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Call for Papers: Yoga Justice/Yoga Violence

updated: 
Monday, January 9, 2017 - 12:47pm
Race and Yoga
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Call for Papers: Race and Yoga Journal 2.1 (2017)

 

Yoga can be a tool to promote social justice. Yet, it can also be used to perpetuate violence and oppression. This themed issue of Race and Yoga invites a critical examination of justice and violence in yoga communities. What is yoga justice? How is “justice” defined and by whom? How do we rethink narratives that promote justice through yoga? Conversely, what kinds of violence occur in yoga spaces? How are people responding and/or resisting forms of yoga violence?

 

Practical Approaches to Teaching Literature

updated: 
Monday, January 9, 2017 - 1:05pm
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Talks on any aspect of the session topic are welcome: models, tips, strategies for teaching literature (English, American, world, other). Come share what's working in your classroom. This is a fun panel with great energy and enthusiasm.

Please send a 250 word proposal and a brief bio by March 1 to Dr. Eric Meljac at emeljac@wtamu.edu.

For more information about the conference, check out the general CFP http://www.rmmla.org.

The 2017 Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association Conference will be held in Spokane, Washington, on October 12-14, 2017.

Harf – A Journal of South Asian Studies (Volume Two)

updated: 
Tuesday, January 17, 2017 - 10:29am
Harf – A Journal of South Asian Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Harf: A Journal of South Asian Studies invites academic work from undergraduate and graduate students working on South Asia. We are a new journal published out of McGill University in Montreal. We welcome all submissions pertaining to the anthropology, history, literatures, and religions of South Asia. We are interested, particularly, in essays that explore marginalized voices, communities, practices, and concepts. Submissions must be double-spaced and 15-30 pages in length, inclusive of all endnotes, footnotes, and bibliography. Submissions must be formatted according to the Chicago Manual of Style as per the notes and bibliography system.

Cohen-Dylan Special Issue

updated: 
Monday, January 9, 2017 - 1:32pm
Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, February 15, 2017

We are inviting articles on the Focus Area and the General Areas for the Vol. IX, No. 1, 2017.Focus Area: “Cohen-Dylan”

We are inviting critical articles on the lives, works and times of Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan.

To be guest-edited by

Prof. Sudev Pratim Basu, Ph D
Associate Professor of English, Department of English & Modern European Languages, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan.

Details at http://rupkatha.com/callforpapers.php

General Areas:

Papers can be submitted on any topic on,

Announcement: CFP for Issue #1 of The Journal of David Foster Wallace Studies

updated: 
Monday, January 9, 2017 - 1:36pm
The International David Foster Wallace Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 30, 2017

The Journal of David Foster Wallace Studies

Call for Papers:

Published by The International David Foster Wallace Society, The Journal of David Foster Wallace Studies is a double-blind, peer-reviewed print journal aimed at the international academic and professional communities engaged with Wallace’s work. The goal of the journal is to publish the most recent scholarship in the development of Wallace Studies and to encourage and identify new lines of inquiry for the discipline.

14th Annual MEGAA Symposium: Borders, Boundaries, Beliefs

updated: 
Monday, January 9, 2017 - 1:35pm
Miami University English Graduate and Adjunct Association (MEGAA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, February 5, 2017

14th Annual Miami University English Graduate and Adjunct Association (MEGAA) Symposium

Borders, Boundaries, Beliefs

Friday, March 10, 2017 — Oxford, Ohio

 

“Living on borders and in margins, keeping intact one's shifting and multiple identity and integrity, is like trying to swim in a new element, an 'alien' element.”

        -- Gloria Anzaldua,

        Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza

 

Ethnic Tourism and Slumming in American Literature

updated: 
Monday, January 9, 2017 - 1:28pm
American Literature Association (ALA) 28th Annual Conference May 25-28, 2017, Boston, MA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 16, 2017

This proposed panel will attempt to collect perspectives about literary tourism, particularly regarding immigrant and ethnic communities from the nineteenth century to the present. The late 1830s and early 1840s marked the beginning of the tourist industry in North America, particularly in the Northeast United States. Representing the scores of European travelers upon his tour of the United States in 1842, Charles Dickens wrote about the visual splendor of Boston’s private houses, the State House, the Boston Common, and its immigrant populations. New York City, meanwhile, welcomed nearly 70,000 tourists annually by the mid 1830s, as travelers visited Manhattan’s noted parks and churches as well as its hidden slums.

Contemporary Visual Cultures in South Asia

updated: 
Monday, January 9, 2017 - 1:36pm
Amrita Ajay, University of Delhi
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Call for Papers

Contemporary Visual Cultures in South Asia

 

Submission Deadline: 28th February 2017

 

Editors: Amrita Ajay, University of Delhi

               E-mail – amritaxajay@gmail.com

              

               Samarth Singhal, University of Delhi

               E-mail – samarth864@gmail.com

 

CFP for MSA 19: Modernism and/as Refuge

updated: 
Monday, January 9, 2017 - 12:34pm
University of Essex
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, January 12, 2017

Refuge, as a condition of displacement, seeking place, and placement, and the experience of moving oneself from a position of real or perceived harm to a position of real or perceived safety, interacts in complex and illuminating ways with perceptions of home and homelessness, belonging, citizenship, state and statelessness, personhood, language, loss, as well as with everyday practices and modes of dwelling, and the emotional and cognitive strategies used to configure the past, the present, and the future. Prompted by real historical transformations and mass displacements on an unprecedented scale, the notion/condition of refuge operated vigorously, if ambivalently, in the late nineteenth and the first half of the twentieth century.

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