eighteenth century

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CFP: The Publishing Contexts of Eighteenth-Century Exploration Narratives (9/20/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Monday, September 12, 2005 - 3:12pm
Dr. R Kent-Drury

"The Publishing Contexts of Eighteenth-Century Exploration Narratives"
Roxanne Kent-Drury, Literature & Language Dept., Northern Kentucky U., LA
543, Highland Heights, KY 41099; Tel: 859/572-6636; Fax: 859/572-6093;
E-mail: rkdrury_at_nku.edu
This panel would provide a forum for book history research pertaining to
eighteenth century exploration narratives. Book history research continues
to be concerned with the physical properties of books and the material
conditions of their production, yet the field has expanded in recent years
to embrace the entire range of social conditions that may have influenced
the conception, writing, publication, and distribution of books. Recent

CFP: Word and Image in the 18th C. (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Saturday, September 10, 2005 - 4:39pm
rschelle_at_mta.ca

WORD AND IMAGE (ASECS, March 30-April 2, 2006)

This panel seeks to investigate the interaction between verbal and visual
languages in the art and literature of eighteenth-century Europe. Approaches
may draw upon such diverse fields as art history and image theory, cultural
studies, literary theory, visual semiotics, book history and print culture.
Some possible topics include: portraits in the text, engraving, illustrated
narratives and cartography, verbal description, and film adaptations of
eighteenth-century works. The objective is to engage in a stimulating dialogue
on the mutual collaboration of these two very rich forms of expression.

UPDATE: The Contractual Imperative in 18th Century Britain (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Sunday, September 4, 2005 - 12:47pm
Stephen_Meagher_at_baruch.cuny.edu

Perhaps "imperative" seems too insistent a term to describe the spread of
contractual logic and rhetoric in the English 18th century; yet, the "will
to influence the behavior of another" is evident in 18th century
periodicals, conduct manuals and novels. Are there terms that better
describe this phenomena, or analyses that better illuminate it?

CFP: Cruel and Unusual Mothers in the Eighteenth Century (10/25/05; SCSECS, 2/23/06-2/26/06)

updated: 
Sunday, September 4, 2005 - 12:46pm
Mesa-Pelly, Judith

CFP: South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
 
Cocoa Beach, Florida, 23-26 February 2006
 
 
"'Monsters of inhumanity': Mothers, Cruel and Unusual"
 
Proposals from all disciplines invited on cruel or unusual mothers in fact or fiction. Possible topics include: infanticide, child abuse, emotional abuse, neglect, abandonment, mothers with unusual professions, very young or very old mothers, extraordinary births, or other types of mothers whose lifestyle or mothering practices may have been cruel, illegal, or just out of the mainstream.
 
250-word proposals, email preferred, by 25 October 2005 to mesapellyj_at_apsu.edu
 
Judith Broome
Department of Languages and Literature

CFP: Intersections: Traffic and Transportation in the Early Modern Period & The Representation of Subtle Bodies (10/1/05; jo

updated: 
Sunday, September 4, 2005 - 12:46pm
Todd, R.K.

I should be grateful if the following calls for papers could be posted =
on your site. As you will see, Intersections is a series of primary =
interest to scholars working in the early modern period.

START TEXT:

CALL FOR PAPERS - Intersections vol. 8 and 9

Vol. 8: Traffic and transportation in the Early Modern Period Vol. 9: =
Spirits Unseen: The Representation of Subtle Bodies in Early Modern =
European Culture [please scroll down]

UPDATE: Narratives in English by Women Explorers and Travellers 1700-1940 (France) (9/20/05; 2/3/06-2/4/06)

updated: 
Sunday, August 28, 2005 - 6:35pm
bijon

Deadline extended:

UPDATE/CFP: Narratives in English by Women Explorers and Travellers
1700-1940 (France) (9/20/05; 2/3/06-2/4/06)

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
FEBRUARY 3-4, 2006
UNIVERSITY OF SAINT-ETIENNE (FRANCE)

    While 18th and 19th century women were usually confined to the domestic
and national spheres some women indulged their dreams and travelled to
unexplored territories: their journeys to the Orient (Lady Montagu, Lady
Blunt, Gertrude Bell, Amelia Edwards, Freya Stark), to India (Emily Eden,
Fanny Parks), to America (Isabella Bird, Clara Bromley, France Trollope), to
Africa (Mary Kingsley) or to Australia (Daisy Bates) gave rise to
narratives.

