cultural studies and historical approaches

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Real and Imagined Readers, a session sponsored by the Society for Critical Exchange at NeMLA 2022

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:44pm
Scott DeShong
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

What determines the readership of a text or other medium, and how does such determination occur? Who are the imagined readers of a specific work, or a genre of literature or media, and how is this legible in textual features, modes of dissemination, implicit or explicit intentions of authors, or histories of reception? How do real readers encounter such assumptions or positionings and accept or resist them? Which works reach more homogeneous audiences, which garner multiple or intersecting ones, and how do audiences shift over time? Do readers have the power to choose their identities as readers? Abstracts for 15-20 minute papers: submit to https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/login

Call for chapters on Body & Embodiment: Social Scientific and Interdisciplinary Approaches

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:37pm
Jackie Hogan, Bradley University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 20, 2021

Call for Chapter Proposals or Chapters:

Edited volume Consuming Bodies: Body Commodification and Embodiment in Late Capitalist Societies

 

Editors:

Jackie Hogan (Professor of Sociology and Anthropology, Bradley University)

Fae Chubin (Assistant Professor of Sociology, Bradley University)

Sarah Whetstone (Assistant Professor of Sociology, Bradley University)

 

Race and Identities in Latinx Representations in Literature and Film (NEMLA 2022)

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:36pm
José Lara / Bridgewater State University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Most cultural representations of the Latinx community produced in the United States have historically reduced this population to stereotypes or caricatures. Nevertheless, there is a new wave of cultural phenomena (literature, films, tv series, etc.) that has not only challenged these exaggerated and erroneous representations but has also sought to breathe complexity into real Latinx subjectivities and experiences. This panel welcomes essays that discuss new forms and interpretations of the histories and traditions of the Latinx communities present in literature and film. We are particularly interested in works that delve into the intersections of race and identity in Latinx production and self/representation.

Animal Heroes, Villains and Others: the Narrative Functions of Strange and Familiar Creatures in Film and Television

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:36pm
Dr. Karin Beeler and Dr. Stan Beeler
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 15, 2021

CALL FOR CHAPTERS /CFP for Edited Volume

 

Animal Heroes, Villains and Others: the Narrative Functions of Strange and Familiar Creatures in Film and Television

 

Deadline for Submission of Proposals: July 15, 2021

 

Name: Dr. Karin Beeler and Dr. Stan Beeler

 

Contact emails: Karin.Beeler@unbc.ca and Stan.Beeler@unbc.ca

 

Dune, from Herbert to Villeneuve (PAMLA, roundtable, conducted remotely)

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:36pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (Annual Convention, Las Vegas, November 12-15, 2021, https://pamla.ballastacademic.com/Home/S/18273)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

Frank Herbert’s Dune (1965) is as celebrated as it is because of its depth and complexity, of course. It’s also, however, presumably, because its storyline, and that of its two initial sequels, Dune Messiah (1969) and Children of Dune (1976), of a crusade led by a prophet with superhuman abilities and its legacy, resonated with readers awash in social and political turbulence. It’s not difficult to imagine, then, that adaptations have emerged at regular intervals for similar reasons, beginning with David Lynch’s Dune (1984), John Harrison’s Dune (2000) and Children of Dune (2003), and now Denis Villeneuve’s forthcoming Dune (2021).

Oceanic Mobility, a special issue of JEMCS

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:35pm
Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 1, 2021

Oceanic Mobility

A special issue of The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies

edited by Jane Hwang Degenhardt and Benjamin VanWagoner


 

NeMLA 2022 - Exploring Plurality: Queering Feminism(s), Neoliberalism, and the Commodification of Intersectionality

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:34pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Feminism does not exist in singularity, and its plurality centers disenfranchised narratives and perspectives. Due to the interwoven structural oppressions based on the social construct of identities, intersectionality’s formation provides a foundation and praxis to theorize and contribute to the dismantling of systemic oppressions. The whitening of intersectionality participates in commodification (Bilge 2015), in stark opposition to its original intentionality (Crenshaw 1991), and calls into question the plurality of feminism as if a hegemonic conceptualization of ‘feminism’ would be preferred, enhanced, or (en)forced.

