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Hoccleve at Kalamazoo, 2019: Identity in Public Contexts: Hoccleve and Langland in Conversation

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 9:40am
Paper Session: 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9-12 May 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

While scholars often note that Hoccleve’s and Langland’s poetic personae each make the other more understandable, rarely have these poets been analyzed together in great detail. Thus, with this session, The International Hoccleve Society and International Piers Plowman Society seek to provide an occasion to do so. The Societies invite paper submissions that examine the ways interpretive discourses around Hoccleve’s and Langland’s works overlap and intersect.

Women and the Natural World in Medieval Literature

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Olivia Colquitt / Leeds IMC 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 24, 2018

This series of sessions proposes to explore the multifarious relationships between women and the natural world in medieval literature. We invite abstracts for papers on medieval texts of any language, genre, and period across the global Middle Ages. We particularly welcome submissions from doctoral candidates, early career researchers, and independent scholars. After receiving all submissions, papers will be organised into a number of linked sessions focussing on more specific topics within the overarching theme of women and the natural world.

Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to:

Disability before disability in the medieval Icelandic sagas (ICMS, Kalamazoo 2019)

updated: 
Saturday, September 1, 2018 - 8:02pm
Háskóli Íslands; Icelandic Research Fund
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

This panel (2 sessions) will consider the ways in which disability is represented in medieval Icelandic literature, particularly in medieval saga writing. Panellists will engage with the concept of disability beyond the traditional bio-medical understanding of the term, exploring disability as a social phenomenon embedded in social arrangements and cultural conventions. They will seek to understand what constituted disability in medieval Icelandic society, culture, and history prior to the establishment of disability as a modern legal, bureaucratic and administrative concept.

Renaissance Conference of Southern California

updated: 
Tuesday, August 28, 2018 - 2:44pm
Renaissance Conference of Southern California
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

Renaissance Conference of Southern California

63rd Annual Conference Saturday, 9 March 2019
The Huntington Library and Gardens Pasadena, CA

PLENARY ROUNDTABLE Teaching Race and the Renaissance

Amy Buono (Art History, Chapman University)
Ambereen Dadabhoy (Literature, Harvey Mudd College)
Liesder Mayea (Spanish, University of Redlands)
Danielle Terrazas Williams (History, Huntington Fellow 2018–19 and Oberlin College)

DIGITAL HUMANITIES TALK AND WORKSHOP

“The Huntington’s Collections: Virtual and Real”
Vanessa Wilkie (Curator of Medieval Manuscripts and British History, Huntington Library)

Kalamazoo sessions (4)

updated: 
Friday, August 24, 2018 - 11:16am
Medieval Studies, CUNY Graduate Center
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

Call for Papers

The Medieval Studies Certificate Program at the CUNY Graduate Center will sponsor four sessions at the 2019 International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo (May 9-12):

1) “Exchanging Cultures: Anglo-French Relations in the Middle Ages” [paper session]

Spenser at Kalamazoo, May 9-12, 2019

updated: 
Tuesday, August 21, 2018 - 10:19am
Spenser at Kalamazoo: International Congress of Medieval Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

SPENSER AT KALAMAZOO, MAY 9-12, 2019
54th International Congress on Medieval Studies
Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, Michigan)

This year we have two open sessions on any topic dealing with Edmund Spenser, and one roundtable session on teaching Spenser. 

 

Reading time for papers in the open sessions should not exceed twenty minutes. 

 

Panelists in the roundtable on teaching will speak for five minutes each and distribute copies of a handout.  

 

As always, we encourage submissions by newcomers, including graduate students, and by established scholars of all ranks. 

 

Sanctifying Violence

updated: 
Friday, August 17, 2018 - 10:27am
Lives and Afterlives The Forty-Fifth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium April 12-13, 2019 The University of the South, Sewanee, TN
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 26, 2018

Sanctifying Violence

Organizers: Elizabeth Maffetone and Joseph Morgan (Indiana University, Bloomington)

Female Agency in the Later Middle Ages

updated: 
Thursday, August 16, 2018 - 9:47am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Thirty years ago, in her seminal book, Holy Feast and Holy Fast: the Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women, Caroline Walker Bynum proposed that the later Middle Ages witnessed the rise of the first women’s movement in Christian history. Looking within and beyond the purview of religious devotion, this panel welcomes papers that corroborate, qualify, or critique Bynum’s claim by examining medieval representations of female agency. What constitutes female agency in late medieval literature, society and culture? To what end is it exerted? How and by whom is it celebrated and/or censured?

(Leeds IMC 2019) Materialities of Antipodal Medievalism: displaced materiality and cultural consumption of the northern Middle Ages for the peripheral medievalist.

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:57pm
Roderick McDonald/Australian Early Medieval Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 10, 2018

The Australian Early Medieval Association (AEMA) invites paper proposals for a panel at IMC Leeds 2019

Abstract: Antipodes are periphery to the European core, and recent developments in decolonization and the Global Middle Ages have contributed to understanding the inherent nature of a core/periphery dialectic that subsists in medieval studies.

Access for antipodal scholars (however defined) to the materialities (the products, the evidence) of medieval cultures of the northern hemisphere is heavily mediated, through hegemonic and competing mechanisms of scholarship (such as the academy) as well as through non-formal means, including popular and social media.

