cultural studies and historical approaches

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Call for Abstracts: Contemporary Women Documentary Filmmakers in Latin America and Spain

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:56pm
NeMLA 2022
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 9, 2021

There are multiple reasons behind the recent eruption of female directors within the documentary field, such as the fact that it is a field in which major resources or connections aren’t needed in order to succeed. However, the thriving of women documentary filmmakers may also respond to reasons of a more formal nature. As feminist film theorists have argued, driven by its lack of faith in the visual archive, the female gaze tends to push traditional image and narrative boundaries in order to open up the door to memories, experiences, and forms of cultural knowledge encoded in senses other than (and questioning of) the visual and/or auditory.

Music in Literature, NeMLA, March 10-13, 2022

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:55pm
Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

This interdisciplinary panel examines the rich relationship of music and literary texts in various world literatures focusing primarily on the 20th century, but presentations within a broader time frame will also be considered. We invite a wide range of papers investigating the author’s technique of representing music in literature, examining aesthetic, historical, and cultural interactions between music and literature, audience and performers, literary text and composer.

Dostoevsky and World Literatures, NeMLA, March 10-13, 2022

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:55pm
Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

This panel examines Dostoevsky’s influence on 19th-century to contemporary authors and studies possible connections and textual echoes between Dostoevsky’s writings and other texts potentially related to his literary legacy. We invite abstracts devoted to the contemporary literary analysis of the chosen texts, as well as broader research on philosophical or theological issues central to Dostoevsky’s worldview and that continue to be discussed and re-examined today.

NeMLA 2022: In/From the Wake: Decolonial Witnessing

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:55pm
Amanda González Izquierdo
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

In her seminal work In the Wake: On Blackness and Being, Christina Sharpe writes: “I’ve been trying to articulate a method of encountering a past that is not past. A method along the lines of a sitting with, a gathering, and a tracking of phenomena that disproportionately and devastatingly affect Black peoples any and everywhere we are.” She calls this methodology “living in the wake” of slavery and its afterlives. This panel invites papers that think in and from the wake to propose new methods to bear witness to trauma particular to othered, oppressed people. How can we establish a restorative witnessing, one which is imaginative, hauntological, and apocalyptic?

Suicide and Popular Culture

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:55pm
Dr. Mike Alvarez/University of New Hampshire
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 15, 2021

According to the World Health Organization, more than 700,000 people die by suicide every year; one in 100 global deaths is by suicide. In the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported 45,000 deaths by suicide (14.2 per 100,000) for the year 2020, representing a 30 percent increase over a 20-year period. Suicide is the eleventh leading cause of death in the U.S., and among persons between the ages of 10 to 34, it is the second leading cause. Women are more likely than men to attempt suicide, but men are three to four times more likely than women to die by suicide. In short, suicide is an intractable public and global health issue that has shown few signs of abating.

Germany and the African Diaspora

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
Northeast Modern Languages Association annual convention
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Why Germany? What relation does Germany, a country, have with the African continent? The relationship between African countries and Germany dates back to the seventeenth century, long before the Berlin conference of 1884 under Otto von Bismarck—itself a historical turning-point in German colonial politics. The meeting resulted in the scramble for and partition of Africa by European nations like France, Germany, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain. The nineteenth-century saw an explosion of adventurous trading enterprises that pushed Bismarck to start a more official, state-supported form of colonialism and ultimately to the Berlin Conference.

NeMLA 2022 - Living Urban Ruins in Contemporary Latin American Literature, Film, and Media

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
Alexander Tough / University of Pittsburgh
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

The climate crisis, the economic crisis, the refugee crisis, and the COVID-19 pandemic has called to the forefront the experience of contemporary beings which forces us to re-evaluate the place of the human in the current world, calling into question the crisis of the universal mode of man and human exceptionalism. Such a displacement in how we think about the human experience also forces us to re-think the city as a whole and what it wants to forget, in particular urban ruins. Is it still beneficial to think of urban ruins as dead, as just relics of a bygone age of national development, or just as modern flops that merge with the surrounding urban fabric? Or are they alive?

