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journals and collections of essays

Women and their Words: The Rhetoric of the 2020 U.S. Presidential Election Campaign

updated: 
Monday, August 19, 2019 - 11:20am
Michele Lockhart, PhD
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Michele Lockhart seeks contributors for her fifth collection of essays, which will analyze the language used by female candidates as they vie to be the 46th President of the United States and first female President of the United States.

Antipodes (Academic Journal)

updated: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019 - 9:20am
A Global Journal of Australian/New Zealand Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 15, 2019

Antipodes is actively seeking submissions of critical essays, poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction.  This American-based academic journal publishes scholarly essays on a variety of literary and cultural topics with a focus on Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand by international scholars. The journal also publishes creative works by writers from Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand.

Essays in literature, culture, film, and theatre are welcome from all scholars. Indigenous scholars and writers are particularly encouraged to submit essays and creative works. Work can be submitted at any time for consideration of publication in two issues per year.

Special Issue: Place, Space, and the Detective Narrative

updated: 
Wednesday, August 14, 2019 - 11:43am
The Journal of Popular Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 1, 2020

Special issue title: Place, Space, and the Detective Narrative
Issue editors: Dr. Malcah Effron (MIT) and Dr. Nicole Kenley (Baylor University)

Edited Collection: RuPedagogies of Realness: Teaching and Learning in RuPaul’s Drag Race and its Paratextual Cultures

updated: 
Tuesday, August 13, 2019 - 9:05am
Lindsay Bryde/Tommy Mayberry
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Edited Collection scheduled for publication with McFarland

Eds. Lindsay Bryde (Mandl School, the College of Applied Health) and Tommy Mayberry (University of Guelph)

“[Drag queens] ‘mother’ one another, ‘house’ one another, ‘rear’ one another, and the resignification of the family through these terms is not a vain or useless imitation, but the social and discursive building of community, a community that binds, cares, and teaches, that shelters and enables.” (137)

Call for Papers - Bulgarian Studies Journal

updated: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 11:21am
Bulgarian Studies Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Call for Papers
Bulgarian Studies Journal

Bulgarian Studies (ISSN 2638-9754) is an annual online peer-edited journal that includes content related to the study of Bulgaria and its culture. 

Approaches to Teaching Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

updated: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 11:54am
Lynn Domina
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl is one of the most frequently taught texts—it appears on syllabi for American literature, African American literature, American history, life writing, and gender or women’s studies courses. It is taught in high schools as well as in colleges and universities. Yet, very few resources are currently available for instructors.

Special Issue on Contemporary Film & Media Industries

updated: 
Friday, August 9, 2019 - 12:22pm
The Projector: A Journal on Film, Media, and Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 1, 2020

The Projector is developing a special issue for research articles that examine industrial and institutional developments in film, television, streaming, and/or gaming. The research, which will illuminate production and/or reception factors, could consider changes or events in the US market, national/regional sectors, or the global domain.

The political economy and/or reception studies research will not focus on interpretation or ideological assessment of an individual text. However, the research projects could effectively incorporate critical race theory, postcolonial studies, research on Hollywood hegemony, or other scholarship concerning social realities and identity politics.    

Art as Liberation in the Black Fantastic

updated: 
Monday, August 19, 2019 - 7:21pm
Third Stone Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 30, 2019

Across the African diaspora, art was a form of expression and liberation at times of widespread cultural oppression, enabling artists of color to resist the tradition of silencing while preserving their histories, traditions, and more in ways that could be passed down intergenerationally. While much art worked to fulfill a political purpose by pushing for equality and liberty in oppressive cultures, other works aimed at achieving liberation by way of celebrating Black cultural forms, from the cutting-edge music of Erykah Badu to that of Janelle Monae.

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