Langland's Library (IPPS 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:06pm
Ann E. Killian, Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 7, 2018

Paper Panel: “Langland’s Library”

The Outlaw Corpus and the Fight for Justice: Medieval Outlaw Narratives in Modern Form

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:52pm
International Association for Robin Hood Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 30, 2018

The Outlaw Corpus and the Fight for Justice: Medieval Outlaw Narratives in Modern Form

This cfp is for a round table for The Twelfth Biennial Conference of the International Association for Robin Hood Studies, to be held at the University of Montevallo (Montevallo, AL) from 14-17 May 2019. The theme of the conference is “Outlaw Bodies.”

Sex, Gender, and Race in the Atlantic and Mediterranean Worlds: A Comparative View

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:48pm
Patricia Ferrer-Medina and Janine Peterson, Marist College
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018

This seminar explores how Europeans constructed the identities of non-European and non-Christian peoples in the Atlantic and Mediterranean worlds. We invite papers that examine how Europeans racialized, sexualized, or in any way “othered” either Jews or Muslims in Southern Europe, the indigenous peoples of the Americas, or the peoples of North/West Africa that they encountered in Africa in addition to those encountered as slaves when traveling to the Caribbean and Central America. Renaissance and early modern European views of different peoples was closely connected to, and constructed by, prevailing ideas about gender and sexuality as well as notions of civilization and nature.

Kalamazoo 2019: Early Medieval Education

updated: 
Saturday, August 11, 2018 - 1:43pm
Sophia D'Ignazio, Cornell University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

 

CFP: EARLY MEDIEVAL EDUCATION

ICMS, Kalamazoo 9-12 May 2019

Language and Boundaries in the Brut @ ICMS 2019

updated: 
Saturday, August 11, 2018 - 11:24am
International Layamon's Brut Society
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

This is a session sponsored by the International Layamon's Brut Society for the 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 9-12, 2019, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI.  

‘Rex Quondam Rexque Futurus’: Reading Arthur Today

updated: 
Saturday, August 11, 2018 - 7:53am
The Apollonian. A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 3, 2018

Rex Quondam Rexque Futurus’: Reading Arthur Today

Ana Rita Martins & Diana Marques

School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon | ULICES

 

Beasts in the Brut @ ICMS 2019

updated: 
Monday, August 6, 2018 - 4:13pm
International Layamon's Brut Society
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

This is a session sponsored by the International Layamon's Brut Society for the 54th International Congress on Medieval Stodies, Western Michigan University, May 9-12, 2019.

Traversing time: Novel through ages

updated: 
Saturday, August 4, 2018 - 7:39am
Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies (LLIDS)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 10, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

Language, Literature, and Interdisciplinary Studies (LLIDS), an academic journal, invites original and unpublished research papers from scholars on the following:

Traversing time: Novel through ages

Doctor Virtualis 15: Mystics and Knowledge

updated: 
Friday, August 3, 2018 - 3:18pm
Università degli Studi di Milano
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

https://riviste.unimi.it/index.php/DoctorVirtualis/index

The most fundamental question from which this journal’s number arise is the following: is it possible to compare the specific attitude of a line of medieval mysticism thought with some aspects of contemporary thought? Which are important in particular?

A first element concerns the typical model of monastic reflection of the 12th century, in which the mystical perspective, with a strongly metaphorical language, drafts a cognitive itinerary in which the subject assimilates itself to the known object (dynamics that is illustrated with the analogy of the relationship between the lover and the loved).

Kalamazoo 2019: Wounds Visible and Invisible in Late Medieval Christianity

updated: 
Friday, August 3, 2018 - 3:11pm
Johanna Pollick, University of Glasgow & Hannah Kirby Wood, University of Toronto
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

This session at the 2019 International Congress on Medieval Studies examines the many valences of wounds in late medieval Christianity, focusing on themes surrounding wounds and wounding both visible (corporeal and/or material) and invisible (rhetorical and allegorical). The image of the wounded body held a central place in late medieval Christian practice and material culture; the wounds of the crucified Christ were tangible reminders of his Passion and served as foci of veneration, while stigmatic saints and maimed martyrs were marked as holy by means of bodily trauma.

The Materiality of the Word (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Friday, August 3, 2018 - 9:23am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

In a letter to his friend Axel Kaun, Samuel Beckett once described the “terrible materiality of the word surface” that faces every writer as they set pen to page. Their goal, Beckett claims, is to puncture this surface, boring holes into the word so that a different materiality “lurking behind” it might seep through. When the word is filled with holes, when what is said is ineffable and indescribable, it is no longer subordinated to its representative function. Rather, the word reveals its own sense and sensuousness, its materiality entirely distinct from that of its referent. The “sounding of impossible bodies” of the voices of the dead in M.

(Kalamazoo 2019) Exchanging Cultures: Anglo-French Relations in the Middle Ages

updated: 
Friday, August 3, 2018 - 9:23am
Steven F. Kruger, Medieval Studies Certificate Program, Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

Scholars agree that English and French, whether language, literature, or culture, had a strong relationship in the Middle Ages. Despite their mutual interactions and back-and-forth distribution of power, the portrayal of the relationship has remained fairly static, frequently described as French influence on English writing but not the other way around. Rather than a unidirectional influence, however, we should perhaps consider the relationship to be one of exchange. How might English ideas have influenced French ones? How might both peoples have viewed each other on a day-to-day level?

On the Road: Medieval Travel and Travelers

updated: 
Friday, August 3, 2018 - 9:18am
Indiana University Medieval Institute (MEST)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 1, 2018

"On the Road: Medieval Travel and Travelers" (March 22-23, 2019)

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