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film and television

MONSTERS VS. ALIENS: GENDER, POWER, AND SEXUALITY IN THE "ALIEN" AND "UNDERWORLD" FILMS

updated: 
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 11:30am
Dr. Christie Rinck, University of South Florida
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 31, 2017

MONSTERS VS. ALIENS: GENDER, POWER, AND SEXUALITY IN THE ALIEN AND UNDERWORLD FILMS

 

The portrayal of women warriors in literature and popular culture is a subject of study in history, literary studies, film studies, folklore, and mythology.  In 2011, Rebecca Stringer noted the archetypal figure of the woman warrior is an example of a normal thing that happens in some cultures, while also being a counter stereotype, opporing the normal construction of war, violence and agression as masculine.  This convention-defying position makes the female warrior (or, shero, heroine, hero) a prominent topic of investigation for discourses surrounding female power and gender roles in society.

Crime Fiction(s): Victorian and Neo-Victorian Narratives of Crime and Punishment

updated: 
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 10:26am
Dr Anne Schwan / Edinburgh Napier University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 15, 2017

Crime Fiction(s): Victorian and Neo-Victorian Narratives of Crime and Punishment

 

An interdisciplinary one-day conference at Edinburgh Napier University

Friday 27th April 2018

 

Co-hosted by the Scottish Centre for Victorian and Neo-Victorian Studies (SCVS), the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR), and the Centre for Literature and Writing (CLAW) at Edinburgh Napier

 

The Geek and Popular Culture

updated: 
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 10:25am
Southwest Popular/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Call for Papers

THE GEEK AND POPULAR CULTURE

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA)

 

39th Annual Conference, February 7-10, 2018

Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center

Albuquerque, New Mexico

http://www.southwestpca.org

Proposal submission deadline: November 15, 2017

 

CFP - Myth and Fairy Tales

updated: 
Monday, October 16, 2017 - 12:34pm
SWPACA (Southwest Popular and American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 22, 2017

All scholars working in the areas of myth and/or fairy tales are invited to submit paper or panel proposals for the upcoming SWPACA Conference. Panels are now forming on topics related to all aspects of myths and fairy tales and their connections to popular culture. To participate in this area, you do not need to present on both myths and fairy tales; one or the other is perfectly fine. Presentations considering both genres are of course welcome and can stimulate interesting discussions. Proposals for forming your own Myth or Fairy Tale-focused panel – especially panels focused on one particular myth/tale – are encouraged.

Paper topics might include (but are certainly not limited to):

Beyond Hollywood: Independent, International, and DIY Productions

updated: 
Friday, October 13, 2017 - 12:29pm
The Projector: A Journal on Film, Media, and Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 1, 2018

The Projector is developing a special issue on film and media productions created by and for individuals and constituencies interested in something other than standard Hollywood fare.  The issue is for research that illuminates the cultural, historical, aesthetic, or material dimensions of productions that contribute to the remarkable but far less visible traditions of independent, international, or DIY film and media – traditions that give voice to people consistently left out of Hollywood’s long history of insular, hegemonic, and formulaic representations.  

The Grimm Mouse: Violence in Post-9/11 Animated Disney Films

updated: 
Saturday, October 14, 2017 - 6:30pm
Christie Rinck and Heidi Tilley Kramer, University of South Florida
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 5, 2018

THE GRIMM MOUSE: VIOLENCE IN POST-9/11 ANIMATED DISNEY FILMS

 

In 2009, Hubka, Hovdestad and Tonmyr examined Disney animated films from 1937-2006 for "child endangerment," finding a total of 26 of the 42 (62%) main characters were maltreated at least once.  This trend continues in contemporary American G and PG rated animated features.

Not only are child characters in these films treated and portrayed poorly, 9/11 related themes have skyrocketed since 2001; these include issues of patriotism versus nationalism, the security state, and even torture scense.  For example, think of toddler Boo strapped into the torture chair ("scream extractor") in Monsters, Inc.

Listening to Refugees & Immigrants

updated: 
Thursday, October 12, 2017 - 1:32pm
albeit
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 15, 2018

albeit, an innovative, MLA-indexed online journal of scholarship and pedagogy, invites scholarly articles, detailed lesson plans, book reviews, creative pieces, and nonfiction essays exploring the theme of literature by and concerning refugees and immigrants.

Topics for this issue can include, but are not limited to:
Fictional accounts of exile
The Jewish diaspora
Literature of political disillusionment
The role of nostalgia in displaced writers
Being “at home” in America
Trauma and/as emigration
Representations of exile in comics and graphic novels

Tick, Tick, DOOM!

updated: 
Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - 9:50am
SUNY at Buffalo Dept. of Comparative Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Call for Papers:

 

 “Tick. Tick. DOOM!: Precariousness and Time”

 

The Fourth Annual Undergraduate Symposium of Popular Culture and Philosophy

Hosted by the SUNY at Buffalo Department of Comparative Literature Graduate Student Association

Keynote Speaker: Shaun Irlam, PhD

Featured Graduate Presenters: TBA

Friday, November 17th, 2017, 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.

The Condition of Contradiction: Implications for Globalization, Identity & Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - 9:49am
Saint Louis University, Madrid Spain
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 8, 2018

Call for Papers: The advent of neoliberalism after the 1970s in “core” western economies has unleashed a relatively deregulated and more palpably globalized economy. The results have been convulsive in the socio-economic concomitants and contradictions that have followed. They include: intensified, bare-knuckled class striation alongside tendencies toward intensified tolerance and mixing; finance that moves more readily across borders than (many) flesh-and-blood people; cosmopolitanism alongside re-invigorated identity essentialism; and places and identities stuck between global forces and renewed assertions of localism. And all of it subject to 24-hour globalized, new media display.

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