NeMLA 2022- Forgotten Genocides

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

The tern Genocide was coined by Raphael Lemkin in 1944, in a context heavily influenced by the events of the Jewish Holocaust. The parameters of Genocide, and its legal consequences were gathered in the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide that recognizes that the following are factors that take place in a genocide:

-Killing members of the group

-Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group

-Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring physical destruction in whole or in part

-Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group

-Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group

International Bilingual Webinar on Tribal Lifestyle: Literature-Culture-Anthropology-Linguistics (IBWTL-2)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
International Bilingual Journal of Culture, Anthropology and Linguistics (IBJCAL), eISSN: 2582-4716
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 30, 2021

Call for Papers (CfP) to the আন্তর্জাতিক দ্বিভাষিক ওয়েবিনার আদিবাসী জীবনযাত্রা : সাহিত্য-সংস্কৃতি-নৃবিজ্ঞান-ভাষাবিজ্ঞান/ International Bilingual Webinar on Tribal Lifestyle: Literature-Culture-Anthropology-Linguistics (IBWTL-2)

Scholarly Paper Presentation Registration link:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe9-ZmECYPxIsO067_v89hMUyoCYRvY...

Senses in the City (Panel)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
Arianna Fognani
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Dear Colleagues,

please consider submitting an abstract to the following roundtable at the NeMLA's 53rd annual convention in Baltimore, MD (U.S.) from March 10 to 13, 2022.

FORMAT: Panel. 3-4 participants, reading a formal paper of 15-20 minutes (2500-3000 words) as set by the chair, followed by Q&A.

Call for Contributions: Design in Chaos the New Beginning: Fashion, Style, Design, Brands & Consumer Culture

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:44pm
Intellect Books
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, March 1, 2022

In the past few years, we have seen a revision of historicism with events that include racial and social reckoning, the removal of perceived racially oppressive brands, body size inclusivity, unprecedented global pandemic loss of life, multiple global shutdowns, falsely contested elections, large scale falsehoods orchestrated through social media, and a general individualization of experience. New ways of living have emerged that include the wearing of face coverings, shopping online, curb and home delivery, new styles of clothing that are worn, more engagement with computers and social media, concerns of global warming, the race into outer-space, global vaccination, and governmental control.

Boccaccio and Petrarch in the Wake of Plague

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:44pm
Italians and Italianists at Kalamazoo, ICMS Kalamazoo
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Call for Papers
2022 International Congress of Medieval Studies (Kalamazoo)

May 9-14, 2022 – *online*

 

Panel Title: Boccaccio and Petrarch in the Wake of Plague

 

Contact: Alani Hicks-Bartlett, alani_hicks-bartlett@brown.edu

Principal Sponsoring Organization: Italians and Italianists at Kalamazoo

 

Victorians Institute Journal Call for Submissions

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:43pm
Victorians Institute Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 1, 2021

The Victorians Institute Journal is pleased to announce its new partnership with Penn State University Press.  We welcome submissions that contribute to any aspect of Victorian and Edwardian literary and cultural studies.

To submit a manuscript, please visit http://www.editorialmanager.com/vij   

For all other queries, please contact the editors at vij@mtsu.edu

Call for Papers

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:43pm
Mmi Journals
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 15, 2021

The journal of arts and social sciences has open call for papers. Publication of the August Issue of Volume 4 of the journal is ongoing. 

Important information about the journal can be found in its homepage. Though relatively new, the journal has been publishing scopus 5 articles minimum per year requirement and above since its launch in 2018. Most of the authors are eminent scholars in the disciplines of arts and social science.

Call for Papers (Edited Collection): Teaching with Fairy Tales

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:08pm
Heather Powers
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 15, 2021

Call for Papers (Edited Collection): Teaching with Fairy Tales

 

Teaching with Fairy Tales is a collection of essays that discuss the many ways to use fairy tales and folklore in classrooms at all levels. We are soliciting contributions of chapters focusing on classroom uses for fairy tales and/or folklore in any field. While lessons for any level of education are welcome, activities that can be adapted to more than one age group are preferred. 

Essays should be 6,000-8,000 words, MLA format. Priority will be given to submissions that have not been published elsewhere.

This peer-reviewed, edited collection will be published by McFarland (expected publication 2023). 

Reminder - Historical Fictions Research Network Online Conference (19-20 February 2022)

updated: 
Monday, August 30, 2021 - 10:46am
Historical Fictions Research Network
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021

Call for Papers
Historical Fictions Research Network Online Conference (19-20 February 2022)

The Historical Fictions Research Network aims to create a place for the discussion of all aspects of the construction of the historical narrative. The focus of the conference is the way we construct history, the narratives and fictions people assemble and how. We welcome both academic and practitioner presentations.

