classical studies

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Crossing Boundaries: Towards an Interdisciplinary Medieval Studies (Deadline Extended)

updated: 
Thursday, January 3, 2019 - 4:33am
Pearl Kibre Medieval Study / The Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, January 31, 2019

Crossing Boundaries: Towards an Interdisciplinary Medieval Studies

The 14th Annual Pearl Kibre Medieval Study Graduate Student Conference

Date: May 4, 2018 

Location: The Graduate Center, CUNY 

Keynote Speaker: Shirin Khanmohamadi, San Francisco State University

Return, Resistance, Resilience, and Recovery: UCSD Department of Literature's First Annual Graduate Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, December 4, 2018 - 2:43pm
UC San Diego
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

UC San Diego’s Department of Literature is excited to announce our first annual graduate conference. This year’s theme, “Return, Resistance, Resilience, and Recovery,” embraces the complexities of the prefix “post-” in “post-apocalypse.” We are happy to confirm Dr. Shelley Streeby as our keynote speaker; her work on science fiction, climate change, and activism along with her experience in Literature, Ethnic Studies, and the Critical Gender Studies Program will especially enrich our interdisciplinary discussion!

 

"Studia Ceranea" 2019

updated: 
Tuesday, December 4, 2018 - 8:36am
„Studia Ceranea. Journal of the Waldemar Ceran Research Centre for the History and Culture of the Mediterranean Area and South-East Europe”
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Authors are invited to submit articles for publication in „Studia Ceranea. Journal of the Waldemar Ceran Research Centre for the History and Culture of the Mediterranean Area and South-East Europe” 9/2019. Manuscripts should be submitted through Open Journal Systems:  https://czasopisma.uni.lodz.pl/sceranea/user/register by April 30th, 2019.

Pierre Coustillas and George Gissing

updated: 
Monday, November 26, 2018 - 12:00pm
Tom Ue / Department of English, Dalhousie University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 25, 2019

In celebration of the life and works of the eminent scholar Pierre Coustillas (1930-2018), we invite contributions for proposed panel(s) on Coustillas, George Gissing, and their writing to the Annual Literary London Society Conference. This meeting will be held on 11-12 July 2019 at the Institute of English Studies in the University of London. Coustillas has had a profound influence on Gissing and nineteenth-century studies. From 1969 to April 2013, he edited The Gissing Newsletter and subsequently The Gissing Journal, the organ for Gissing studies. In 1997, Paul F. Mattheisen, Arthur C. Young, and Coustillas completed their landmark project: The Collected Letters of George Gissing.

Political Performances Working Group at IFTR Shanghai 2019

updated: 
Monday, November 5, 2018 - 10:31am
International Federation of Theatre Research - Political Performances Working Group
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 7, 2019

We would like to invite researchers to submit their abstracts to the Political Performances Working Group at the 2019 IFTR conference, which will take place on 8-12 July in Shanghai, China. The theme for the 2019 conference is Theatre, Performance, and Urbanism. We have identified three loose strands that reflect the recent work of many researchers in the wider field of political performances, but that also align with the 2019 conference theme. The Political Performances Working Group therefore invites proposals for papers on the following topics:

(A)     Citizenship

[Reminder] Comparative Drama Conference Abstract Deadline Approaching

updated: 
Wednesday, October 31, 2018 - 8:56am
Comparative Drama Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 3, 2018

43rd Comparative Drama ConferenceText & PresentationCall for PapersApril 4-6, 2019Orlando, Florida

 

2019 Keynote EventApril 5, 2019     8 p.m. (followed by a reception)                              Annie Russell Theatre, Rollins College

 

Keynote Q&A:  Branden Jacobs-Jenkins                               Interviewed by Baron Kelly, University of Louisville

 

Postmodern and postcolonial intersections

updated: 
Thursday, October 11, 2018 - 9:22am
University of Gafsa, Tunisia
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 28, 2018

This study day aims to bring researchers together to debate the postmodern and postcolonial intersections in literary and cultural studies. Grounded in contemporary postmodern and postcolonial thematic and aesthetic concerns, the study day will attempt to explore the confluences of the two theoretical trends, the discursive spaces offered by the first to the second. In this regard, relations between the East and the West and how such relations are presented and re-represented in multifarious ways in the writing and re-writing of literary and cultural texts are investigated.

