cultural studies and historical approaches

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Thinking with a River: Housatonic Valley History and Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2022 - 11:24am
Jacob Remes and Sheila Liming
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, February 1, 2023

Thinking With a River: Housatonic Valley History and Culture
Edited by Sheila Liming and Jacob A.C. Remes

Abstracts due February 1, 2023

'Living fame no fortune can confound': Richard Barnfield's Legacy

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2022 - 11:23am
Sapienza University of Rome
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2022

“Living fame no fortune can confound”: Richard Barnfield’s Legacy
Sapienza University of Rome, 9-10 February 2023

Co-organized by:

Camilla Caporicci (University of Perugia)
Fabio Ciambella (Sapienza University of Rome)
Cristiano Ragni (University of Verona)

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Tania Demetriou (University of Cambridge)
Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex)

International Conference on Anglo-Portuguese Studies III: A Tribute to Professor Maria Leonor Machado de Sousa, OBE (1932-2021)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2022 - 11:21am
International Conference on Anglo-Portuguese Studies III, CDETAPS, Universidade Nova
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 15, 2022

International Conference onAnglo-Portuguese Studies III: a tribute to Professor Maria Leonor Machado de Sousa, OBE (1932-2021)

Venue: Faculdade de Ciências Sociais eHumanas
Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Campus de Campolide

Lisbon, Portugal, 24-26 November 2022

CETAPS (Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies) is pleased to announce its 3rd International ConferenceonAnglo-Portuguese Studies, a 3-day conference on topics related to Anglo-Portuguese historical, literary and cultural relations. We also welcome papers on Luso-American exchanges, Anglo-Iberian relations and papers that make comparisons and connections between Portuguese- speakingand Anglophone countries.

Affective Possibilities of Post/Decolonial Eco-literature

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2022 - 11:21am
Valerie Fryer-Davis
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2022

As more climate doomsday predictions continue to surface from scientists, journalists, and scholars, the fight to combat global climate collapse can sometimes feel hopeless—petrified by the saturation of negative affects in literary, theoretical, and cultural production. While continuing with neoliberal business-as-usual is untenable, scholars have begun to recognize that doom and gloom predictions alone actually make individuals less likely to act.

Chapters for The Poetics of Grief and Melancholy in East-West Conflicts and Reconciliations

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2022 - 11:20am
Dr Kelly Chan
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 9, 2022

Chapters for The Poetics of Grief and Melancholy in East-West Conflicts and Reconciliations

We are inviting chapter proposals for the edited book The Poetics of Grief and Melancholy in East-West Conflicts and Reconciliations. It is a collection of academic essays that examines the representation, aesthetics, dilemma and/or dichotomy of the notions of grief and melancholy in East-West exchanges and cultural dialogues. Contributors can explore the topic in the dimensions of individual behaviors under specific social norms and cultural products such as literature, film, music, art, theatre performance and any other forms of arts/genres etc.

Archives of the Planetary Mine: Culture, Nature Extraction, and Energy Across the Americas, 1900s-2000s

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2022 - 11:19am
Stockholm University / KTH, Royal Institute of Technology
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2022

With the turn towards extractivism and energy as objects for critical inquiry, minerals and fossil fuels have become crucial additions to categories of cultural, political, and materialist analyses. The international workshop Archives of the Planetary Mine will explore the intersections between culture, materiality, politics, energy consumption, and extractivism across the Americas, throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Its purpose is to address the geohistorical magnitudes of energy consumption and critical engagements with the logic of extraction as a condition of possibility for cultural production.

Genres of the Atlantic

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2022 - 11:08am
American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 3, 2022

In his seminal work, Poetics of Relation (1990), Édouard Glissant posited the term “commonplace” as a means to rethink the role of genre in a transatlantic frame. Taking as its object the "flood of convergences, publishing itself in the guise of the commonplace,” this formulation complicates any attempt to read genre as a closed system of inherited traits. Rather, the notion of the commonplace draws our attention to the unspoken norms that sustain literary communities across time and space. Positive in Glissant’s account, commonplaces have also worked to police the boundaries of what counts as literature and who is counted within its canons of literary value.