States of Immersion: Bodies, Media Technologies

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:34pm
Philippe Bédard
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 15, 2021

Call for papers: States of Immersion: Bodies, Media Technologies 

Edited collection — Estimated publication 2023

Poetics of Infrastructure (NeMLA 2022)

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:34pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

NeMLA Annual Convention - Baltimore, MD - 10-13 March, 2022

Panel - Poetics of Infrastructure

National and Individual Memories in Spanish Urban Society and Landscapes

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:33pm
NeMLA 2022
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

This panel explores topographies of memory and architecture as a powerful force for cinematic storytelling, cityscapes’ psychosis, etc. As part of the special session, we are looking for contributions examining and analyzing diverse relationships between cinema, television, architecture, and memory and their links with contemporary Spanish media and identity. Submissions in English and Spanish, although we recommend the latter.Since Foucault conceptualized the notion of “heterotopy” as those ephemeral or stable places in relation to the parameters of exclusions of the dominant groups, the emergence of the internet and social media has further transformed traditional heterotopias.

Afterlives of Data

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:33pm
Media-N, Journal of the New Media Caucus
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 1, 2021

Current Open Call

Media-N, Journal of the New Media Caucus, invites submissions for a special themed issue:

Afterlives of Data

Guest Editors: Brian Michael Murphy (Bennington College) & Kris Paulsen (The Ohio State University)

https://iopn.library.illinois.edu/journals/median/information/authors

NeMLA (Baltimore, March 2022) "Race, Place, and Migration in Afro-Latinx Literature and Visual Art"

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:33pm
Nicole Bonino / University of Virginia
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Panel: Race, Place, and Migration in Afro-Latinx Literature and Visual Art 

This panel invites papers focused on the analysis of Afro-Latinx migratory dynamics as represented in Latin American art (films, plastic and visual art, live performances, and so on) and literature (such as novels, poems, plays, comics, visual poetry). Papers on the Caribbean, Centro America, South America, and Brazil are welcomed.  

Studying Trauma as a Part of Life and Understanding/Seeking Reconciliation

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:33pm
Rohini Chakraborty/NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Trauma when remains unresolved can end up causing more harm than one can imagine. Trauma can be caused by the most insignificant of incidents that happen in a person’s life. But how far have we come in understanding the trope of trauma? How do we talk about it with proper sensitivity? How much do we push before a past trauma breaks us again? In these trying times when solidarity and care are the only ways to make the world a more humane space to sustain within, how shall we treat the trauma of our loved ones and fellow human beings? How do we realize that the shame associated with trauma is but extreme societal conditioning? How do we unlearn the social stigma related to trauma? How does trauma force us to alter our memories as a defense mechanism?

Women and the Great War: New Critical Horizons

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:33pm
Richard Schumaker/NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Typically, scholarly reflection on the Great War focuses on military activity and masculine performance; in contrast, this NeMLA 2022 seminar examines the importance of women as fictional characters, authors, and purveyors of legacies associated with the Great War of 1914-1918. By privileging the role of women, it is hoped that we can bring a fresh critical light to this pivotal moment in world history.

 

The Literary Writer as Public Intellectual after 1945 (NeMLA 2022)

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:33pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Inviting abstract submissions for a panel on "The Literary Writer as Public Intellectual After 1945" at NeMLA's 53rd Annual Convention, to be held March 10-13, 2022 in Baltimore, Maryland

This panel examines the ways in which literary writers have adopted, subverted, or transformed the role of the public intellectual since 1945. Literary writers mattered to American public life during the mid-twentieth century in distinctive ways: that is, reading practices mattered to civic life (Matthews 2016, Menand 2010) and many novelists believed that the figurative or symbolic forms that they created could have a genuine impact on "more ostensibly 'real' political formations" (Szalay 2012).

