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gender studies and sexuality

LGBTQ Comics Studies Reader (University of Mississippi Press)

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 9:27am
Professors Alison Halsall and Jonathan Warren
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

Critical scholarship of comics, cartoons, and graphic narratives has been a burgeoning field in research and debate for at least the last twenty-five years. Amid such scholarly richness, LGBTQ comics criticism and scholarly attention to LGBTQ comics and cartoons is at least keeping pace with a field within which it is still negotiating its position.

**Deadline Approaching** CfP: Queerness and Horror Fiction Panel

updated: 
Wednesday, September 26, 2018 - 12:53pm
Coco d'Hont
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

British Association for American Studies Annual Conference, University of Sussex 25-27 April 2019

In celebration of the fiftieth birthday of the Stonewall riots, this panel explores the intersections between queerness and horror fiction. Despite the progress made in the past few decades, recent events such as President Trump’s proposed transgender military ban mean that LGBTQ+ rights are anything but a given in the current political climate. This makes the critical study of queerness and its fictional representations more urgent than ever before.

Families on Screen in the Americas Since 1970

updated: 
Friday, September 21, 2018 - 6:03pm
Congrès de l'Institut des Amériques - Panel 10
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 22, 2018

International Conference: Congrès de l'Institut des Amériques (9-11 October 2019, Paris)

Panel 10: Families on Screen in the Americas Since 1970

Women and the Natural World in Medieval Literature

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Olivia Colquitt / Leeds IMC 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 24, 2018

This series of sessions proposes to explore the multifarious relationships between women and the natural world in medieval literature. We invite abstracts for papers on medieval texts of any language, genre, and period across the global Middle Ages. We particularly welcome submissions from doctoral candidates, early career researchers, and independent scholars. After receiving all submissions, papers will be organised into a number of linked sessions focussing on more specific topics within the overarching theme of women and the natural world.

Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to:

Pedagogy: Considering Diversity in the English Curriculum

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:23am
Charles A. S. Ernst / College English Association, New Orleans Conf., 3/28-30/19, https://www.conftool.pro/cea2019
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

250- to 500-word proposals, with title, for 15-minute papers/presentations on pedagogical considerations of diversity issues in the English curriculum.  Papers should address topics like the following:  curricular concerns and imaginative solutions to the development of courses treating ethnic literatures, spiritual orientations, and/or gender-identity readings; selection of materials and modes of presentation; multicultural vs.

Pedagogy: Service Learning in English Courses—Composition and Literature: New Ideas for Relevant Service Learning Components

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:23am
Charles A. S. Ernst / College English Association, New Orleans Conf., 3/28-30/19, https://www.conftool.pro/cea2019
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

250- to 500-word proposals, with title, for 15-minute papers/presentations on the pedagogical use of service learning in composition or literature courses.  Papers should address issues like the following:  Determining whether service learning projects—and what kinds—are appropriate to course material; matching key components of one’s English course with appropriate service learning projects; establishing relations with off-campus service learning entities; framing project assignments that enhance service learning while maintaining course content integrity; developing an assessment model to measure outcomes.  How many different service learning projects within an English course?  How long should such projects be?  Level of difficulty?  Challenges, risks,

Pedagogy--Stimulating Awareness, Provoking Engagement: Metacognition, Active Learning, & Supportive Technology in the Literature or Composition Classroom

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:23am
Charles A. S. Ernst / College English Association, New Orleans Conf., 3/28-30/19, https://www.conftool.pro/cea2019
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

250- to 500-word proposals, with title, for 15-minute papers/presentations treating pedagogy on the use of metacognition strategies in the context of active learning & appropriate technological support in teaching literature or composition in classroom settings.  Metacognition encompasses “learning how we learn” activities and techniques.  Active learning presumes learner-based instruction, and may include problem-based learning, inquiry-based learning, collaborative learning, or other forms of active learning, including the use of technology—PowerPoint, SmartBoards, student response systems, Smartphones, IPhones, IPads, IPods, social media (e.g., YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat), whether in F2F, online, or hybrid courses.

George Eliot at 200

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:22am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Middlemarch ends by praising those “who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.” This was not, of course, the fate of the novel’s author. Born in 1819, George Eliot became one of the best-known writers of Victorian England. In addition to her novels, Eliot wrote on social and religious questions, translated German philosophy and criticism, and lived in an at-the-time scandalous relationship with fellow writer George Henry Lewes. Few regarded Eliot with indifference: Nietzsche called her a “little moralistic female;” Trollope complained that she was “obscure from her too great desire to be pungent;” Woolf said that she created “one of the few English novels written for grown-up people.”

ACLA 2019: The Infinite Freak: Global (De)constructing of Aberration

updated: 
Thursday, September 6, 2018 - 9:29am
ACLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 19, 2018

The amount of scholarly literature devoted to the subject of “freaks” is grossly inconsistent with the volume of its uses. The term bears notoriously obscure and contradictory meaning, simultaneously natural and unnatural, common and uncommon, derogatory and complimentary, mythic and empirically determined, strange and familiar, cosmic and socially constructed. In speaking about “freaks” the scholar might feel compelled to substitute the term with one of its many aliases, such as “otherness,” “abnormal,” “alterity,” “anomalous,” or “divergent” but these synonyms impose limits exceeded by the uses of the term, “freaks.” This panel engages in the multiplicity of meaning, condition and consequence inherent in the subject of freaks.

Activism, Advocacy, and the Archive (Panel)

updated: 
Thursday, September 6, 2018 - 9:26am
NeMLA 2018 50th Anniversary Convention Washington DC
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

While historical and literary archives have long been integral to the study of the humanities, they are more than simple repositories for historical artifacts. They don’t just preserve works and fragments to be studied, they help us, as scholars, to actively engage in the public sphere. As Randall C. Jimerson notes “Archivists can use the power of archives to promote accountability, open government, diversity, and social justice.” In doing so, archivists can democratize information and open up new avenues of knowing by employing ethical and objective—but not neutral—strategies. This can be especially important for subjugated communities, who’s histories and cultures have been bound and kept distinct.

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