ecocriticism and environmental studies

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Poetry's Publics and Counterpublics

updated: 
Wednesday, October 28, 2020 - 1:23pm
ACLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

This panel invites discussion on how poets have negotiated the construction of publics and counterpublics in our loosely defined contemporary moment. While writers have long been interested in the genre’s ability to foment and critique the production of virtual and actual modes of togetherness, we aim to address poetry’s engagements with collectivity after the rise of mass media and the opening up of political and aesthetic representation to diverse identities and electorates that defined the postwar period in the United States. What kinds of social bodies can texts and politics produce in this realm? What does the study of poetry reveal about historical shifts in the ways collectivity gets experienced and conceptualized?

Dark Economies: Anxious Futures, Fearful Pasts Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, October 28, 2020 - 1:14pm
Falmouth University, UK 7 - 9 July 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 1, 2021

After the success of the Folk Horror in the Twenty First Century conference hosted by Falmouth University, we are holding another related conference in 2021.

 

We are aiming to have a face to face conference at the beautiful Falmouth Campus in Cornwall. With sub-tropical gardens and the beach nearby, there will be a ‘Welcome to Dark Falmouth’ cemetery walk above the lovely Swanpool lake, an art exhibition, a gig and street food in place of the more usual staid conference dinner. If we’re going to beat Covid we want to do it in style!*

 

ACLA 2021: Repurposing Enlightenment

updated: 
Wednesday, October 28, 2020 - 1:12pm
ACLA Seminar
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

The Enlightenment has long been understood as a break from past practices and traditions, as a period in which reason, science, progress, secularization were invented. Instead, we seek to understand the Enlightenment and the values identified with it not as rejections of the past or sudden revolutions in thought, but as reconsiderations of earlier ways of knowing. These instances of repurposing include both translations of older sources and traditional thought practices into new contexts as well as the proliferation, amplification, and replication of eighteenth-century ideas.

Remainder from Epistemology: Exploring the Discursive Possibilities of Aporia

updated: 
Monday, October 26, 2020 - 1:41pm
Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies (LLIDS)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 15, 2020

Remainder from Epistemology: Exploring the Discursive Possibilities of Aporia

Man has not been able to describe himself as a configuration in the episteme without thought at the same time discovering, both in itself and outside itself, at the borders yet also in its very warp and woof, an element of darkness, an apparently inert density in which it is embedded, an unthought which it contains entirely, yet in which it is also caught.

– Michel Foucault

Post Green: Literature, Culture, and Environment

updated: 
Friday, October 23, 2020 - 1:31pm
Dr. Animesh Roy
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 15, 2021

CALL FOR PAPERS

Post Green: Literature, Culture, and Environment

Edited by Murali Sivaramakrishnan and Animesh Roy

 

Concept Note:

Economies of Entitlement and Complicity [ACLA 2021]

updated: 
Wednesday, October 21, 2020 - 12:20pm
Anirban Gupta-Nigam | UC Humanities Research Institute; Rebecca Saunders | Illinois State University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

This seminar for the 2021 annual conference of the American Comparative Literature Association investigates the intersections and divergences among literary, sociocultural, and political-economic species of entitlement and the mechanisms of complicity that perpetuate them. It examines intertwined modes of domination and exploitation including, but not limited to: 

-overtly predatory forms of droit du seigneur; Sadean (and sadistic) forms of aristocratic sexual predation; white supremacist and toxic masculinities; systems of slavery and servitude; and the “pornotropological” rhetorics and practices (identified by Hortense Spillers) that pathologize black and brown bodies; and

Fictions of Employment: The Image of Business in Contemporary Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, October 21, 2020 - 12:20pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 29, 2020

This seminar explores the image of business and the business person/persona in contemporary literature from a wide variety of theoretical and disciplinary approaches. Open to all geographical contexts, with focus on texts dating 1971-onwards. Particular interest and enthusiasm for submissions grounded in women and BIPOC representation in business settings, neoliberal policy and political ideology, mental health, and climate change. Contact: rmarnane@bryant.edu

ACLA seminar: South Asian Disasters in 20th and 21st Century Literature, Film, and Culture

updated: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 10:03am
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

South Asian Disasters in 20th and 21st Century Literature, Film, and Culture: 

a seminar at the American Comparative Literature Association meeting on April 8-11, 2021.

Co-organized by Liam O'Loughlin (Capital University) and Pallavi Rastogi (Louisiana State University)

Call for book chapters on Marguerite Henry's King of the Wind

updated: 
Saturday, October 17, 2020 - 11:10am
Northwestern State University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 30, 2020

I invite chapter proposals on Marguerite Henry’s Newbery-winning novel King of the Wind for the first in a series of edited collections about Henry’s individual works, edited by Rachel L. Carazo (Northwestern State University).