Asian Diaspora and Nation in Modern and Contemporary British Literature (CFP part of NeMLA)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2022 - 11:08am
NeMLA 2023
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2022

Is the UK a country of immigration? British immigration historian Panikos Panayi says yes. Although its history and founding are not comparable to that of the United States, which is synonymous with the history of immigration, the history of Britain is also not unrelated to immigration. On the contrary, for the past 200 years, immigration has been a major driving force in history, leading to significant changes in British society. In the context of the dissolution of the British Empire and the decline of the British economy after World War II, Englishness has emerged as a public concern by British people who ask themselves, “What is British?” or “What is English?”.

Moving in with Trauma (NeMLA 2023)

updated: 
Sunday, August 28, 2022 - 9:56am
Michelle Zheng/ NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2022

We have always lived with trauma, but how do we embrace trauma into our lives and create a meaningful life in the world we live in?

In recent years, critical considerations of aesthetics or beauty have been de-emphasized in literary criticism. There is a certain taboo about the notion of beauty, as Elaine Scarry has neatly pointed out: “many people have either actively advocated a taboo on beauty or passively omitted it from their vocabulary, even when thinking and writing about beautiful objects such as painting and poems” (117). There has been many talks about how aesthetics demeans a work’s values—serving as Bourgeois distractions from the real social issues we face, which rightfully remains as an important critical consideration.

NeMLA: Resilience and Resistance: Embracing Disability Narratives in 19th-century Fiction

updated: 
Thursday, August 25, 2022 - 5:57pm
NeMLA 2023 Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2022

Resilience and Resistance: Embracing Disability Narratives in Nineteenth-Century Fiction proposes a space for scholars to present research on disability studies and narrative agency in British fiction from the period. Disability studies is concerned with altering the contemporary political landscape to procure protections for disabled individuals and communities, question structures which uphold barriers to equal access, and challenge ideologies of ability that affirm ableist notions of social participation. Disability studies also challenges individuals and scholars to analyze the historical, literary, medical, and social understandings of disability to dismantle ableist structures.

Intersections of Crime and the Gothic

updated: 
Thursday, August 25, 2022 - 10:13am
Captivating Criminality 9
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 31, 2022

Deadline: 31 October 2022 Hybrid Conference: 2nd - 4th of March 2023 

Reminder -- Historical Fictions Research Network Online Conference (17 to 19 February 2023)

updated: 
Thursday, August 25, 2022 - 10:12am
Historical Fictions Research Network
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2022

Call for Papers
Historical Fictions Research Network Online Conference
(17 to 19 February 2023, Zoom)

The Historical Fictions Research Network (see https://historicalfictionsresearch.org/) aims to create a place for the discussion of all aspects of the construction of the historical narrative. The focus of the conference is the way we construct history, the narratives and fictions people assemble and how. We welcome both academic and practitioner presentations.

Representing a (Post)Pandemic World (1722-2022)

updated: 
Thursday, August 25, 2022 - 9:34am
University of Toronto Quarterly
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 7, 2022

Special Issue of University of Toronto Quarterly (Fall 2024)

Representing a (Post)Pandemic World (1722-2022)

This special issue of the University of Toronto Quarterly asks: What is the role of art in a (post)pandemic world? How do representations of a virus/pandemic bear witness to, diagnose, and remediate the (post)pandemic world? How do we define (post)pandemic writing and the arts throughout their long histories?  

Intersectionalities of the SWANA Bodies, Borders, Literatures

updated: 
Thursday, August 25, 2022 - 9:34am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2022

This panel invites interdisciplinary proposals that bring to attention the multiple, contradictory, and shifting approaches that encompass the studies of the Southwest Asia North Africa (SWANA) region. The overarching aim of this panel is to shed light on the theoretical and political significance of intersectionality for critical engagement with the SWANA region. We invite contributions examining how the relationalities of bodies, cultures, and cultural productions in the SWANA region and its diasporas shape discourses across nations, re(li)gions, and languages as they converge and diverge in their religious, racial, ethnic, and gender*sexuality-based identities.

CfP: Articles for The New Americanist

updated: 
Thursday, August 25, 2022 - 9:25am
The New Americanist (University of Warsaw)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2022

The New Americanist welcomes submissions to their upcoming issue which relates to American studies in any manner, and uses literary or cultural materials or activities as its points of reference. We especially welcome submissions by independent researchers, doctoral students, and early career academics.