CFP: Eighteenth-Century Multitudes (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 11:42am
Wolfram Schmidgen

ASECS Panel, Montreal 2006
"Eighteenth-Century Multitudes"
        
        
Current developments in our field force us to rethink widely accepted
paradigms in eighteenth-century studies. Dror Wahrman's The Making of
the Modern Self, for example, fundamentally revises our assumptions
about the singularity of modern forms of identity. Recent theorizing
about 'multitude' by Toni Negri, Michael Hardt, Paolo Virno and others
has widened the possibilities for reimagining agency and identity
further. This panel wants to take advantage of these developments and
explore the role of the plural, the multiple, and the collective in
eighteenth-century culture and history. If the philosophical concern

CFP: Sex, Secularism & Enlightenment (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 2, 2005 - 4:21pm
Lori Branch

American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
37th Annual Meeting
Montreal, Quebec, March 30-April 2, 2006

Session Title: "Sex, Secularism and Enlightenment"

In <Formations of the Secular>, Talal Asad has described secularism as a
political ideology that took shape in the nineteenth century, based on the
concept of "the secular" that coalesced in early modernity and the
eighteenth century. What role did sex and gender play in this
conceptualization of the secular, in religious and non-religious texts and
identities? What are the sexualized components of a secular identity or
subjectivity? How do they impact the transformation of religious
identities in the period?

CFP: The Contractual Imperative in 18th Century Britain (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Friday, July 29, 2005 - 12:40pm
Stephen_Meagher_at_baruch.cuny.edu

This panel will explore the ways in which the logic of contract and the
rhetoric of promise permeate and organize British culture in the eighteenth
century. Victoria Kahn's Wayward Contracts is one of the more noteworthy
recent studies that interpret the ways in which this logic and rhetoric
contribute to cultural formation. Her formulation of contract as a "new
poetics of the subject" is one of many possible engagements with this
theme.
In the past decade the cultural, marriage, mimetic, sociable, social and
racial contracts have received comment and analysis.
This panel welcomes one to two page proposals that address the history and

CFP: An Collins (10/15/05; collection)

updated: 
Friday, July 29, 2005 - 12:39pm
SCOTT HOWARD

Essays by emerging and established scholars wanted for a volume that
promises to be the first edited collection devoted to the poetry, life,
times, and literary reception of An Collins, author of _Divine Songs and
Meditacions_ (1653).

The working title for this project is: _The Image of Her Mind: An Collins
and the Historical Imagination_.

Essays on any aspect of Collins' work will be considered, but the
following topics/perspectives may be of particular importance for the
volume's design:

CFP: The Strange Eighteenth Century (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Friday, July 29, 2005 - 12:39pm
Jesse Molesworth, Mr

Call for Paper Proposals:
 
American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
Montreal, Quebec
March 30 - April 2, 2006
 
The Strange Eighteenth Century:
 
If the physical world undoubtedly became less "strange" in the eighteenth century, then the people inhabiting it were becoming, perversely, stranger than ever. The vast movement toward large urban communities surely produced a particularly modern phenomenon - the sensation of being surrounded at all times by complete and utter strangers. Proposals are invited for papers examining the ramifications of such estrangements, or for similar considerations of the concept of "the strange" within eighteenth-century culture.
 

CFP: Domestic Violence in the Long Eighteenth Century (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Sunday, July 17, 2005 - 8:04pm
Mesa-Pelly, Judith

Papers are invited that examine the various ways in which domestic violence was conceived, discussed, represented, punished, hidden, or enabled during the long eighteenth century.
 
250-word abstracts by 15 September 2005 (email preferred) to:
 
Judith Broome Mesa-Pelly
Department of Languages & Literature
Austin Peay State University
Clarksville TN 37044
931-221-7892
mesapellyj_at_apsu.edu
 
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                        CFP_at_english.upenn.edu
                         Full Information at

CFP: Cartography and Nation in the Long 18th Century (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 13, 2005 - 11:38am
Adam Sills

This panel will explore connections between mapping, cartographic =
discourse, and the production of British national identity during the =
long eighteenth century. A substantial and useful body of work in this =
area is available within Renaissance studies, initiated, in large =
measure, by Richard Helgerson's now seminal Forms of Nationhood. =
According to Helgerson, the production of the national body is =
dependent, to an extent, on cartographic representation in that it =
allows both commoner and courtesan to visualize the nation spatially =
and, more importantly, to imaginatively project a space in which they =
may realize themselves as subjects of the nation. However, does this =

CFP: Constructing Deviant Identities in 18th-Century Media (9/20/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Thursday, June 23, 2005 - 8:34pm
Anja Müller

This is a call for proposals for a seminar on "Constructing Deviant
Identities in Eighteenth-Century Media" at next year's ASECS at
Montreal.
In the seminar, we shall discuss how subjects who deviated from what
was considered the 'legitimate' norm (e.g. criminals, whores,
homosexuals, lunatics) were represented in different
eighteenth-century media contexts, such as pamphlets, caricatures,
prints, novels, or painting.
Papers should address how these representations worked rather than who or w=
hat
was represented. I.e., in how far are exclusive social practices
realized and reflected in forms of representation that were typical of part=
icular media?

