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How to Approach the Epic Genre in the Time of Donald Trump - MLA 2020

updated: 
Thursday, February 14, 2019 - 8:47am
Société Rencesvals, American-Canadian Branch
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 15, 2019

We welcome papers on how to approach Epic, a genre deeply invested in the exclusion of difference and aesthetics of violence, at a time when nationalist agendas abound. Interested participants should send a one-page abstract to Rebeca Castellanos (castellr@gvsu.edu) by March 15th.

Call for journal articles: "The Medieval in Modern Children's Literature" (ChLAQ)

updated: 
Thursday, February 14, 2019 - 8:46am
Kristin Bovaird-Abbo / Children's Literature Association Quarterly
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

The Medieval in Modern Children's Literature
A Special Issue of Children's Literature Association Quarterly

Edited by Kristin Bovaird-Abbo
Deadline: 1 November 2019

SEMA 2019 - Medieval Gateways: Threshold, Transition, Exchange

updated: 
Thursday, February 14, 2019 - 8:45am
Southeastern Medieval Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 3, 2019

Southeastern Medieval Association Conference

November 14-16, 2019

Greensboro, NC

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Medieval Gateways: Threshold, Transition, Exchange

 

The Southeastern Medieval Association is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for its 2019 Conference to be held at UNC-Greensboro, co-sponsored by UNCG, North Carolina Wesleyan College and Wake Forest University.

 

“Old English” at the 73rd Annual RMMLA Convention

updated: 
Thursday, February 14, 2019 - 8:34am
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 1, 2019

October 10-12, 2019

Hotel Paso del Norte, El Paso, Texas

 

Deadline for Abstracts: March 1, 2019

 

Old English, the language of the Germanic inhabitants of England dating from the time of their settlement in the 5th century to the end of the 11th century, has three dialects: West Saxon, Kentish, and Anglian; West Saxon was the language of Alfred the Great (871-901) and therefore achieved the greatest prominence.  This panel welcomes individual paper proposals dealing with any aspect of the Old English language, its dialects, and literature, which could include but is not limited to the following:

Language and voice

MLA 2020 in Seattle Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

updated: 
Thursday, February 14, 2019 - 8:38am
Jennifer Alberghini
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 15, 2019

Universities often separate into departments based on geographic regions as seen in the designations of “English” and “French.” Yet for medieval studies, these two regions were not completely separate entities, but deeply entwined with culture, land, and even leadership frequently changing hands or uniting them together. Based on the 2018 conference of the same name, this panel aims to bring together scholars of English and French—as well as other disciplines—to show how their work necessarily crosses the boundaries between these two fields.

SYNAESTHESIA [UCL English Graduate Conference 2019]

updated: 
Thursday, February 14, 2019 - 11:03am
University College London [Department of English Language & Literature]
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 5, 2019

University College London's Department of English is pleased to announce its annual graduate conference, 'SYNAESTHESIA', to be held on Friday 14th June 2019. We welcome proposals from Masters students, PhD students and recent graduates working in all literary periods on the theme of synaesthesia. What is the relationship between literature and the senses? And what kinds of unorthodox sensory experience can texts yield? How does written and oral language render or disturb the categories of sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch? And how do material texts become stimuli for synaesthetic experiences through their interaction with the physical bodies of writers and readers?

"Comparative Orientalisms"- MLA 2020 in Seattle

updated: 
Wednesday, February 6, 2019 - 12:34pm
MLA -- CLCS Medieval Forum
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 15, 2019

Just as there are many Orients, there are many Orientalisms, or approaches to, constructions of, and lenses upon the Orient.

Barbarous Tongues: Middle English and Beyond

updated: 
Wednesday, February 6, 2019 - 12:25pm
MLA Middle English Forum
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 3, 2019

Middle English language and literature’s status is a perennial matter of debate, whose immediate political subtexts include race, class, gender, and nation. Middle English texts themselves categorize barbarous tongues, mother tongues, lay and learned languages. How do medieval linguistic taxonomies politicize identity and territory, medieval or postmedieval? Can we locate concepts like the vulgar tongue and vernacular eloquence in our current critical lexicon? What is at stake in contemporary deployments of categories like classical, vernacular, or sacred language and world, national, provincial, or cosmopolitan language? How do these and other linguistic terms participate in the broader cultural politics of labels like barbarism and civilization?

Progress & Decline in the History of Political Thought

updated: 
Wednesday, February 6, 2019 - 12:31pm
Annual London Graduate Conference in the History of Political Thought, University of London
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 15, 2019

Progress & Decline in the History of Political Thought

10th Annual London Graduate Conference in the History of Political Thought

20-21 June 2019, London

Keynote address: Prof. Richard Whatmore (St. Andrews)

Old and Middle English Language and Literature: Medieval Merging of Old and New Knowledge and Practice

updated: 
Tuesday, January 29, 2019 - 8:57am
Midwest Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 5, 2019

The coexistence in practice though not always in name of sometimes very different knowledges is both an ancient and modern concern. The Middle Ages saw the development of the concept of translatio studii alongside a growing interest in translation from other languages and cultures, both ancient and contemporary. At its core, translatio studii is the absorption of knowledge or practice from one culture into another, resulting in a text or practice that presents itself as part of the dominant culture, but retains something of its origins as well.

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