The Uniform: Symbols of Power, Propaganda and Organisation in Popular Culture

updated: 
Thursday, August 25, 2022 - 9:22am
Popular Culture Research Network at the University of New England, Australia
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 31, 2023

PopCRN (UNE’s Popular Culture Research Network) hosting a virtual symposium exploring uniforms in popular culture to be held online on Thursday 20th April 2023.

This symposium aims to interrogate the ways that uniforms are used to in popular culture. We invite papers which examine uniforms of every type, from the formal to the informal, from military to sports and school uniforms. We welcome papers from researchers across the academic spectrum and encourage papers from postgraduate researchers and early career researchers. Presenters will have the opportunity to publish a refereed journal articles in a special symposium edition of Clothing Cultures.

Topics can include, but are not restricted to:

Cormac McCarthy Studies

updated: 
Thursday, August 25, 2022 - 9:21am
Southwest Popular/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 31, 2022

February 22-25, 2023

Albuquerque, NM

The Area Chair of the Cormac McCarthy Area of the SWPACA conference is seeking paper proposals on any aspect of the work of Cormac McCarthy, including novels, plays, and television and film scripts and adaptations.  We invite presentations about all facets of McCarthy’s work in forms ranging from critical essays to analyses employing recognized research methodologies. The chair also welcomes pre-formed panels, but will need submissions to be uploaded individually as required by the SWPACA. Paper presentations should be 15 minutes and should present an arguable thesis or develop a compelling question.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

Shaping Intellectual Disabilities in Early Modern Literature and Culture (CFP for edited volume)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 24, 2022 - 2:37am
Dr Alice Equestri (University of Padua)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, July 31, 2022

 

Editor: Dr Alice Equestri, University of Padua (alice.equestri@unipd.it)

Publisher: international academic press to be confirmed

Deadline for submitting chapter proposals (400 words): July 31, 2022
Notification of acceptance: September 1, 2022
Provisional deadline for essay submission (6000-8000 words): April 30, 2023

Papers are sought for a volume that critically examines – and advances our knowledge of – manifestations of intellectual disability in early modern English and European literature and culture (c. 1500-1700). The collection will be submitted to an international academic publisher.

Print: Theories, Histories, and Futures

updated: 
Tuesday, August 23, 2022 - 3:08pm
Comparative Literature, University of South Carolina
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 18, 2022

Print: Theories, Histories, and Futures

Comparative Literature Conference

February 23-25, 2023

University of South Carolina (Columbia)

“Disability’s Hidden Twin: Discourses of Care and Dependency in Literature”

updated: 
Tuesday, August 23, 2022 - 2:52pm
D. Christopher Gabbard
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 31, 2023

Call for abstracts for a volume of critical essays: “Disability’s Hidden Twin: Discourses of Care and Dependency in Literature”

Volume editors: Talia Schaffer (English, Graduate Center and Queens College, CUNY) and Chris Gabbard (English, Univ. of North Florida)

We are calling for abstracts for papers examining Anglophone imaginative literature (precluding memoirs) that engages in some fashion with care ethics and disability theory. We are seeking a range of representation from different eras and regions.

Modernist Jany Eyre?

updated: 
Tuesday, August 23, 2022 - 2:41pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2022

Coming to Charlotte Brontë's 1847 novel, Jane Eyre, for the first time, one may be struck by its apparently forward-looking elements, ones that do not seem to line up with expectations for early Victorian novels. In terms of the novel's explorations of inner consciousness, one observer finds that Jane Eyre is a precursor of modernist authors such as Proust, Woolf, and Joyce. Furthermore, Jane's keen awareness of women's equality with men in terms of the right to education, access to the wider world, and happiness in a relationship has distinctly feminist overtones. But may Jane Eyre be classified as a modernist and feminist work of literature?

Roles of First Nation Peoples in Modern Canadian Literary Works

updated: 
Tuesday, August 23, 2022 - 2:41pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2022

Modern Canadian poets and authors of fiction have incorporated aspects of First Nation cultures and characters in a range of works. In some cases portraits of First Nation individuals and communities are central to these literary works while in others they are less prominent. What are the similarities and differences between the depictions of First Nation peoples? Are the literary treatments of them reliable? What may we learn about Canadian historical and political realities in Canada, as well as gender roles, from these portrayals? Please submit 200-word abstracts through your new or previous user account by going to https://www.buffalo.edu/nemla.html and following the links.

