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eighteenth century

Displacement in texts of the long eighteenth century (1660-1815)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 26, 2019 - 1:24pm
Cynthia Klekar-Cunningham and Linda Zionkowski
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 1, 2019

This peer-reviewed volume will discuss the focus on displacement, both external and internal, in texts of the long eighteenth century (1660-1815). 

External displacement can be considered as an individual’s or a population’s forced/coerced transfer from a particular location due to war or political conflicts, land development, natural disaster, economic opportunities/exploitations, or the redrawing of national boundaries. Such displacement might include

Loose Dresses, Loose Women: Pedagogies of Harlots and Whores from Hogarth to the Haus of Gaga (NeMLA panel)

updated: 
Friday, June 14, 2019 - 1:26pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Loose Dresses, Loose Women:nPedagogies of Harlots and Whores from Hogarth to the Haus of Gaga

Chairs Tommy Mayberry (Office of Teaching and Learning, University of Guelph) and Debra Bourdeau (College of Arts and Sciences, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University-Worldwide)

Race, Biopolitics and the Genres of the Human

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:10pm
Northeast Modern Language Association 51st Annual Convention
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Race, Biopolitics and the Genres of the Human

Northeast Modern Language Association 51st Annual Convention, March 5-8, 2020

Chair: Nazia Manzoor, University at Albany, SUNY (nmanzoor@albany.edu)

 

NeMLA: French Religious Spaces, Rhetoric, and Identity: 1534-1790

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:39pm
Janée Allsman, University of Colorado Boulder
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

NeMLA 51st Annual Convention, March 5-8, 2020

Boston, Massachusetts
Marriott Copley Place

http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

 

French Religious Spaces, Rhetoric, and Identity: 1534-1790

 

How did religious spaces and their regulation in France between 1534 and 1790 shape religious rhetoric and identities? How did the legacies or privation of these spaces inform or define the identities of French missionaries in the colonies, or of French-speaking religious communities in exile? What was the relationship between private and public spaces and religious identities?

Suggested topics may include:

Colonial Knowledges: Environment and Logistics in the Creation of Knowledge in British Colonies from 1750 to 1950

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:17am
Charlotte Coull/Tina Janssen
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 23, 2019

Colonial Knowledges: Environment and Logistics in the Creation of Knowledge in British Colonies from 1750 to 1950.

27th-28th February 2020, University of Manchester.  

Keynote speaker: Professor Javed Majeed, King’s College London.

The effects of colonial power dynamics on knowledge creation in the long nineteenth century and beyond are well known and have become the foundation of a postcolonial reading of British scholarship in the context of empire. What has been less well examined are the practical effects of the colonial context on knowledge making.    

PAMLA 2019: Poetry and Poetics

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:53am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 10, 2019

PAMLA 2019 – Poetry and Poetics

Presiding Officer: Tom Jesse (University of Wisconsin-La Crosse)

Proposal Deadline: June 10, 2019

For this year’s “Poetry and Poetics” session, we are open to paper topics that span a wide range of (sub)genres, time periods, and critical approaches. Given the PAMLA 2019 conference theme of “Send In the Clowns,” we are especially interested in papers that engage with poetic “clowning” of all sorts—including but not limited to:

Passing on: Property, Family and Death in Narratives of Inheritance

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:54am
Aarhus University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 21, 2019

From Shakespeare’s King Lear to Flaubert’s Frédéric Moreau, who lives off of his uncle’s money, and Edward St Aubyn’s novels about the troubled heir Patrick Melrose, literature has always been occupied with inheritance and inherited wealth. The insights provided by this literary legacy are more important than ever. Once considered a relic from the aristocratic past superseded by liberal meritocracy, inherited wealth is now recognized as a source of rising social inequality. It therefore poses an important challenge for the present – and for the future. To meet this challenge, inheritance must be understood in all its historical and cultural complexity. For inheritance is more than a means of transferring wealth between generations.

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