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[UPDATE] Early Modern Dis/Locations: An Interdisciplinary Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2009 - 8:47am
Northumbria University

Early Modern Dis/Locations: An Interdisciplinary Conference,
Northumbria University, 15-16 January 2010

On 15-16 January 2010, Northumbria University in Newcastle (UK) will host an interdisciplinary conference on Early Modern Dis/Locations.

Confirmed Plenary Speakers include:
Tim Cresswell (Royal Holloway, University of London)
Patricia Fumerton (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Lisa Hopkins (Sheffield Hallam University)
Bernhard Klein (University of Kent)
Greg Walker (University of Edinburgh)

This is Nowhere: Local, Regional and Provincial Spaces in World Literature - 24 October 2009 (Deadline: June 1st 2009)

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 5:33pm
UC Berkeley, Graduate Program in Comparative Literature

For all their complexity, recent discussions of cosmopolitanism, comparativism, and world literature have tended to privilege the global over the local, the macro over the micro, and the city over the country. These discussions have prompted us to ask some of the following questions: what constitutes a small town, region, province, village, settlement, or other small-scale community? How have these and other terms historically been used by the cultural centers from which most discourse is generated? What does it mean to speak or write from a local or regional community within the context of the world republic of letters? How is this related to or different from writing for a small-scale community?

[UPDATE] CFP: Medieval TV Collection (proposals by 7/15/09)

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 12:09am
The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages

Updated CFP: Medieval TV Collection (proposals by 7/15/09)
ESSAYS ARE STILL BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE FOLLOWING:

GETTING MEDIEVAL ON TV: TELEVISUAL REPRESENTATIONS OF MEDIEVAL THEMES FROM ROAR TO THE TUDORS
ORGANIZED BY THE SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF POPULAR CULTURE AND THE MIDDLE AGES
PROPOSALS BY 7/15/09

Remixing Critical Theory: Literacy Theory as Literary Criticism; 4Cs / CCCC 2010 Panel; 4/22

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 3:20pm
Nicole duPlessis / Texas A&M University

Eldred and Mortensen, in their article "Reading Literacy Narratives" published in College English (1992), call for the movement of literacy studies "in one important direction: into the study of literary texts" (512). Toward this goal, the article identifies categories of literacy-centered literary texts: the "literacy myth," "narratives of socialization," "literature of the contact zone," and "literacy narratives" (Eldred and Mortensen 512-513). However, to date, this article has failed to make a significant impact on literary criticism.

Women Readers/Educational Texts 1500-1800

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 1:58pm
Dr Pollie Bromilow University of Liverpool

First Call for Papers

Women Readers/Educational Texts 1500-1800

A three-day international conference at the University of Liverpool
April 14th-16th 2010

Re(Viewing) the Landscape of Visual Rhetoric: Topics in Visual Rhetoric; SAMLA Conf. Nov 6-8, 2009; Abstracts Due May 31, 2009

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 11:52am
Mary Hocks, English Dept, Georgia State University

RE(VIEWING) THE LANDSCAPE OF VISUAL RHETORIC: TOPICS IN VISUAL RHETORIC
The SAMLA special session on visual rhetoric welcomes paper, panel, and performance proposals on topics that deal with all aspects of visual rhetoric, such as visual culture and the Web; teaching visual rhetoric in the classroom; image use in blogs; exploring identities with visual rhetoric; visual rhetoric in student writing; (re)presentations of the body; visual rhetoric in politics; visual rhetoric of physical spaces; visual rhetoric and environmental issues; and other relevant topics.

"The Future ain't what it used to be" - PROPOSALS: MAY 15th 2009 / CONFERENCE: 17th JUNE 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 1:05pm
The Future ain't what it used to be: Interactions of Past, Present and Future in Literature and Visual Media - Postgraduate Conference

"The Future ain't what it used to be" is the seventh annual Postgraduate Conference held by the English Programme, University of Dundee. It will investigate questions such as: how have perspectives of the future changed over time, how is the future perceived in literature and the media today, and how do representations of the past help us to imagine the future? Proposals should be 300 words long, for papers lasting 20 minutes. The deadline for proposals is 15th May 2009.

For more information contact Laura Findlay (l.f.findlay@dundee.ac.uk), or go to www.dundee.ac.uk/english/index.htm

CFP: Translation, Performance and Reception of Greek Drama, 1900-1950: International Dialogues. Comparative Drama Special Issue

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 1:36pm
Amanda Wrigley



Proposals are invited for essays on the translation, performance and reception of ancient Greek drama in the period between and around the two world wars—so, very broadly speaking 1900-1950.

Essays which have an international focus or dimension are particularly encouraged: for example, discussions of translations and adaptations which engage with international politics; considerations of intercontinental trends in Greek play performance; or essays on the various receptions of internationally touring productions (such as Max Reinhardt's Oedipus, 1910-12, Harley Granville-Barker and Lillah McCarthy's Amercian tour of Trojan Women and Iphigenia in Tauris, 1915).

Semiotics of Revelation

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 12:41pm
International Association for Semiotic Studies

The roundtable will focus on the semiotic implications of the idea of revelation. What are the characteristics of meaning that is produced, communicated, and received as "revealed"? Are there anthropological, or even bio-logical constants in such characteristics, or do they rather vary according to socio-cultural contexts and historical époques? What terms express the idea of revelation in the different natural languages, and with which semantic connotations? What values are attributed to the idea of a revelation of meaning, and what, on the contrary, to a meaning that is non-revealed? What relations of rupture, or tension, obtain between these different valorizations? Through what narratives is the idea of a revealed meaning elaborated?

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