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Filling the Vacuum of Space and Time in Eighteenth Century - Due September 15

updated: 
Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 3:45pm
ASECS Panel - Brian Tatum

Scientific discoveries in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries led to a revolution in the epistemology of space and time as intellectuals such as Anna Barbauld and Thomas Wright expanded the scope of these concepts to infinite or nearly infinite regions. Proposals about the infinite size of the universe and the discovery of deep time created a vacuum that philosophers and writers quickly tried to fill. This led to expansion both in content and form of literary texts. This panel seeks to explore the connection between eighteenth-century scientific advancements and literature.

This panel welcomes papers interested in exploring these or related topics:

Literary History and Life Writing: The Development of Nonfiction in the Eighteenth Century

updated: 
Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 3:38pm
American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies panel

This panel will investigate the emergence of life writing in the eighteenth century and consider the ways in which genres of life writing work in relation to literary history and canon formation. From Colley Cibber's An Apologie for the Life of Colley Cibber to William Mason's The Life and Letters of Thomas Gray to Jean-Jacques Rousseau's The Confessions to Samuel Johnson's Lives of the Poets, life writing in the century took many different forms. These and other writers of autobiography and biography used new nonfiction genres to respond to harsh criticism of their work, defend particular genres from criticism, memorialize literary heroes, defend a set of literary genres, and begin to create what later became the literary canon.

NeMLA panel: Translation and Spirituality. March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 12:57pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (2016 convention)

The study of translation systems as a central mode of inquiry into a culture's literary history has led to fascinating case studies in the growth, destabilization, and/or renewal of religious and political ideologies, particularly in non-European and postcolonial contexts. The use and visibility of translation as a transformative force (both in terms of politics and poetics) encourages us to conceive of translation as an endeavor with a distinctly spiritual dimension--an act that embodies the rhetoric of renewal, rebirth, and revival.

[UPDATE] Toy Story at 20 conference

updated: 
Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 11:40am
Toy Story at 20 / University of Sunderland

Registration is now open for Toy Story at 20.

The conference officially begins at the Tyneside Cinema in Newcastle on the evening of Thursday 12th November, with a special screening of Toy Story followed by Professor Paul Wells' keynote address. The programme of papers and panels on Friday 13th November will take place at the University of Sunderland's David Puttnam Media Centre, at St Peter's Campus on the banks of the River Wear in Sunderland. For more information, please visit the conference website:

https://toystoryat20.wordpress.com.

[UPDATE - Deadline 01/09/2015] Reading Risk in Contemporary U.S. Fiction and Culture

updated: 
Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 4:56am
A Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher Colloquium, University of Birminham

Five days after 9/11, Republican Party activist James Pinkerton proclaimed that 'the World Trade Center has been destroyed, but this has also been a crushing defeat for irony, cynicism and hipness. Here in New York, the city that gave the world Seinfeld, Sex and the City and Studio 54, the victors now are sincerity, patriotism and earnestness' (Newsday, September 16th, 2001). Has Pinkerton's claim come true? If traditional values like sincerity, patriotism and earnestness are ascendant, what space is left for texts that risk to contest or query the status-quo? Should we abhor risk as the cause of the financial crash, or pine for risky artistic practices that might instigate change? Do we need the texts we study to be risky?

Forgotten Books and Cultural Memory, May 27–28 2016, Abstracts due February 1, 2016

updated: 
Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 3:21am
Taipei Tech Department of English (National Taipei University of Technology)

Literary history is full of forgetting—both forced and natural. Manuscripts and books have been forgotten as a result of conquest, language changes, and politics. Other texts have been forgotten due to their physical condition: sole manuscripts are hidden away in archives, libraries burn, and paper disintegrates. Many medieval texts that are now central to the English literary canon, such as Beowulf, Piers Plowman, and the Book of Margery Kempe, were virtually unknown until the nineteenth, or even twentieth centuries. Later texts, from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, have been forgotten due to changes in taste, to their originally ephemeral nature, or to the sheer quantity of works that were published.

