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Systematized Objects: the other "world" literature [systems theory, ANT, OOO, posthumanism, etc.]; ACLA April 1-3; due Nov 12

updated: 
Sunday, October 17, 2010 - 8:26pm
Meredith Farmer and David Baker

Currently, a number of analysts are thinking about what constitutes, assembles, or traces "objects." While Bruno Latour (2005), Manuel DeLanda (2006), Andy Clark (2008), Graham Harman (2009), Cary Wolfe (2010), et al. might not agree on what objects "are," they're all interested in shifting away from the transcendental ego in ways that evade the "modern constitution" or the "bifurcation of nature." And we're interested in how this move -- and all its concomitant effects -- might influence not literary theory, but literary criticism.

Assembling Among Assemblages: Corporate Forms and American Literature Before 1914

updated: 
Sunday, October 17, 2010 - 6:20pm
Brynnar Swenson, Butler University; Andrew Lyndon Knighton, California State University, Los Angeles


Gilles Deleuze defines an assemblage as a multiplicity that "is made up of many heterogeneous terms and which establishes liaisons, relations between them, across ages, sexes and reigns — different natures." Such a form of organization, he argues, is the product of the interactions between the various bodies — physical, psychical, social, economic, linguistic — that compose it. The inherent dynamism of the assemblage is mirrored in the work of those who have theorized it; the concept remains notoriously diffuse and unstable. Following Manuel DeLanda's recent work, we are eager to reconstruct and refine assemblage theory.

CFP: Adaptation as Process (2011 ACA/PCA Conference-San Antonio): 4/20/11-4/23/11

updated: 
Sunday, October 17, 2010 - 4:37pm
Southwest/Texas Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Joint Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS in ADAPTATION

The Adaptation Section of the 2011 National Popular Culture & American Culture Associations Conference

Wednesday, April 20, through Saturday, April 23
Marriot Rivercenter San Antonio, and Marriot-San Antonio Riverwalk

Proposal deadline—December 8th, 2010

Adaptation as Process

INCS Conference 2011: Special Thread on 19th-C Science (cfp deadline Nov 15, 2010)

updated: 
Sunday, October 17, 2010 - 4:09pm
Interdisciplinary Nineteenth Century Studies


SPEAKING NATURE
Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Conference
Mar 31-Apr 3, 2011 at Pitzer College, CA

SPECIAL THREAD ON NINETEENTH-CENTURY SCIENCE

How did nineteenth century science conceive, construct, and represent the physical world? In what ways did science shape—in what ways was science shaped by—other discourses of the nineteenth century?

Textos Híbridos: Call for audio or visual media for first issue on Carlos Monsiváis

updated: 
Sunday, October 17, 2010 - 11:51am
Textos Híbridos. Revista de estudios sobre la crónica latinoamericana

CALL FOR AUDIO OR VISUAL MEDIA
FOR ISSUE ON CARLOS MONSIVÁIS

Textos Híbridos, a new electronic journal dedicated to the study of the Latin American chronicle from the Conquest to the present day, invites the submission of audio or visual material for its inaugural issue on renowned Mexican cronista and cultural critic Carlos Monsiváis. A prolific and iconic chronicler, Monsiváis is known for his anthologies of chronicles such as Amor perdido (1977), Entrada libre (1987), and Apocalipstick (2009) as well as his studies on the genre and edited collections such as A ustedes les consta. Antología de la crónica en México (1980; 2006).

Collective Identities: Policies and Poetics Feb. 18 2011

updated: 
Sunday, October 17, 2010 - 11:35am
CUNY Graduate Center PhD Program in French

"[A] mode of writing is an act of historical solidarity…it is the relationship between creation and society, the literary language transformed by its social finality, form considered as human intention and thus linked to the great crises of History." - Roland Barthes

Traffic in Translation: the Task of Derrida and Deleuze (ACLA, Vancouver, March 31-April 3, 2011)

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 11:37pm
Yen-Chen Chuang, Tamkang University

This seminar seeks papers focusing on the theory of translation from the perspectives of Derrida or Deleuze. Is translation an impossible task, an ethics that lends an ear to the other? Or is translation a matter of creative concepts? How do we develop the idea of (in)fidelity in terms of the strange friendship between the two philosophers? What is the relationship between linguistic signs and recognition/the unrecognizable? Possible paper topics may include but are not limited to:

Traffic in Translation: the Task of Derrida and Deleuze (ACLA, March 31-April 3, 2011)

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 10:42pm
Yen-Chen Chuang, Tamkang University

This seminar seeks papers focusing on the theory of translation from the perspectives of Derrida or Deleuze. Is translation an impossible task, an ethics that lends an ear to the other? Or is translation a matter of creative concepts? How do we develop the idea of (in)fidelity in terms of the strange friendship between the two philosophers? What is the relationship between linguistic signs and recognition/the unrecognizable? Possible paper topics may include but not limited to:

American Literature as World Literature: Making/Mapping New Worlds, ACLA 2011 Seminar, Vancouver, March 31-April 3

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 7:18pm
Lindsey Andrews, Duke University; Michelle Koerner, Duke University

How has American literature understood itself as "world literature"? This seminar is interested not only in the ways American literature "contains" the world (as a multi-national literature) but also in the ways American literature is in the world. We want to think of World Literature not only as a category that describes multi-national or global literatures, but also as a literary and political strategy: the making of new worlds.

