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eighteenth century

CFP: The Contractual Imperative in 18th Century Britain (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

Friday, July 29, 2005 - 12:40pm

This panel will explore the ways in which the logic of contract and the
rhetoric of promise permeate and organize British culture in the eighteenth
century. Victoria Kahn's Wayward Contracts is one of the more noteworthy
recent studies that interpret the ways in which this logic and rhetoric
contribute to cultural formation. Her formulation of contract as a "new
poetics of the subject" is one of many possible engagements with this
In the past decade the cultural, marriage, mimetic, sociable, social and
racial contracts have received comment and analysis.
This panel welcomes one to two page proposals that address the history and

CFP: An Collins (10/15/05; collection)

Friday, July 29, 2005 - 12:39pm

Essays by emerging and established scholars wanted for a volume that
promises to be the first edited collection devoted to the poetry, life,
times, and literary reception of An Collins, author of _Divine Songs and
Meditacions_ (1653).

The working title for this project is: _The Image of Her Mind: An Collins
and the Historical Imagination_.

Essays on any aspect of Collins' work will be considered, but the
following topics/perspectives may be of particular importance for the
volume's design:

CFP: The Strange Eighteenth Century (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

Friday, July 29, 2005 - 12:39pm
Jesse Molesworth, Mr

Call for Paper Proposals:
American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
Montreal, Quebec
March 30 - April 2, 2006
The Strange Eighteenth Century:
If the physical world undoubtedly became less "strange" in the eighteenth century, then the people inhabiting it were becoming, perversely, stranger than ever. The vast movement toward large urban communities surely produced a particularly modern phenomenon - the sensation of being surrounded at all times by complete and utter strangers. Proposals are invited for papers examining the ramifications of such estrangements, or for similar considerations of the concept of "the strange" within eighteenth-century culture.

CFP: Domestic Violence in the Long Eighteenth Century (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

Sunday, July 17, 2005 - 8:04pm
Mesa-Pelly, Judith

Papers are invited that examine the various ways in which domestic violence was conceived, discussed, represented, punished, hidden, or enabled during the long eighteenth century.
250-word abstracts by 15 September 2005 (email preferred) to:
Judith Broome Mesa-Pelly
Department of Languages & Literature
Austin Peay State University
Clarksville TN 37044
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CFP: Cartography and Nation in the Long 18th Century (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

Wednesday, July 13, 2005 - 11:38am
Adam Sills

This panel will explore connections between mapping, cartographic =
discourse, and the production of British national identity during the =
long eighteenth century. A substantial and useful body of work in this =
area is available within Renaissance studies, initiated, in large =
measure, by Richard Helgerson's now seminal Forms of Nationhood. =
According to Helgerson, the production of the national body is =
dependent, to an extent, on cartographic representation in that it =
allows both commoner and courtesan to visualize the nation spatially =
and, more importantly, to imaginatively project a space in which they =
may realize themselves as subjects of the nation. However, does this =

CFP: Constructing Deviant Identities in 18th-Century Media (9/20/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

Thursday, June 23, 2005 - 8:34pm
Anja Müller

This is a call for proposals for a seminar on "Constructing Deviant
Identities in Eighteenth-Century Media" at next year's ASECS at
In the seminar, we shall discuss how subjects who deviated from what
was considered the 'legitimate' norm (e.g. criminals, whores,
homosexuals, lunatics) were represented in different
eighteenth-century media contexts, such as pamphlets, caricatures,
prints, novels, or painting.
Papers should address how these representations worked rather than who or w=
was represented. I.e., in how far are exclusive social practices
realized and reflected in forms of representation that were typical of part=
icular media?