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international conferences

Re-evaluating the Pre-Raphaelites (MLA 2020)

updated: 
Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 10:34am
William Morris Society in the United States
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 1, 2019

The WMS is seeking submissions for the following guaranteed session for MLA 2020:

Arts and the City Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, January 8, 2019 - 6:02pm
Institute of English Studies, Karoli Gaspar University and The Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Philosophy
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 15, 2019

Call for Papers

Arts and the City

International Conference

23-24 May 2019, Budapest, Hungary
Károli Gáspár University & The Hungarian Academy of Sciences

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

ANDREW GIBSON, Royal Holloway, University of London

BERNARDINE EVARISTO, writer, London

(author of Lara, Soul Tourists, and Blonde Roots, among other novels)

NOÉMI SZÉCSI, writer, Budapest

(author of The Finno-Ugrian Vampire and Mandragora Street 7, among other novels)

Joyce "Afterlives" (North American James Joyce Symposium, Mexico City, Mexico; June 12-16)

updated: 
Thursday, January 3, 2019 - 9:27am
North American James Joyce Symposium, Mexico City, Mexico; June 12-16
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 15, 2019

CFP: Joyce "Afterlives" (North American James Joyce Symposium, Mexico City, Mexico; June 12-16)

 

Conference site: https://www.joycewithoutborders.com/

 

This panel will analyze how Joyce circulates in popular and literary culture (widely defined). Joyce appears in novels, music, cinema, television, etc; works by Michael Arlen, Kate Bush, and Richard Linklater, and shows like The Simpsons, constitute famous examples. Joyce’s image, name and aura are features of all kinds of objects, ranging from pubs to statues to merchandise like t-shirts and finger puppets.

 

The undisciplined discipline: challenges of Pop Cultural Studies

updated: 
Thursday, January 3, 2019 - 9:29am
Danièle ANDRE for the 2019 AFEA Symposium
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 28, 2019

AFEA Symposium: Discipline and indiscipline, University of Nantes, France, 22-24 May 2019

 

Popular Culture workshop:

"The undisciplined discipline: challenges of Pop Cultural Studies (USA/Canada)" 

Creative and Speculative Writing in Cultural History

updated: 
Thursday, January 3, 2019 - 9:38am
International Society of Cultural History
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, January 10, 2019

Call for papers: Creative and Speculative Writing in Cultural History

Proposed panel for the International Society for Cultural History (26-29 June 2019)

Tallinn, Estonia

 

What is the place of creative and speculative writing in history? Are these distinct or related practices? Should one or both be employed? What are the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of writing history creatively or speculatively? What ethical issues do each of these modes of history writing raise?

GFF 2019: The Romantic Fantastic

updated: 
Thursday, January 3, 2019 - 8:54am
Gesellschaft für Fantastikforschung
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, February 28, 2019

10. Annual Conference of the Gesellschaft für Fantastikforschung: Das Romantisch-Fantastische – The Romantic Fantastic 


September 18th–23rd, 2019 at the Free University of Berlin, Cinepoetics - Center for Advanced Film Studies and Department of Film Studies 

Utopia, Dystopia and Climate Change: 20th International Conference of the Utopian Studies Society, Europe

updated: 
Thursday, December 20, 2018 - 10:45am
Utopian Studies Society, Europe
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, January 31, 2019

Despite the incidence of climate change scepticism amongst right-wing politicians in the United States and elsewhere, there is a near-consensus amongst scientists that current levels of atmospheric greenhouse gas are sufficient to alter global weather patterns to possibly disastrous effect. Writing in the journal Utopian Studies in 2016, the Californian science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson observed that: "Climate change is inevitable - we’re already in it - and because we’re caught in technological and cultural path dependency, we can’t easily get back out of it ...

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