Film Reviewer Needed

updated: 
Tuesday, August 23, 2022 - 2:39pm
Cinematic Codes Review
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 30, 2022

The Cinematic Codes Review is in need of a regular film reviewer(s). The reviewer has complete freedom to choose the films from past or present that they want to review. They can choose to do in-depth review essays that analyze one or two films seperately or comparatively, or six or so short surface reviews of a few films or series that they enjoyed watching. Reviews should be illustrated with screen-shots from the films you are describing. Non-regular scholarly essays from academics and articles about filmmaking from those inside the film industry are also warmy invited. CCR releases three issues per year, and a set of reviews is included in each issue. If more than one reviewer volunteers, reviewers can split the work.

Queer Temporalities and Nostalgias in Film and Television

updated: 
Tuesday, August 23, 2022 - 2:36pm
SCMS
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 28, 2022

We are trying to put together a panel proposal for the SCMS conference from April 12-15, 2023, in Denver. We are looking to supplement the papers we have already gathered with one or two more that deal with queer nostalgia/temporality in film/media. Please send an abstract of no more than 2500 characters and a bio (500 characters) to mstekl@stanford.edu and jennyme@stanford.edu

Reminder: BSA New Scholars Program deadline approaches...

updated: 
Tuesday, August 23, 2022 - 2:34pm
Bibliographical Society of America
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 3, 2022

As a reminder, the BSA New Scholars Program deadline is September 3. If you were contemplating applying, but haven’t yet, we strongly encourage you to do so!  CFA: BSA NEW SCHOLARS PROGRAM (DEADLINE SEPTEMBER 3) The Bibliographical Society of America’s New Scholars Program promotes the work of scholars new to bibliography, broadly defined to include the creation, production, publication, distribution, reception, transmission, and subsequent history of all textual artifacts.

Distinctively Caribbean Cultures and Characters

updated: 
Tuesday, August 23, 2022 - 2:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2022

Caribbean poets, dramatists, and novelists have created a complex portrait of the Islands' cultures and characters. Certainly many of these characters' and cultures' traits resonate with those in other areas of the world. But what are some of the distinctive characteristics of Caribbean life in literatures of the Caribbean? How do historical, political, or folkloric legacies help us understand these distinctive traits? What are the liberatory implications of distinctly Caribbean characters, communities, environments, and folkloric motifs? Please submit 200-word abstracts through your new or previous user account by going to https://www.buffalo.edu/nemla.html and following the links.

New Routledge Companion to Global Women's Writing

updated: 
Thursday, August 18, 2022 - 12:55pm
Ina Seethaler / Coastal Carolina University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 15, 2022

We invite abstracts for chapters of previously unpublished and original work to be included in the new Routledge Companion to Global Women’s Writing, which is under contract to be published in July 2024 as part of the Routledge Literature Companions series.

CFP: Rhetoric, Composition and Popular Culture Area of the PCA/ACA

updated: 
Thursday, August 18, 2022 - 12:53pm
Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 30, 2022

POPULAR CULTURE ASSOCIATION/AMERICAN CULTURE ASSOCIATION
2023 NATIONAL CONFERENCE

RHETORIC, COMPOSITION AND POPULAR CULTURE AREA
CALL FOR PROPOSALS: PAPERS OR PANELS

For information on the Popular Culture Association as well as complete and current conference details, see https://pcaaca.org/conference/2023

Resisting Extinction in Contemporary Italian Literature, Cinema & Media Studies

updated: 
Thursday, August 18, 2022 - 12:51pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2022

The environment is still being shaped by anthropocentric acts, facing continuous destruction, and reverberating catastrophic effects on numerous species, including humans both as individuals and as communities. This panel wants to contribute to the ongoing debate about the necessity to improve the human relationship with the environment, with nature, and the need for a significant, long overdue change of the current course of action. The ongoing unscrupulous devastation can lead to extreme outcomes such as extinction, announcing the termination of numerous representations of life in various forms. Yet, a strong resistance to this threat can be encountered in various contexts and is defined in disparate ways through diversified means of communication.

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