed the energy and fervor of such revolutionary moments. From the political pamphlets distributed during the French Revolution to the Industrial Revolution that marked a monumental shift in the United States and around the world in regards to labor laws and technological advancements, the idea of "progress" and pushing social expectations forward into a new mode of thought has permeated our culture for centuries. However, as scholars sit in the 21st century and contemplate the social reforms of the past, how do we recognize this notion of "progress"?

CFP - Glossator: Practice and Theory of the Commentary (March 2010)

updated: 
Tuesday, November 10, 2009 - 7:23am
Nicola Masciandaro, CUNY

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

The editors of Glossator: Practice and Theory of the Commentary (glossator.org) invite submissions of COMMENTARIES for the next open issue, Fall 2010. Essays and articles relating to commentary will also be considered.

Spectrum calling for submissions DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 12, 2010

updated: 
Monday, November 9, 2009 - 11:13pm
Spectrum Literary Magazine

SPECTRUM is an annual journal of art and literature published by UC Santa Barbara's College of Creative Studies. Founded in 1957, it is the longest-standing literary magazine in the UC system. We accept art, poetry, fiction, and non-fiction works from everyone, regardless of age or school affiliation. Art can be either black and white or in color. Any form of poetry and any genre of fiction is allowed; non-fiction works can range from interviews, personal essays, and creative or scholarly essays. We do not follow themes and no subject will be censored.
http://www.ccs.ucsb.edu/spectrum/submissions.html

Call for Responses to Recent Probable Cause Finding of Racial Discrimination, Due January 2, 2010

updated: 
Monday, November 9, 2009 - 6:29pm
Widener Journal of Law, Economics and Race

In response to the Pennsylvania Human Relations Committee's recent finding of probable cause of racial discrimination at a suburban Philadelphia swim club, the Widener Journal of Law, Economics and Race (WJLER) requests the submissions of comments by scholars of any discipline reflecting the racial, economic and legal aspects of this case. A PDF copy of the findings can be found on our website at www.wjler.org. Comments should be approximately 5-8 pages in length, double-spaced, with one-inch margins, include the author's name on the first page of the comment, and contain footnotes that conform to proper Bluebook format.

ACLA: Allegories of Language (New Orleans 1-4 April 2010; abstract by 11/13)

updated: 
Monday, November 9, 2009 - 4:13pm
American Comparative Literature Association

Allegory has long been situated in a metaphorical-metaphysical scheme that presumes a hierarchical relationship between word and meaning. One way to rethink this relationship is to consider allegory as intrinsic to language itself (rather than as some meaning located outside of language) and how this view might challenge a hierarchical structure of reference. By bracketing this hierarchical relationship, we can consider the allegory of language itself. Allegory enables one to say two things at once, what one says in words and what one says other than in words. Allegory thus speaks a language that is also other to itself.

Transverse, U of T's comp lit grad journal, is accepting papers ON CENSORSHIP (Deadline: March 1)

updated: 
Sunday, November 8, 2009 - 2:57pm
Transverse, grad journal @ the Centre for Comparative Literature, University of Toronto

CALL FOR PAPERS: Transverse 2009-2010: Censorship

I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it. (Voltaire)
The dirtiest book of all is the expurgated book. (Walt Whitman)

Transverse, the graduate journal of the University of Toronto's Centre for Comparative Literature, welcomes academic papers, literary reviews, creative writing, and art on the topic of Censorship. The journal will be published online in the spring of 2010 at chass.utoronto.ca/complitstudents/transverse

Disability and the Enlightenment

updated: 
Sunday, November 8, 2009 - 11:24am
Dwight Codr/ South Central Society for Eighteenth Century Studies

Although scholars have long recognized the centrality of the body in the cultural productions of "Enlightenment" England -- whether it be in terms of empiricism or sensibility, in the context of acting on stage or walking the streets of London -- the history of the disabled body has played a conspicuously minor role in these investigations. One of the reasons for the absence of a vigorous discussion of disability in the eighteenth century may have to do with the belief that such a discussion might be anachronistic, eighteenth-century England having had no operative category of disability.

The Fictional North

updated: 
Friday, November 6, 2009 - 10:48pm
Sue Matheson, University College of the North, The Pas, Manitoba, Canada

The Fictional North: Call for Papers

The University College of the North invites submissions for an upcoming conference,
The Fictional North, to be held at The Pas Campus in The Pas, Manitoba, March 30-
April 1, 2010.

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