CFP: 18th- and 19th-C. British Women Writers (9/30/05; BWWC, 3/23/06-3/26/06)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 7:51pm
Lisa Hager

The 14th Annual
Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Women Writers Conference
March 23-26, 2006
The University of Florida

Call for Papers

This year's theme, "(Re)Collecting British Women Writers," encourages
interdisciplinary approaches to writers of the period, with a special
interest in issues related to archival scholarship and memory and how
those issues manifest themselves in collections, exhibitions, and canons.

We are very pleased to announce that our keynote speakers will be Talia
Schaffer (CUNY-Queens College), Carolyn Steedman (University of
Warwick), and Lynne Vallone (Texas A&M University).

We encourage proposals focusing on but not limited to:

CFP: 2006 ASECS Gay &amp; Lesbian Caucus (9/16/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Tuesday, May 24, 2005 - 4:41pm
AURORA WOLFGANG

CFP: 2006 ASECS Gay & Lesbian Caucus (Montreal)

The Gay & Lesbian Caucus of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies is proposing two panels for
the upcoming meeting in Montreal, March 30 to April 2, 2006.

(1) "In And Out Around The Academy" (Roundtable)
This panel seeks personal narratives and reflections on job experiences which will generate discussion of the
practical issues of professional life for our constituency.

CFP: Literature and the Addicted Subject (11/15/05; collection)

updated: 
Monday, May 16, 2005 - 3:43pm
Comitini, Patricia Prof.

We're soliciting papers for a volume tentatively titled Literature and
the Addicted Subject, 1700-Present. This volume will examine how the
post-Romantic conception of literature constructs both the possibility
and our understanding of addiction. While there are collections and
books that discuss the addictions of authors or representations of
addiction, the focus of this book is substantially different: it seeks
to examine how addiction is a historical phenomenon that is enabled by
particular ideological and cultural preconditions. Thus, we do not
assume addiction's existence prima facie, and do not assume it is one
thing at all times. Addiction needs particular historical preconditions:

CFP: Hemlow Prize in Burney Studies (grad) (6/1/05; journal issue)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 4, 2005 - 1:22am
Bilger, Audrey

Hemlow Prize in Burney Studies

The Burney Society invites submissions for the Hemlow Prize, named in
honor of the late Joyce Hemlow, Greenshields Professor of English at
McGill University, whose biography of Frances Burney and edition of her
journals and letters are among the foundational works of
eighteenth-century literary scholarship.

CFP: DeBartolo Conference on Eighteenth-Century Studies: &quot;The Book&quot; (9/30/05; 2/16/06-2/18/06)

updated: 
Sunday, April 24, 2005 - 3:03pm
Nickinson, Patricia

THE TWENTIETH ANNUAL DEBARTOLO CONFERENCE ON=20
EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY STUDIES
~ CALL FOR PAPERS ~

THE BOOK

February 16-18, 2006 Tampa, Florida

With the 20th Anniversary in 2006, the DeBartolo Conference on
Eighteenth-century Studies will reach the conclusion of its long,
successful run. Our finale celebration will feature keynote lectures by
distinguished scholars Robert C. Darnton, Margaret J.M. Ezell, and David
D. Hall. Other honored participants include Paula Backscheider,
Alistair Duckworth, J. Paul Hunter, Jessica Munns, James Raven, and Pat
Rogers.

CFP: A History of Sexual Perversion 1650-1850 (6/1/05; collection)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 20, 2005 - 1:19pm
Julie Peakman

CALL FOR PAPERS

 Contributors are sought for a new book on 'A History of Sexual
Perversion 1650-1850'. We specifically seek articles within the boundaries
of history of sexuality which examine so-called sexual 'perversions'; this
might include any sexual behaviour which was considered 'abnormal' for
its time and would include certain heterosexual, homosexual, lesbian,
transgender, transvestite etc. practices; and why was such behaviour was
seen as 'abnormal', 'perverse' or threatening; subjects for discussion
might be considered include bestiality, flagellation, sex with children,
fetishes, sado-masochism etc.

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