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NeMLA Panel 2017 - Blasphemous Translation

updated: 
Thursday, July 14, 2016 - 11:52am
Manuela Borzone
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This is a CFP for a panel at NeMLA 2017 in Baltimore, MD.

In The Location of Culture (1991), Homi Bhabha introduces the term “cultural translation” as a way to read how “newness” enters the “world,” i.e., postcolonial and minority voices, even if the result might be “blasphemy as a transgressive act of cultural translation” (225-27). Blasphemy, read as a form of newness (which Bhabha decouples from Rushdie’s fatwa and links to survival and dreaming), is then an attempt to desacralize what is already established as sacred, or canonical. 

Experience and Education: Pragmatism in the English Studies Classroom - Panel @ NeMLA 2017

updated: 
Wednesday, July 13, 2016 - 8:05pm
Matthew Overstreet / University of Pittsburgh
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This panel seeks to bring together teacher-scholars who utilize the philosophical tradition of American Pragmatism in teaching literature, writing, digital media, cultural criticism or rhetoric and composition.

This includes those who teach the work of William James, John Dewey and their progeny directly, and those who use pragmatist thought to inform broader pedagogical or theoretical projects.  Whether interested in the semiotics of C.S. Peirce, the neo-pragmatism of Richard Rorty or Stanley Fish, the “prophetic pragmatism” of Cornel West, or any other branch of the pragmatist tradition, all are welcome.

[UPDATED **Extended Submission**] CFP // Games and Literary Theory Collection

updated: 
Wednesday, July 13, 2016 - 6:27am
Timothy Welsh
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 15, 2016

CFP // Games and Literary Theory Collection -- EXTENDED SUBMISSION

We are soliciting proposals for a collection of essays at the intersection of game studies and literary theory.

This coming year will mark the fourth meeting of the International Conference Series on Games and Literary Theory at Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. Having hosted the previous two meetings, we have witnessed a rich diversity of scholarship claiming this interdisciplinary field. Yet, we have also noted in the breadth of approaches a lack of a shared disciplinary history or critical archive.

Dislocating Masculinity

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 4:10pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

In the past year, The New York Times has rekindled a decades-long national conversation about crises in American masculinity with articles titled “Teaching Men to Be Emotionally Honest” and “A Master’s Degree in… Masculinity?” These pieces of popular journalism look (warily) to the academy to demystify what it means to be a man; this panel turns the lens back on popular culture to trace how contemporary popular narratives produce images of masculine feeling and masculine crisis. As The New York Times pieces attest, the field of masculinity studies has gained traction in a political climate in which calls for gender equality and gender diversity are growing louder and more insistent.

Coldnoon Cities London – Lahore – Cairo – Calcutta (Call for Submissions) IInd Round of Call for Submissions

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 1:45pm
Coldnoon: Travel Poetics (International Journal of Travel Writing)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 30, 2016

 Mapping the Metropolis: Coldnoon CitiesLondon – Lahore – Cairo – Calcutta (Call for Submissions)

 

To read the concept note and call for submissions, please visit: http://coldnoon.com/mapping-the-metropolis-london-lahore-cairo-calcutta/

 

X Marks the Spot: Lyric Chiasmus and Chiastic Lyrics

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 11:16am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

For a moment in time, a generation ago, apostrophe became for some scholars the embodiment of the lyric gesture itself. In Jonathan Culler’s words, apostrophe signals “not a moment in a temporal sequence but a now of discourse, of writing,” typified by the poetic “O.” Long the neglected step-sibling of lyric apostrophe, chiasmus (“a crosswise placing” from the Greek letter chi) embodies the boustrophedonic turns of repetition and reversal, which also might be seen at the heart of the lyric. Where apostrophe involves a turning away to address an absent person, thing, or idea, chiasmus seems to turn inward—to sound, form, image.