Oklahoma State University English Graduate Conference

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 7:07pm
Oklahoma State University English Graduate Students Association

The English Graduate Student Association (EGSA) at Oklahoma State University, an organization of English graduate students and faculty members committed to promoting student academic development and scholastic achievement, is currently accepting proposals for its annual graduate conference March 4-5 2011 in Stillwater, OK.

CFP: Eliot at the American Literature Association, May 26-29, 2011

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 6:21pm
T. S. Eliot Society

CFP: Eliot at the American Literature Association

The T. S. Eliot Society will sponsor two sessions at the 2011 annual conference of the American Literature Association, May 26-29, at the Westin Copley Place in Boston. Please send proposals or abstracts (up to 250 words), along with a brief biography or curriculum vitae, to Professor Nancy K. Gish (ngish@usm.maine.edu). Submissions must be received no later than January 15, 2011.

For information on the ALA and its 2011 conference, please see http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/english/ala2.

Vexillum: An Undergraduate Journal

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 2:43pm
Vexillum Undergraduate Journal of Classical and Medieval Studies

"Vexillum" is an undergraduate journal that supports and promotes undergraduate scholarship in the fields of Classical and Medieval Studies, and accepts scholarly essays by undergraduate students written on a wide range of topics, including but not limited to: history, literature, philosophy, archaeology, art history, sociology, philology, and linguistics. "Vexillum" provides a unique opportunity for undergraduate students to submit outstanding papers for peer review from other undergraduates, an opportunity rarely achieved in the undergraduate years.

Critical Expressivist Practices in the College Writing Classroom [500-1000 word proposals by January 15, 2011]

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 12:18pm
Roseanne Gatto & Tara Roeder, St. John's University

The term expressivism has fallen out of favor with many composition scholars in the past few decades. As social constructivist approaches to composition studies become increasingly common, the old myths about expressivism (e.g. it's solipsistic; it privileges the self over the social; it's apolitical) persist. But are the two movements actually antithetical?

[UPDATE] The Politics and Aesthetics of Global Waste (ASLE, June 21-26 2011)

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 12:12pm
Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment



The Politics and Aesthetics of Global Waste
Panel Proposal | Ninth ASLE Biennial Conference
June 21-26, 2011 | Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana

Updated Abstract Deadline: October 29th, 2010

Despite pressing concerns about diminishing resources, garbage continues to accumulate in landfills, oceans, and toxic sites. Although the international waste trade is booming, those peripheral to the world economy—slumdwellers, rural poor, refugees—find themselves reduced to the status of the detritus in which they often live and work.

Rattle Journal - A Journal at the convergence of Art and Writing

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 10:22am
Rattle Journal (UK)

Call for short critical and theoretical work on Art, Writing and Visual Cultures.

Rattle is a journal of art, writing, and thought. It offers a speculative space for the text-image relationship to develop, as well as representing those moments of thought and work not easily recuperated into the mainstreams of practice.

Work may include, but is by no means limited to, theoretical and critical writing, page based artworks, reviews, fictions and poetry. We encourage the submission of interesting and unusual work regardless of its form or subject.

Proposals are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed before receiving finished work.

German Romanticism and its Fates in World Literature (ACLA, Vancouver, March 31-April 3, 2011)

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 12:58am
Hiroki Yoshikuni, University of Tokyo; Matthew H. Anderson, SUNY Buffalo

This seminar seeks to examine world literature in the wake of German Romanticism. German Romanticism has often been seen as a response to a philosophical crisis that emerged from Kant's formulations of theoretical and practical reason. Because, from the standpoint of theoretical reason, phenomenal nature is always "contingent" and subordinated to the laws of causality, the world of nature is, by definition, not free. But Kant also maintains that freedom, in its resistance to phenomenal desires and causes, is the unique trait or mark of a humanity that is distinguished from animals and machines, though freedom itself cannot ever appear in nature, and thus cannot be theoretically known as such.

Globalization, Utopia, Film (ACLA March 31-April 3, 2011)

updated: 
Friday, October 15, 2010 - 9:02pm
ACLA

This seminar considers the production of narrative in post 1950 cinema as it relates to aesthetically and politically charged questions of globalization and the desires for Utopia.

