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ethnicity and national identity

CFP: Arab Culture in the U.S. (11/1/05; SW/TX PCA/ACA, 2/8/06-2/11/06)

updated: 
Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 8:35pm
Lutfi M Hussein

Area CFP: Arab Culture in the U.S. (11/1/05; PCA/ACA, 2/8/06-2/11/06)

Southwest/Texas Popular Culture Association & American Culture Association
The 27th Annual Conference
February 8-11, 2006
http://www.h-net.org/~swpca/

Albuquerque, New Mexico
Hyatt Regency Albuquerque
http://albuquerque.hyatt.com/property/index.jhtml

Proposals for both panels and individual papers are now being accepted for
the new Area, Arab Culture in the U.S. Here is a possible but not
exhaustive list of topics. Other themes/topics are encouraged and welcome.

CFP: Native American Literature (10/28/05; journal issue)

updated: 
Sunday, July 17, 2005 - 8:04pm
Susan Cannata

Call for Submissions

The 2006 edition of Pembroke Magazinewill be a special edition focusing
on Native American literature. The magazine will feature a section of
work by Native authors from North Carolina, a section in remembrance of
the late Choctaw/Cherokee/Irish writer Louis Owens, a section of
scholarly essays on Native American literature, and many works by
contemporary Native American writers. Please send submissions (and a
brief bio) or any correspondence to:

 
Dr. Jesse Peters
University Honors College
UNC Pembroke
One University Drive
Pembroke, NC 28372
(910) 521-6841
peters_at_uncp.edu

Deadline: October 28, 2005

CFP: Africana Studies Area (11/15/05; SW/TX PCA/ACA, 2/8/06-2/11/06)

updated: 
Sunday, July 17, 2005 - 8:03pm
Delia Gillis

      Africana Studies Area
      27th Annual Southwest/Texas Popular Culture/American Culture Association
      Albuquerque, New Mexico
      February 8-11, 2006
      CONFERENCE WEBSITE:
      Proposals are now being accepted for the Africana Studies Area. Some suggestions are listed below for presentations, but topics not included are also welcome.

CFP: American Indian Literatures and Cultures in the South (1/30/06; journal issue)

updated: 
Friday, July 8, 2005 - 2:25pm
Arnold, Ellen

Call for Papers

Special Issue: Mississippi Quarterly

American Indian Literatures and Cultures in the South

Mississippi Quarterly invites submissions for a special issue on
American Indian literatures and cultures in the South to be published
late in 2006. Critical and historical essays on any genre or period will
be considered.

Completed essays of no more than 10,000 words should be submitted by
Jan. 30, 2006.

Email submissions (Microsoft Word or Richtext only) are preferred.
Essays should follow the MLA Handbook (6th ed.).

Please address inquiries, proposals, or submissions to:

Ellen L. Arnold

2145 Bate

Dept. of English

East Carolina University

CFP: Native/Indigenous Studies Area (11/15/05; SW/TX PCA/ACA, 2/8/06-2/11/06)

updated: 
Friday, July 8, 2005 - 2:25pm
Sara

***PLEASE FORWARD WIDELY***

 

Call for Papers: Native/Indigenous Studies Area
2006 Southwest/Texas Popular Culture/American Culture Association

February 8-11, 2006

Southwest/Texas Popular & American Culture Association's
27th Annual Conference in Albuquerque, NM

Proposals for both Panels and Individual Papers are now being accepted for the Native/Indigenous Studies Area. Listed below are some suggestions for possible presentations, but topics not included here are welcome and encouraged.

The deadline for submitting proposals is November 15, 2005.

CFP: Eat, Drink, and Be Hungry: Ireland and Consumption (10/15/05; 3/3/06-3/5/06)

updated: 
Sunday, July 3, 2005 - 6:01pm
EGilmar100_at_aol.com

CFP: Eat, Drink, and Be Hungry: Ireland and Consumption
Eighth Annual Grian Conference
3-5 March 2006
Glucksman Ireland House
New York University

Bless us, O Cleric, famous pillar of learning,
Son of honey-bag, son of juice, son of lard,
Son of stirabout, son of porridge, son of fair-speckled clusters of fruit,
Son of smooth clustering cream, son of buttermilk, son of curds[.] (trans.
Kuno Meyer)

CFP: Contemporary Scottish Fiction (9/15/05; NEMLA, 3/2/06-3/5/06)

updated: 
Sunday, July 3, 2005 - 6:00pm
rmorace_at_daemen.edu

The second "Scottish Renaissance" which is often said to have begun with
the publication of Lanark and which reached a high point with the
publication of Trainspotting appears to have reached a new stage
following devolution and the establishment of Scotland's first parliament
in nearly three hundred years. Scotland's recently changed political
situation suggests a number of questions regarding the present and future
of contemporary Scottish fiction. Has devolution changed the implied role
of the Scottish fiction writer and the reception of and/or market for
contemporary Scottish fiction? What part, if any, does recent Scottish
fiction play in the forming, or questioning, of a national political

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