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eighteenth century

UPDATE: Narratives in English by Women Explorers and Travellers 1700-1940 (France) (9/20/05; 2/3/06-2/4/06)

updated: 
Sunday, August 28, 2005 - 6:35pm
bijon

Deadline extended:

UPDATE/CFP: Narratives in English by Women Explorers and Travellers
1700-1940 (France) (9/20/05; 2/3/06-2/4/06)

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
FEBRUARY 3-4, 2006
UNIVERSITY OF SAINT-ETIENNE (FRANCE)

    While 18th and 19th century women were usually confined to the domestic
and national spheres some women indulged their dreams and travelled to
unexplored territories: their journeys to the Orient (Lady Montagu, Lady
Blunt, Gertrude Bell, Amelia Edwards, Freya Stark), to India (Emily Eden,
Fanny Parks), to America (Isabella Bird, Clara Bromley, France Trollope), to
Africa (Mary Kingsley) or to Australia (Daisy Bates) gave rise to
narratives.

CFP: Eighteenth-Century Multitudes (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 11:42am
Wolfram Schmidgen

ASECS Panel, Montreal 2006
"Eighteenth-Century Multitudes"
        
        
Current developments in our field force us to rethink widely accepted
paradigms in eighteenth-century studies. Dror Wahrman's The Making of
the Modern Self, for example, fundamentally revises our assumptions
about the singularity of modern forms of identity. Recent theorizing
about 'multitude' by Toni Negri, Michael Hardt, Paolo Virno and others
has widened the possibilities for reimagining agency and identity
further. This panel wants to take advantage of these developments and
explore the role of the plural, the multiple, and the collective in
eighteenth-century culture and history. If the philosophical concern

CFP: Sex, Secularism & Enlightenment (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 2, 2005 - 4:21pm
Lori Branch

American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
37th Annual Meeting
Montreal, Quebec, March 30-April 2, 2006

Session Title: "Sex, Secularism and Enlightenment"

In <Formations of the Secular>, Talal Asad has described secularism as a
political ideology that took shape in the nineteenth century, based on the
concept of "the secular" that coalesced in early modernity and the
eighteenth century. What role did sex and gender play in this
conceptualization of the secular, in religious and non-religious texts and
identities? What are the sexualized components of a secular identity or
subjectivity? How do they impact the transformation of religious
identities in the period?

CFP: The Contractual Imperative in 18th Century Britain (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Friday, July 29, 2005 - 12:40pm
Stephen_Meagher_at_baruch.cuny.edu

This panel will explore the ways in which the logic of contract and the
rhetoric of promise permeate and organize British culture in the eighteenth
century. Victoria Kahn's Wayward Contracts is one of the more noteworthy
recent studies that interpret the ways in which this logic and rhetoric
contribute to cultural formation. Her formulation of contract as a "new
poetics of the subject" is one of many possible engagements with this
theme.
In the past decade the cultural, marriage, mimetic, sociable, social and
racial contracts have received comment and analysis.
This panel welcomes one to two page proposals that address the history and

CFP: An Collins (10/15/05; collection)

updated: 
Friday, July 29, 2005 - 12:39pm
SCOTT HOWARD

Essays by emerging and established scholars wanted for a volume that
promises to be the first edited collection devoted to the poetry, life,
times, and literary reception of An Collins, author of _Divine Songs and
Meditacions_ (1653).

The working title for this project is: _The Image of Her Mind: An Collins
and the Historical Imagination_.

Essays on any aspect of Collins' work will be considered, but the
following topics/perspectives may be of particular importance for the
volume's design:

CFP: The Strange Eighteenth Century (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Friday, July 29, 2005 - 12:39pm
Jesse Molesworth, Mr

Call for Paper Proposals:
 
American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
Montreal, Quebec
March 30 - April 2, 2006
 
The Strange Eighteenth Century:
 
If the physical world undoubtedly became less "strange" in the eighteenth century, then the people inhabiting it were becoming, perversely, stranger than ever. The vast movement toward large urban communities surely produced a particularly modern phenomenon - the sensation of being surrounded at all times by complete and utter strangers. Proposals are invited for papers examining the ramifications of such estrangements, or for similar considerations of the concept of "the strange" within eighteenth-century culture.
 

CFP: Domestic Violence in the Long Eighteenth Century (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Sunday, July 17, 2005 - 8:04pm
Mesa-Pelly, Judith

Papers are invited that examine the various ways in which domestic violence was conceived, discussed, represented, punished, hidden, or enabled during the long eighteenth century.
 
250-word abstracts by 15 September 2005 (email preferred) to:
 
Judith Broome Mesa-Pelly
Department of Languages & Literature
Austin Peay State University
Clarksville TN 37044
931-221-7892
mesapellyj_at_apsu.edu
 
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