2011 CLIFF: Fun & Games, March 24-26, 2011

updated: 
Friday, October 15, 2010 - 6:14pm
University of Michigan Comparative Literature Intra-Student Faculty Forum

CALL FOR PAPERS

15th annual Comparative Literature Intra-Student Faculty Forum (CLIFF)
March 24-26 2011
University of Michigan- Ann Arbor

*
Fun & Games

Keynote speaker:

Glenda Carpio
Professor of English & African and African American Studies
Harvard University
author of Laughing Fit to Kill: Black Humor in the Fictions of Slavery
*

The Projector: Film & Media Journal

updated: 
Friday, October 15, 2010 - 11:43am
The Projector: Film & Media Journal

The Projector is a peer-reviewed online journal dedicated to the study of the intersections between media and culture. We are currently seeking essays for our Spring 2011 and Fall 2011 issues. We are particularly interested in scholarship that engages in interdisciplinary analyses of media texts, including those that examine media from a cultural studies, political economy, qualitative audience research, industry analysis, feminist, queer theory, or critical race theory perspective. We invite essays that engage with theoretical debates in media and cultural studies, as well as those that engage in critical examinations of aesthetic practices. We are also interested in essays that examine alternatives to corporate media.

Slave: Witnessing the Voice through Testimony and Performance (24 November 2010)

updated: 
Friday, October 15, 2010 - 9:28am
University of Salford (UK)

The University of Salford and Feelgood Theatre Productions have teamed up to organise an interdisciplinary conference that will explore the various literary, cultural and societal questions raised by Feelgood's production of Slave – A Question of Freedom, adapted from Mende Nazer's critically acclaimed autobiography Slave (Virago). The conference will include contributions from a range of speakers including:

* Mende Nazer (author of Slave)
* Damien Lewis (documentary filmmaker and co-author of Slave)
* Caroline Clegg (director of Slave – A Question of Freedom)

CFP: Cosmopolitan Memory and Travelling Trauma (ACLA March 31-April 3, 2011)

updated: 
Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 10:07pm
Terri Tomsky, University of Alberta; Jennifer Bowering Delisle, McMaster University

When a collective memory of trauma transcends its directly affected community to be taken up by others, it can be said to be "cosmopolitan" (Levy and Sznaider) or "multidirectional" (Rothberg). The concept of a travelling or a genuinely "cosmopolitan" memory is compelling. Indeed, how a memory of trauma travels across cultures, and develops in time as a shared or borrowed memory is a topic that necessitates further discussion. Like Edward Said's notion of "travelling theory," the transition of a memory from a specific context into a new setting or across a transnational space has significant theoretical and pragmatic consequences.

American Identities on Stage: 20th Century American Drama International Postgraduate Conference

updated: 
Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 5:35pm
University of East Anglia, School of American Studies

University of East Anglia
School of American Studies

Celebrating 100 Years of Tennessee Williams (1911-2011)

American Identities on Stage:
20th Century American Drama International Postgraduate Conference

Call For Papers

To commemorate the Tennessee Williams's centennial, the School of American Studies at the University of East Anglia, will host a one-day international conference on 26 March 2011, focusing on theatrical representations of American identities. The invited keynote speaker is Professor Stephen Bottoms (University of Leeds).

The Middle Eastern City: Conflict and Modernity (ACLA 2011 Vancouver Mar 31 - Apr 3; Deadline Nov 12)

updated: 
Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 3:47pm
ACLA (American Comparative Literature Association)

The cities of the modern Middle East are marked, even defined, by conflict. From Istanbul to Cairo, Jerusalem/al-Quds to Beirut to Tehran, the city is the site where the ideological, ethnic, and religious divisions of the Middle East are crystallized in often violent confrontations. Recent history has shown the world relentless fighting over holy sites in Jerusalem/al-Quds, the Sabra and Shatila massacre, the assassination of Rafiq Hariri, the 2009 election protests and government reprisals in Tehran, and so on. Whatever one's political orientation, it is evident that the city is, alongside truth, the first casualty of such conflict.

[UPDATE]: First Seminar on the Narco-Imaginary (deadline for paper proposals Nov. 12)

updated: 
Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 1:50pm
ACLA 2011, Vancouver, B.C., Mar. 31-Apr. 3

Narcotics repeatedly emerge as central elements in the history of colonization and global capitalism. "Legal" or "illegal," state-sanctioned or unsanctioned, the drug trade is fundamental to numerous historical developments, from the European "discovery" of tobacco in the New World, to the Anglo-Chinese Wars over the opium trade, to the interventions of the United States in Vietnam, Laos, Afghanistan, Columbia, Panama, Nicaragua…

Penn Undergraduate Law Journal submissions due 10/25/2010

updated: 
Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 1:17pm
Penn Undergraduate Law Journal, created by John Marshall Pre-Law Honor Society

The Penn Undergraduate Law Journal is looking for submissions for its first issue! The Penn Undergraduate Law Journal is a new online academic journal created by the John Marshall Pre-Law Honor Society and dedicated to legal scholarship at the undergraduate level. We welcome submissions from students of ALL majors, provided that the submissions have a law-related focus.
We encourage articles that have been written by undergraduates within the last two years, especially papers submitted previously for courses in History, Political Science, Legal Studies, English, and other related disciplines.
All submissions are due by October 25th, 2010.

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