Diasporic Blackness and Enactments of Care

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:32pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

This roundtable session addresses the 2022 NeMLA conference theme of “care” to explore its significance and resonance throughout the Black diaspora. As Christina Sharpe asks in In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (2016), “How can we think (and rethink and rethink) care laterally, in the register of the intramural, in a different relation than that of the violence of the state?” (20) This session aims to continue to rethink care in this context.

Presentations will consider how Black writers, artists, filmmakers, and other cultural producers explore the practice of care in relation to Black peoples and other living beings across national boundaries. Participants might consider, but are not limited to, some of the following questions:

How to Cope: Resilient Characters in 20th- and 21st-century Literature

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:32pm
Valerie Thiers-Thiam / 53rd Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

How does contemporary literature respond to and reimagine narratives of resilience? How can the concept of resilience be used to analyse characters in works of fiction?

Interrogating Vulnerable Subjectivities, Biopolitics, and the Ethics of Care in South Asia

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:32pm
Nidhi Shrivastava
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 30, 2021

In the last decade, we have witnessed the harrowing images of migrants including that of Alan Kurdi whose death sparked world-wide outrage at the way in which the migrant crisis has been dealt with on a global level. While Kurdi’s untimely death drew attention to the Syrian refugees and their plight, the political crisis that has taken place in the South Asian subcontinent begs us to further think about the subjectivities of migrants and refugees and the ethics of care within this region.

NeMLA2022 Roundtable: Intertextual Wilde

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:32pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Whether he parodied, plagiarized, appropriated, translated, borrowed, or critiqued, Oscar Wilde’s work contains a web of references that vigorously engages with the voices of others. The way Wilde spoke with and through his sources may reveal not only his own influences and allegiances, but also aspects of larger conversations within late Victorian culture involving artistic production, Decadence, theater, journalism, scholarship, poverty, gender issues, sexuality, prison reform, and more.

Iberian and Latin American Transatlantic Studies in the 19th to 21st Centuries

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:31pm
Sonia Zarco-Real
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

For the last twenty years, Iberian and Latin American Transatlantic Studies have challenged traditional academic notions of areas of study by examining the legacies of imperialism (colonialism and neocolonialism) on social constructs, knowledge, identity, disciplines, language, and societies from the 19th-21st centuries.

Women's Voices, Women's Lives: Female Identities in Contemporary German Context

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:31pm
Ph.D. Benedetta Bronzini/ Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 29, 2021

Although there appears to be a notable amount of literature discussing the topic of gender and media, the relation between gender, identity and their transposition in fiction remains a relevant aspect to be analyzed.

Migration, Belonging, and Afro-Europeanness: Current Articulations and Future Perspectives

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:15pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

This panel aims to explore how writers and filmmakers have articulated questions of Blackness and Europeanness, migration and cultural belonging, colonial histories and decolonial futures.

In recent decades, artists, scholars, and activists from all over Europe have interrogated and problematized wishful narratives about Europe as a democratic stronghold and a multicultural, borderless space. Working in different media, forms, and genres, these works address urgent questions, such as the racialization of migration, the persistent social and economic inequalities of urban spaces, and the legacies of repressed colonial histories.

Metatextuality in Contemporary French Caribbean Fiction

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:15pm
Julia Galmiche-Essue / University of Toronto
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Call for Papers - Session "Metatextuality in Contemporary French Caribbean Fiction" at the 53rd Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association (March 10-13, Baltimore, MD) 

This panel focuses on metatextual practices in contemporary French Caribbean fiction. Metatextuality here is understood as a form of intertextual discourse in which one text refers to itself or another text and critically reflects upon it. We welcome proposals that focus on the conditions of production, publication, distribution, circulation, consumption, transmission, and recognition (or lack thereof) of literary texts.

Preferred languages: French or English.

Deadline: September 30, 2021

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