All areas of study, with a common goal of representing the cultural, social, philosophical, and material significance of King of the Wind are invited to participate.

While writing my graduate thesis, “Conflicting Views of Culture and Power: The Arab World in Marguerite Henry’s King of the Wind”, Dawn Heinecken also published an article about the absence of scholarship on Henry’s works. These proposed collections therefore seek to increase the scholarship available about Marguerite Henry.

Contagions and Non-Human Animals: (Re)Viewing Disregarded Species in Real and Imagined Pandemics

updated: 
Saturday, October 17, 2020 - 11:08am
St. Thomas University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Contagions and Non-Human Animals: (Re)Viewing Disregarded Species in Real and Imagined Pandemics

The impact of COVID-19 and the threat that it poses to future human experiences has been well-documented in news reports during the past few months. However, now that non-human animals are possible carriers and becoming infected, their experiences, while often overlooked, are nevertheless integrated into the worldwide pandemic.

Thus, this collection seeks to balance essays about non-human animals during real-world pandemics, such as the COVID-19 one, with those of their experiences during literary or cinematic ones. The scope of this call for papers is broad and can include topics such as:

Realism and its Antinomies: Climate Change Edition (ACLA 2021)

updated: 
Friday, October 16, 2020 - 1:46pm
Rebecca Oh, University of Illinois
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

The representational challenges of climate change, unending environmental disaster, and the Anthropocene have spurred lively debates about realism, its uses or limits, and its antinomies. This seminar seeks to create an opportunity for a comparative aesthetics of realism, and to think deeply about realism and its antinomies in relation to climate change.

The End Times: Approaches to the Apocalypse ESA Conference 2021 CFP

updated: 
Friday, October 16, 2020 - 11:12am
English Student Association at The Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2020

What: English Student Association Conference

Where: ONLINE (hosted through The Graduate Center, CUNY).

When: 12 March 2021

 

Abstract deadline: December 1st

Registration deadline: February 12th (*registration will be free)

 

Please submit all abstracts through the following Google Form: https://forms.gle/srZJ4Wn7YBpaYnHW8

The Nonhuman in American Literary Naturalism

updated: 
Friday, October 16, 2020 - 10:57am
Kenneth K Brandt and Karin M Danielsson
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 8, 2021

Call for proposals

The Nonhuman in American Literary Naturalism

Editors: Kenneth K Brandt and Karin M Danielsson

The Material Turn in Comparative Literature (ACLA 2021)

updated: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 1:53pm
Oliver Aas (Cornell University)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

What does "materiality" mean for the study of literature, culture, and the environment today? Should we replace “outdated” theoretical models (i.e. Marxist materialism) with newer ones or is it possible to establish a productive dialogue between seemingly disparate generations or paradigms of thought?

Last Call: Submission for "Opening the Ecological Text" Sepcial Issue

updated: 
Friday, October 2, 2020 - 11:44am
Anne McConnell, West Virginia State University; Kent Shaw, Wheaton College
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 1, 2020

Please consider submitting a manuscript for our special issue, Opening the Ecological Text, in the peer-reviewed, open-access journal, Humanities.  Here is the call for papers and the link where you can submit:

Rabindranath Tagore and his Creative Genius (ACLA 2021, virtual conference)

updated: 
Friday, October 2, 2020 - 11:43am
Medha Bhattacharyya, PhD, Bengal Institute of Technology, India
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, October 28, 2020

American Comparative Literature Association Annual Conference 8-11 April 2021

 

Rabindranath Tagore was the first Nobel Laureate of Asia. He was a multi-talented genius. He experimented in several fields of creativity namely, song, dance, poetry, dramas, short stories, novels, novellas, essays, education, painting and social reformation to name a few. Even after 150 years of his birth, how or why does humankind across the globe still find Tagore universally relevant? This panel aims to explore these diverse facets of Rabindranath Tagore as perceived from a contemporary perspective. The panel welcomes papers which examines Tagore’s works in comparison to other practitioners, either his contemporaries or in contemporary society.

Stories from the Margins: Indigenous Connections to the Land

updated: 
Friday, October 2, 2020 - 11:40am
Francesca Mussi/ University of Northumbria
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 11, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Stories from the Margins: Indigenous Connections to the Land

 

University of Northumbria 29-30 June 2021

 

 

Confirmed Keynote Speakers

 

  • Prof. Lill Tove Fredriksen (UiT The Arctic University of Norway)
  • Conversation between Prof. David Stirrup (University of Kent, U.K.) and Anishinaabe, Métis and settler-Irish artist Elizabeth LaPensee

 

Embodied Environmental Risk in Technical Communication: Local and Global Contexts

updated: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020 - 1:29pm
Samuel Stinson and Mary Le Rouge
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 15, 2020

Request for Chapters

Embodied Environmental Risk in Technical Communication: Local and Global Contexts

Deadline for Proposal Submissions: October 15, 2020.