CFP: Myth and Fairy Tales Area of Southwest Popular/American Culture (SWPACA) 2019

updated: 
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 3:43pm
Southwest Popular/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

Call for Papers

 

Myth and Fairy Tales

 

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA)

 

 

 

40th Annual Conference, February 20-23, 2019

 

Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center

 

Albuquerque, New Mexico

 

http://www.southwestpca.org

 

Proposal submission deadline: November 1, 2018

 

 

 

CFP Volume 9 of Apollon Digital Journal

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2018 - 4:09pm
Apollon Undergraduate Digital Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

Apollon intends to publish superior examples of undergraduate humanities research from a variety of disciplines as well as intellectual approaches.

Publication “Bites Here and There”: Literal and Metaphorical Cannibalism across Disciplines

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 10:09am
University of Warwick
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 30, 2018

“Bites Here and There”:

Literal and Metaphorical Cannibalism across Disciplines

 

The organiser of the Bites Conference (University of Warwick, 17 November 2018) invites contributions for an edited essay collection, provisionally titled “Bites Here and There”: Literal and Metaphorical Cannibalism across Disciplines.

 

I am interested in submissions that explore instances of literal or metaphorical cannibalism across fields, and we invite abstracts on topics and disciplines including, but not limited to:

 

NeMLA 2019: Classical Metanarrative, Aesthetics, and the Creative Process

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY & NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018


Ancient Greece and Rome have had a profound influence on subsequent literature. While our analyses of Classical literature, philosophy, and art often focus on the characters and stories they depict, these works often served as a means to examine the aesthetic process itself. One of the earliest surviving Greek texts, Homer’s Iliad, goes so far as to depict its protagonist Achilles singing of ancient heroes and strumming his lyre as a means of determining the effect of being remembered in epic.

NeMLA 2019: Reading and Writing the Classics in Antiquity and Beyond

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY & NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

 

The literature of ancient Greece and Rome has survived for thousands of years. As a result, Classical literary and philosophical works have served as a profound influence on the writings of subsequent time periods. Indeed, in many subsequent time periods, the ability to quote from Classical sources became a marker of status and intelligence. However, many works of ancient Greece and Rome are not wholly original, but in fact flaunt their use of source materials, citing earlier versions of myths and epics. Often, Classical and post-Classical authors would modify their source materials, and we are able to see them not only as writers, but as readers in their own right.

Call for Essay Submissions for Pacific Coast Philology Journal

updated: 
Wednesday, August 29, 2018 - 9:43am
Pacific Coast Philology, the Journal of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 31, 2018

Pacific Coast Philology publishes peer-reviewed essays of interest to scholars in the classical and modern languages, literatures, and cultures. Essays may be submitted any time throughout the year.

“Complexities, Appeals, and Paradoxes of Language” International Conference

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:12pm
London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 31, 2018

Those scholars committed to an inter-disciplinary perspective on human experiences confront centuries-old divisions between and among the natural sciences, social sciences and the humanities, competing investigative methods, descriptive foci, and explanatory emphases. Bolstered by specialization, administrative demarcations, professionalization, and expertise, the discontinuities generate trajectories of intellectual enrichment and progress.  On the other hand, have scholars within these intellectual spheres, disciplines, and area studies become passing ships in the night?  What would constitute evidence of this condition, if this is, indeed, the case? Have scholars not been displaced from public discourse and social media?

Stages of Knowing in Shakespeare (NeMLA 2019 -- roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:37pm
Northeast Modern Language Association / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Shakespeare gave and withheld knowledge to craft his plot and engage his audience. We are taken on a guided ride from which we glimpse what the playwright chooses thus forming our layers of knowledge through which we are manipulated. What we know can be what we knew before attending the play, based on dialogue from the characters, or from reported speech of events off stage and even in times before the play.

 

Afterlives of The Odyssey

updated: 
Tuesday, July 31, 2018 - 10:16am
Jacob Jewusiak
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 10, 2018

Call for Papers, “Afterlives of The Odyssey” for the MLA International Symposium (23-25 July 2019 in Lisbon, Portugal)

Kalamazoo 2019: Beyond the Battlefield: Medieval Literature in Wartime

updated: 
Wednesday, July 25, 2018 - 9:03am
Daniel Davies (University of Pennsylvania) and Max Ashton (Stanford University)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

How does medieval war resonate beyond the battlefield? This roundtable session invites papers that consider the relationship between medieval literature and wartime. War punctuates our understanding of the Middle Ages, providing us with frameworks for comprehending and interpreting the events of history, and the corpus of literature created in response to these conditions is equally broad. In its most literal sense, wartime literature is the narration or memorialization of events on the battlefield, from the Battle of Maldon to the work of Jordan Fantosme and the poetry attributed to Laurence Minot. Wartime, however, is less a temporal or veridical marker than a loaded conceptual term. What counts as wartime? When does it begin and end?