CALL FOR PAPERS for New Literaria International e-Conference on Contemporary Trends and Development in Cultural Studies and the Humanities

updated: 
Sunday, August 29, 2021 - 3:19am
New Literaria
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 15, 2021

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PANEL PROPOSALS

2nd International e-Conference

“Contemporary Trends and Development in Cultural Studies and the Humanities”

Date: 22nd, 23rd, and 24th October, 2021

To be Organized by

New Literaria- An International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities

In collaboration with

Department of History, Humanities and Society, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy & Department of English, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur, India

 

Concept Note

Obscenity! Blasphemy! Treason! An Interdisciplinary Conference on Censorship

updated: 
Saturday, August 28, 2021 - 5:52am
Dr L. Acadia / National Taiwan University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 7, 2021

Obscenity! Blasphemy! Treason!

An Interdisciplinary International Conference on Censorship

 

March 3–4, 2022 at NTU and online

Keynote: Ramona Naddaff (UC Berkeley)

 

53rd NeMLA Convention - Panel: Women's Voices, Women's Lives: Female Identities in Contemporary German Context

updated: 
Friday, August 27, 2021 - 3:39am
Ph.D. Benedetta Bronzini/ Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

53rd NeMLA Convention

10-13 March 2022, Baltimore, MD

 

Although there appears to be a notable amount of literature discussing the topic of gender and media, the relation between gender, identity and their transposition in fiction remains a relevant aspect to be analyzed.

Du Bois's Reconstruction of Language (C19 2022)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 24, 2021 - 10:29am
Thomas W. Howard
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 10, 2021

Writing about the reception of his essay collection The Souls of Black Folk (1904), W. E. B. Du Bois describes the text as a simultaneous mixture of clear messages and irreconcilable ambiguity. “A clear central message it has conveyed to most readers,” he claims, “but around this center there has lain a penumbra of vagueness and half-veiled allusion.” The difficulty, Du Bois suggests, comes from Souls’s attempt to reconstruct affect into language: “to translate the finer feelings of men into words.” Scholars frequently identify these fragments of affect and vagueness as part of Du Bois’s poetic style.

American Writers in Paris: Then and Now

updated: 
Monday, August 23, 2021 - 5:19pm
Ferdâ Asya
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

I am inviting original essays on the literary works written by American writers, who have lived in Paris from the 1800s to the present, for a book tentatively titled American Writers in Paris: Then and Now.

Although American expatriate literature in Paris is typified by the Lost Generation or the Jazz Age of the 1920s, Americans show a distinct presence in Paris from Jefferson to the Jazz Age and from the Jazz Age to the present. Lifting social repressions, liberating artistic expressions, alleviating psychological ailments, inspiring artistic creations, enriching personal experiences, or enhancing economic standards at different times of history, Paris has turned out to be an alternative abode to live and write for American writers.

PANDEMIC!: COVID-19 and Literary Studies

updated: 
Sunday, August 22, 2021 - 10:03pm
English Language Notes
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 1, 2021

Call for papers for Special Issue of English Language Notes

Pandemic!:  COVID-19 and Literary Studies

61.1 (April 2023)

Jason Gladstone, Nan Goodman, Karim Mattar, co-editors

University of Colorado Boulder

 

 

NeMLA 2022 - “Resonating Voices: 17th- and 18th-century French Writers” (Panel)

updated: 
Friday, August 20, 2021 - 4:26pm
Dr. Stéphane Natan, Professor of French, Rider University / 53rd Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention, Baltimore, MD - March 10-13, 2022
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

This panel focuses on uncovering ideas and philosophies proposed by 17th- and 18th-century French writers to criticize, change, or improve their world. We discuss their thoughts, beliefs, and value systems in light of the reality of their time. 17th- and 18th-century authors can include female and male philosophers, moralists, essayists, poets, novelists, and playwrights. Method of analysis is open.

Submit abstracts (300 words maximum) by September 30, 2021, to Session ID # 19144

Abstracts must be submitted through NeMLA's website: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/19144

Extended Call: Mythological Equines in Film

updated: 
Friday, August 20, 2021 - 2:26pm
St. Thomas University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

I have 12 great essays for a volume called Mythological Equines in Film (Series: Equine Creations: Imagining Horses in Literature and Film), which is meant to be paired with Mythological Equines in Children’s Literature (Series: Equine Creations: Imagining Horses in Literature and Film), which is full with 21 essays.

In order to keep them approximately the same size, I am looking for 2-3 more essays to round out the film collection. Harry Potter and Narnia are well covered, but other topics are open.

The abstract deadline is Sept. 30, 2021. The deadline for essays will be February 1, 2022.

How to submit your proposal

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