  

We invite chapter proposals from both scholars and practitioners of environmental and disaster risk communication for an edited collection which the ATTW Book Series Editor, Tharon Howard, has invited us to submit for consideration for the research line of the ATTW Book Series in Technical and Professional Communication

CFP: Leaky Ontologies - ACLA 2021 Virtual Seminar

updated: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020 - 10:00pm
Pedro Lopes de Almeida
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

“Stuff leaks through such that the real manifests not just as gaps and inconsistencies in reality.” 
                                                                                   Tim Morton, Humankind  

Call for Research Articles and Creative Writings - The Contour (ISSN 2349-6398)-An International Peer-Reviewed Online Journal Of Studies In English | ESTD 2014

updated: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020 - 1:45pm
The Contour (ISSN 2349-6398)- An International Peer-Reviewed Online Journal Of Studies In English | ESTD 2014
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

Recently we all must have noticed that there had been numerous memes doing rounds on social media platforms acknowledging, albeit in sarcastic ways, the role of the Covid-19 virus in teaching mankind some of the most-neglected values of life heretofore.  Such cultural texts with their nuanced sub-texts have been rapidly gaining access to our lives and activities as the subsidiary effects of this present pandemic situation. However, the pandemic is not something new to human civilization. There are references galore in various literary and non-literary texts of its sweeping destructive force before. But this present threat from Covid-19 seems to be a kind of a shock to the anthropocentric worldview.

(NeMLA 2021 panel) Laughing Off Violence: The Genre of Comedy and its Politics

updated: 
Tuesday, September 29, 2020 - 10:16pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 10, 2020

We invite presentation proposals for the 2021 NeMLA Annual Conference, to be held virtually Mach 11-14.  

The current COVID-19 pandemic highlights the relationship between disaster, racism, and comedy in unexpected ways. Fear, hostility, and open acts of violence towards Asian bodies, the perceived carriers of disease, are naturalized in part through their exaggerated and comic portrayals. The images of Oriental “gross” food consumers in Hazmat suits and masks circulate via internet memes and anecdotes of personal encounters, generating a shared normal response of derision and repulsion. What is so funny, though? 

Narrating Violence and Environments in Latin America (NeMLA 2021 Panel)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 29, 2020 - 8:33pm
Kevin Ennis / Brown University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 11, 2020

In After Nature: A Politics for the Anthropocene (2015), Jedediah Purdy describes what he calls the "environmental imagination," which comprises “how we see and how we learn to see, how we suppose the world works, how we suppose that it matters, and what we feel we have at stake in it. It is an implicit, everyday metaphysics, the bold speculations buried in our ordinary lives” (6-7). Amidst the gravity of the Anthropocene today, Purdy examines the linkages between environmental imagination and “ways of acting, personally, politically, and legally, that have shaped the world in concrete ways” (7).

Pandemics & Epidemics in Cultural Representation (Edited volume)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 29, 2020 - 1:25am
Editors: Sathyaraj Venkatesan, Antara Chatterjee, Brian Callender, A. David Lewis
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 15, 2020

Concept Note:

‘The interactions that make us sick also constitute us as a community. Disease emergence dramatizes the dilemma that inspires the most basic of human narratives: the necessity and danger of human contact’ (Priscilla Wald, 2008, p. 2).

 

Naturalistic Models of Society and the Novel Form

updated: 
Monday, September 28, 2020 - 2:41pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 11, 2020

Abstract This panel will seek to explore the changing relationship between scientific paradigms and society’s self-understanding as it is manifest in the novel form. If the novel itself has functioned as a record of the social imagination—a narrative ideologeme as Jameson describes it – this social imagination often borrowed its models from contemporary natural philosophy and later the social sciences. We see examples of this in Balzac’s use of taxonomical zoology, Sterne’s use of Cartesian “animal spirits,” or Joyce’s phylogenetic process in “Oxen of the Sun.” Some of the questions this panel will ask include: how do naturalistic sociological models help to mediate political and aesthetic theories? How do these models affect stylistic developments?

Disasters, Apocalypses, and Catastrophes (Ficociello and Bell)

updated: 
Monday, September 28, 2020 - 2:23pm
Popular Culture Association (PCA) National Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 1, 2020
  • PCA/ACA National conference meeting location and dates

Popular Culture Association (PCA) National Conference

March 31-April 3, 2021

Boston, MA

 

Need additional chapters for “Posthuman Animals"

updated: 
Monday, September 28, 2020 - 2:19pm
Dr. Krishanu Maiti
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 15, 2020

Need additional chapters for “Posthuman Animals" ***deadline for abstract:September 30, 2020    

Need additional chapters on

“Posthuman Animals: Readings in Literary and Cultural Texts”

***If interested, send us an email ASAP.

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