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humanities computing and the internet

Past Forward: New Ways of Looking at Old Things

updated: 
Monday, August 19, 2019 - 11:08am
The Medieval Studies Institute, Indiana University Bloomington
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 4, 2019

CFP: Past Forward: New Ways of Looking at Old Things

MEST Symposium, Indiana University Bloomington

March 6-7, 2020

 

Keynote: Dr. Michelle Warren (Dartmouth College)

 

 

Proposals for 20-minute papers should be submitted to iumestsymposium@gmail.com by October 4, 2019.

 

 

Synergies: Bridging the Gap Between Traditional and Digital Literary Studies

updated: 
Friday, August 16, 2019 - 11:05am
Network for Digital Literary Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Synergies

Bridging the Gap Between Traditional and Digital Literary Studies

University of Southern Denmark, Odense, May 4-6, 2020

Organized by the Network for Digital Literary Studies

 

Confirmed keynotes: Ted Underwood (US), Fotis Jannidis (D), Nina Tahmasebi (S), Katie Muth (GB) and Richard

Jean So (US).

Confirmed moderator: Franco Moretti (I).

 

The Network for Digital Literary Studies invites submissions for the conference Synergies: Bridging the Gap Between

2019 China New Media Communication Association Annual Conference

updated: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019 - 3:24am
Junbin Su / Xiamen University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 25, 2019

A New Era, New Media, and a New Silk Road

2019 China New Media Communication Association Annual Conference

2019 中国新媒体传播学年会

November 23-24, 2019   |   Xiamen, China

Organized by Xiamen University School of Journalism and Communication

NEMLA 2020- Imagining a Future for Humanities Pedagogy

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 3:03pm
William Bowden/ University of Rhode Island
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In his book Twenty-One Lessons for the Twenty-First Century (2018), Yuval Noah Harari argues that in a world where Biotechnology and Artificial Intelligence (AI) are merging to redesign human life (physically and socially), educators should focus on teaching the "four C's," which are, "Critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity" (266). As intelligent algorithms increasingly replace human labor, Harari argues that the job market will require workers to "reinvent yourself again and again."

Video games and adaptation

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:53pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel of the 2020 NeMLA convention (Boston, March 5-8) welcomes reflections on the process of adapting texts / films / graphic novels into video games, being open to theoretical analyses as well as to case studies (for example, of the narrative ecosystem of franchises). It seeks to bring together the most popular approaches to studying the medium -- narratological and ludological perspectives, as well as reflections on the translation of cinematic adaptation theory to the medium of video games – in order to ensure a rich conversation.

The Ludic Outlaw: Medievalism, Games, Sport, and Play (A Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:37pm
International Association for Robin Hood Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS), Kalamazoo 2020
     

Cross-platform video games are now so popular as to constitute a financial threat to Netflix and other digital content services. One feature of many of these games is the ludic outlaw figure—found, for example, in the 2016 multiplayer Overwatch—that works to resist oppression within the game world. Because they signify popular definitions of justice and communal welfare, modern digital outlaws frequently evoke medieval outlaw representations, such as Robin Hood. In what specific ways do enduring medieval outlaw tropes function as model responses to oppression in modern games?

Call for Journal Articles—Queerness in the Digital Age

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:37pm
Tom Welch, The Velvet Light Trap (University of Wisconsin—Madison)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

Queer Media and the Digital

Digital technology has altered all aspects of media cultures, including questions of identity that can affect everything from the production of texts, their content, their distribution, their reception, and more. At the same time, popular and academic understandings of queerness have evolved to incorporate expanding ideas of gender, sexuality, race, disability, ethnicity, and other identity categories. Not only has digital technology altered the ways in which queerness can be articulated, but queer media has also shaped the form and reception of digital texts. Understanding queerness in the digital age requires us to account for the changes in both queer studies and digital studies.

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