Poetics and Politics of Translation and Rewriting in Early Modern Literature in English (Northeast Modern Language Association 50th Anniversary Convention)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 9:48am
Emiliano Gutierrez Popoca/ Brandeis University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The achievements of Early Modern literature in English evince the relevance of translation for literary history. The impact of translation on the development of new literary modes and genres during this period is often acknowledged. It is clear, for instance, that the sonnet in English, both as a verse form and as a mode of individual lyrical expression, is traced to its introduction to the English tradition through Wyatt and Surrey’s translations of Petrarch’s Canzoniere.

Seeing the (Im)Material: Visual Detail, Abstraction, and Artifice in Medieval Texts

updated: 
Monday, July 16, 2018 - 9:34am
50th Anniversary Northeast Modern Language Association Convention, to be held in Washington, D.C., from March 21st through the 24th, 2019.
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The literature produced by the communities of early Northern Europe, where the elements of craft and material culture informed the descriptive matter of both poetry and prose, has left a legacy which demands critical analysis of the ways in which the trappings of the real and the imaginary were represented.  What were the relationships between figurative language, mimetic representation, the production of craft, and perceptions shaped by the visual arts?  Did the allegories, symbols, emblems, fancies, and verisimilitude of literature in Old and Middle English, Old Norse/Icelandic, Early Welsh, or Early Irish provide opportunities to discuss the interface of descriptive writing with other modes of representation?  Potential papers are asked to cons

1818-2018 – the silent revolution: of fears, folly & the female

updated: 
Thursday, July 12, 2018 - 12:34pm
Universidade Catolica Portuguesa
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 30, 2018

1818-2018 – the silent revolution: of fears, folly & the female

Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Lisbon

5-6 November 2018

 

In 2018 we celebrate events which took place two hundred years ago: the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and the birth of Emily Brontë. While the two events are markedly different, as the former is a tangible work of art and the latter more of a promise of what was to come, both have contributed to challenge and change the conceptions and perceptions of the time, thus performing a silent, subtle revolution in the world of letters.

 

Rewriting and Adapting Classical Women in the Italian Renaissance (RSA 2019)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 10:41am
Victoria Fanti
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 25, 2018

From compendia of “illustrious women” modelled on Boccaccio’s De mulieribus claris, to Machiavelli’s Lucrezia in the Mandragola, to Giambattista Gelli’s (male-driven) philosophical dialogue La Circe, women from the classical tradition are resurrected in many forms and to many ends over the course of the Italian Renaissance. This panel seeks to investigate how authors and intellectuals rewrote, revised, and (in some cases) reclaimed classical women in Renaissance Italian discourse and literature. 

Topics, authors, and questions that papers might address include, but are not limited to:

What Is Dead May Never Die: Italian Revivals of the Tragic (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 10:34am
Victoria Fanti
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

In today’s mass media landscape, reports of domestic tragedies, inexplicable violence, and familial collapse have become staples of the 24-hour news cycle. Meanwhile, television series like Game of Thrones (Il Trono di Spade) and soap operas like The Bold and the Beautiful (Beautiful) sensationalize transgressions like parricide, incest, and tyrannical impulses to massive global success.

Free Will and the Subjective Agency of Women in Dante's Commedia

updated: 
Thursday, July 5, 2018 - 11:42am
NeMLA 2019, Washington DC
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Free Will, defined by Dante's Virgilio as the noble power to guide and constrain the soul's natural inclination and desires (Purg 18.73),  holds a place of central concern in the Commedia. Elaborating on Marco Lombardo's discourse, the roman poet asserts that it is Free Will that accounts for the justice in feeling joy for doing good and misery for doing ill. While offering a general outline of the fundamental importance of Free Will in the ethical and moral rationale for the fate of departed souls, the pilgrim's first guide promises that Beatrice will provide clarity on this and other topics of particular complexity beyond the purview of his Classical pagan understanding.

Greco-Roman Myth in Literature and/or the Arts

updated: 
Tuesday, July 3, 2018 - 10:55am
Ronnie Ancona
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) has recently added Classics as a secondary area of inquiry under Comparative Literature.  Please consider submitting an abstract for a panel on Greco-Roman Myth in Literature and/or the Arts, which I will be chairing, for the 50th anniversary convention to be held in Washington DC March 21-24, 2019.

 

Since Classics is a new secondary area of inquiry for NeMLA, this session attempts to cast its net quite broadly. The intention is to appeal to classicists or others dealing with Greco-Roman literature, history, archaeology, and culture and its later reception for abstracts that will have wide appeal to the NeMLA audience.

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