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cultural studies and historical approaches

'Tropical Gothic'

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:32am
eTropic journal
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 30, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS special issue ‘Tropical Gothic’

 

Submission Deadline: 30 December 2018

 

‘TROPICAL GOTHIC’

‘The Gothic’ is undergoing a resurgence in academic and popular cultures. Propelled by fears produced by globalization, the neoliberal order, networked technologies, post-truth and environmental uncertainty – tropes of ‘the gothic’ resonate. The gothic allows us to delve into the unknown. It calls up unspoken truths and secret desires.

Reading Reality through Science Fiction

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:33am
University Stefan cel Mare of Suceava, 13 University Street, 720229 Suceava, Romania
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 1, 2019

Reading Reality through Science Fiction

The academic journal Messages, Sages and Ages (http://www.msa.usv.ro/), based at the English Department, University of Suceava, Romania, invites contributions for an issue on “science fiction as reality-check”; the theme issue is guest edited by Roberto Paura (University of Perugia, Italy).

Tourists, Tourism, and Transnationality in the Victorian Cultural Imagination

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:37am
Joellen Masters/Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Travel, travel writing, and the rise of mass tourism in the nineteenth century have received an impressively wide scholarly focus. In informing the willing sightseer, guidebooks like Baedeker’s or Murray’s constructed a particular approach to the foreign and the unknown. Obligatory rather than spontaneous, requisite rather than discretionary, the experience guidebooks delineated and that powerful tourist agencies like Thomas Cook regulated, produced an intrepid British traveler whose thirst for the new and the exotic challenged conventional notions of relaxation and knowledge, while, at the same time, remained a carefully governed cosmopolitan identity.

NeMLA 2019-Intersecting Classes, Races, and Women in American Literature

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:37am
Hediye Ozkan
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

In her groundbreaking book titled Women in the Nineteenth Century, Margaret Fuller suggests a remedy for the degradation of work for women stating, “Women are the best helpers of one another” (117). Fuller’s statement has reflections in many works written at the end of the nineteenth century such as Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, The Silent Partner (1871),  Alcott’s Work (18739, and Blake’s Fettered for Life (1874) all of which focus on sisterhood, solidarity, and feminine bond among women across class, race, and nationality as a survival mechanism within capitalist economy.

The Haitian Revolution in the Transatlantic Literary Imagination, NeMLA

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:38am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

A growing body of recent scholarship argues that the Haitian Revolution is one of the defining events of modernity. But from 1791 until 1804, the fog of war distorted and obscured Western perceptions of Haiti. From independence until official recognition by France in 1825, isolation did likewise. Fear, mythmaking, and bigotry filled the void. In Tropics of Haiti, Marlene Daut states that “[a] great portion of the texts within the transatlantic print culture of the Haitian Revolution reveal themselves, upon closer examination, to be unsure about what they ‘think’ they are: novels or memoirs, histories or dramatizations… [they] blur the lines between history and fiction, biography and memoir, philosophy and science”.

Everything Old Is New Again: Adapting the Classics in Contemporary Young Adult Novels

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:39am
Drs. Dana Lawrence and Amy L. Montz
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 1, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

Everything Old Is New Again:

Adapting the Classics in Contemporary Young Adult Novels

“An adaptation is not vampiric: it does not draw the life-blood from its source and leave it dying or dead, nor is it paler than the adapted work. It may, on the contrary, keep that prior work alive, giving it an afterlife it would never have had otherwise” (Linda Hutcheon, A Theory of Adaptation, 2006).

History, Identity and Emotions in Italian Literature

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:39am
NeMLA 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

In the last decades, the general perception that emotions are opposed to history and that politics is unemotional has been challenged by a number of scholars in various disciplines: Sara Ahmed’s, for example, has argued that emotions ‘stick’ to objects in a social context, while others consider affect as a fundamental aspect of citizenship (among them, Graziella Parati). This panel seeks to continue a conversation started at NeMLA 2018 about the role and representation of emotions and affect in Italian history and literature. We will accept proposals that analyze the intersectionality between history, identity and emotions from early modern to contemporary Italian literary texts.

(Kalamazoo 2019) Returning and Not Returning from War: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Loss of Self and Others in Medieval Depictions of Conflict

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:50am
Stefanie Goyette, Société Rencesvals, American-Canadian Branch
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

Warriors in medieval epic and chivalric romance often seem to return whole from battle even if they lose body parts or family members. They grieve deeply and vocally on the battlefield and then return to their homes or cities, seemingly ready to continue battle in the name of lost kin. Charlemagne is devastated by pain over Roland’s death in Roncevaux, demonstrated with tears and swooning. Others, like William “Short-Nose” of Orange, become famous for their lost parts, which, in absence, may even become emblematic of such warrior heroes. But do these warriors exhibit symptoms of trauma stemming from their constant exposure to violence?

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