[REMINDER] Use, Abuse, Abstinence: Reading Alcohol in Literature | NEMLA 2016, March 17-20 | Submission Deadline Sept. 30, 2015

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2015 - 5:30pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel calls for papers that stake a claim in the cultural significance of representing alcohol or alcohol consumption. How do these representations relate to alcoholism as a disease and the alcoholic as an identity category? Does the text evaluate alcohol abuse morally or politically? Do communities organized around alcohol consumption facilitate social movements based on class, race, sexuality, or gender?

What Is the State of the Humanities Today? Abstracts due Sept 30 2015; Full Articles January 15, 2016

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2015 - 3:49pm
The Rendezvous Journal of Arts and Letters, Idaho State University

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Rendezvous: Journal of Arts and Letters
Volume 43, Numbers 1 & 2
The Rendezvous Journal of Arts and Letters invites submissions for an upcoming issue that addresses the current state of the humanities and humanities education in colleges and universities in the United States.

Submissions may take the form of scholarly articles, reviews, or creative works (e.g., poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, art work). Provision may also be made for a select number of digital and multimedia works.

What Is the State of the Humanities Today?

In Defining the Humanities, Robert Proctor states:

CFP: Native American Literature (47th Annual CEA Conference, March 31-April 2, 2016, Denver, CO)

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2015 - 3:29pm
Benjamin Carson / Bridgewater State University

Call for Papers, CEA 2016

Conference Theme: creation

47th Annual Conference | March 31-April 2, 2016 | Denver, CO

Native American Literature Panel(s)

This year's conference theme is particularly relevant to Native American/Indigenous/First Nations peoples. While all topics related to Indigenous literatures will be considered, including Indigenous poetics, Indigenous rhetorics, as well as issues of sovereignty, separatism, and transnationalism, papers that address the conference theme will be especially welcome.

Proposals will be accepted online at www.cea-web.org beginning August 15,
2015.

Submission deadline: November 1, 2015

Call for Undergrad Work on Disabilities/Abilities

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2015 - 3:16pm
Queen City Writers journal

Queen City Writers, a refereed journal of undergraduate writing and multimedia composing, seeks submissions that speak to issues of disabilities/abilities for an upcoming issue.
Possible questions and issues to consider include, but are not limited to:
• After 25 years, how has the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 impacted or changed the rhetoric of disability in American culture?
• How do disabilities interact with writing processes? How should or do writing classrooms and/or writing centers address disabilities in meaningful ways?
• In what ways does attention to disability benefit everyone, not just persons with disabilities?

Graduate Journal aspeers Calls for Papers on "American Youth" by 18 Oct 2015

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2015 - 12:58pm
aspeers: emerging voices in american studies

When Theodore Roosevelt spoke of America as a "young giant of the West," a "nation glorious in youth and strength," at the Republican National Convention in 1900, he inserted himself into a long rhetorical tradition: Whether in promise or in criticism, identifying 'youth' with America and calling the US a nation that is yet to grow up constitutes a well-established trope in discussions of 'Americanness.' At the same time, adolescence and youth are core concepts at the heart of American literature and culture, and they are at the center of many contemporary debates.

Moms Reclaim Rhetoric: Call for Submissions for Site to Launch in December

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2015 - 12:16pm
Carolyn Buonomo

Submissions are invited for a site to launch in December that aims to reclaim the rhetoric used to shape the public's perception of pregnant teens and young mothers. While this site will serve as a resource and as a community for pregnant teens and young mothers, its audience is also the general public, as its primary purpose is to help change the detrimental ways in which these pregnant teens and young mothers are often perceived as a result of how they're portrayed by the popular media and in teen pregnancy prevention campaigns, like the one produced by the Candie's Foundation.

CFP: Computer Culture (SWPACA Conference, February 10-13, 2016)

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2015 - 10:18am
Natasha Chuk / SWPACA

37th Annual Conference
Southwest Popular / American Culture Association
COMPUTER CULTURE AREA
February 10-13, 2016
Hyatt Regency, Albuquerque, NM
www.southwestpca.org

PROPOSAL SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Sunday, November 1, 2015

Proposals for papers are now being accepted for the area of Computer Culture, as one of the many areas within the 37th annual conference of the Southwest Popular/American Culture Association (SWPACA). Please consider submitting.

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