CfP: Out of This World: strangeness, estrangement and alienation in Global South literature

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 10:55am
Alya El Hosseiny / ACLA 2017 (Utrecht, July 6-9)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

Narratives of discovery have long been produced in Europe about the Global South. Whether travel narratives describing the wonders of the New World, tales of survival in a savage Africa, or a nineteenth-century poet's Voyage en Orient, these texts have made of the Global South the site of estrangement and reexamination of the European self. However, the non-European subject is left unexplored, as in Camus' The Stranger, a novel taking place in French-colonized Algeria, and which notoriously elides the non-European Other, the unnamed Arab murder victim. In this seminar, we turn the tables to examine narratives of estrangement and alienation in Global South literature.

Modernist Forms of Fidelity (NeMLA 2017)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 10:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

NeMLA 48, Baltimore, Maryland, March 23-26, 2017

Modernist Forms of Fidelity

Writing in the Digital Age: Surveillance, Privacy, and Writing Infrastructures

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 10:50am
Estee Beck and Les Hutchinson
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 17, 2016

For over the past twenty years, writing studies scholarship has addressed issues of surveillance and privacy within writing infrastructures through course management systems, plagiarism detection software, and social media use in classrooms.

The Book Review: Contemporary Forms, Forums, and Forces

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 10:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Academic literary critics have long eyed book reviewers, their public counterparts, with suspicion. For example, in The Armed Vision, a 1948 study of the methods of modern literary criticism, Stanley Edgar Hyman makes the following heavily weighted distinction, "the reviewer, more or less, is interested in books as commodities; the critic in books as literature." However, the past 15 years have seen a proliferation of forms and forums for online writing about books that combine the literary and the commodity in complex and interesting ways, deconstructing and reevaluating the distinctions between these terms.

[Seminar] Legacy and the Androgynous Mind: Reading Woolf and the Romantics

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 10:50am
NeMLA 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

“One must turn back to Shakespeare then, for Shakespeare was androgynous; and so were Keats and Sterne and Cowper and Lamb and Coleridge[…] Some collaboration has to take place in the mind between the woman and the man before the art of creation can be accomplished. Some marriage of opposites has to be consummated” (Woolf, A Room of One’s Own).

 

A Century without Chaucer (Kalamazoo 2017)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 10:50am
Lydgate Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

The shadow of Geoffrey Chaucer loomed large over the century after his death.  Later poets such as John Lydgate used words coined by him, explicitly referenced Chaucer’s mastery of poetry, and mentioned their relationship with him in the development of their poetic personae and the writing of their poetic works.  These connections, in turn, have left a tradition of scholarship that takes such conceits at face value and maligns the poetry of the fifteenth century for allegedly not being the equal of Chaucer’s.

Lydgate and Literary Technologies - A Roundtable (Kalamazoo 2017)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 10:50am
Lydgate Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Whether it is tweeting Lydgate’s Fall of Princes, making witnesses of his poems both in and out of the codex available to scholars worldwide, or engaging in digital prosopography, the “Digital Turn” in recent literary scholarship provides heretofore unavailable opportunities for engagement with the poetry of John Lydgate.  However, this is not the first time the introduction of new technology has effected reception, understanding, and interpretation of the poet.  The shift from manuscript to print spread Lydgate’s poems in numbers that were not possible before, while modern editorial practices developed during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries have created a set of “standard” editions of the poet’s works, for good and ill.

 

Material Lydgate (Kalamazoo 2017)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 10:50am
Lydgate Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Medieval studies has made serious inroads into inquiries surrounding the relationship between objects and environments, between objects and their spiritual power, as well as between descriptions of objects and their literal presence. These issues also pertain to Lydgate studies, as his relationship with matter is complex. As Lisa H.

[UPDATED] 21st Century Englishes Conference CFP

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 10:50am
Bowling Green State University, Dept. of English
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 19, 2016

The 21st Century Englishes Conference Planning Committee is happy to announce we have extended our Call for Papers submission deadline to Friday, August 19, 2016. There is still time to submit a proposal for this year’s conference. Please send proposals and questions to bgsucon@gmail.com.

Call for Papers

21st Century Englishes Graduate Student Conference, sponsored by the Rhetoric Society of the Black Swamp, the BGSU Student Chapter of the Rhetoric Society of America

Date: Saturday, October 15, 2016

Location: Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH

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