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Updated: PCA: Medievalism in Popular Culture, Washington DC, April 2019

updated: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018 - 9:06pm
Christina Francis/Bloomsburg University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

PCA/ACA 2019 National Conference, April 17th – 20th, 2019 – Washington, D.C.

The Medievalism in Popular Culture Area (including Anglo-Saxon, Robin Hood, Arthurian, Norse, and other materials connected to medieval studies) accepts papers on all topics that explore either popular culture during the Middle Ages or transcribe some aspect of the Middle Ages into the popular culture of later periods.  These representations can occur in any genre, including film, television, novels, graphic novels, gaming, advertising, art, etc.   For this year’s conference, I would like to encourage submissions on some of the following topics:

Presentist, Historical, and Unveiled Identities from Beowulf to the Eighteenth Century

updated: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 9:24am
Mark Kaethler / Medicine Hat College
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 15, 2018

This survey panel aims to establish dialogues between experts in early literatures. The confluence of epochs facilitates cross-historical discussion and provides a means for thinking about ways to teach early survey courses in university or college classrooms. This panel focuses on identities (racial, gendered, sexual, or mediatized, etc.). In recent years, scholars have labelled efforts to locate early forms of contemporary identity in early literature as presentist, an approach that tends to overlook differences between historical eras by prioritizing current concerns. However, are presentist methods actually flawed? And does any effort to trace earlier forms of current interests automatically constitute presentism?

16th Annual Tolkien at UVM Conference

updated: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 9:18am
Tolkien at the University of Vermont
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

16th Annual Tolkien at the UVM Conference: Tolkien and Horror

Saturday, April 6th 2019

Our theme this year is Tolkien and Horror. Consider submitting an abstract on this theme or on any subject. We encourage single papers or an organized session.

We are pleased to announce that our Keynote Speaker this coming year will be Professor Yvette Kisor (Ramapo College). Please consider submitting abstracts today to Christopher Vaccaro (cvaccaro@uvm.edu)! The deadline is January 15, 2019.

 

Teaching Christian Drama to Biblically Illiterate (and Semi-Literate) Audiences

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2018 - 4:05pm
Comparative Drama Conference-Orlando, Florida
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 15, 2018

Western civilization is deeply rooted in Judeo-Christian tradition and ideology, which goes a long way in explaining why the Bible is a shadow text on nearly every college literature syllabus. The heritage of the so-called “the book of books” spans the full historical spectrum of English writing, from its earliest specimens up to its most recent. For centuries, the bible offered up a common vocabulary and shared lens through which American college professors and their students could think and talk about literary history and culture.

 

Session on Medieval and Early Modern Drama

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2018 - 4:04pm
43rd Comparative Literature Conference-Orlando, FL
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 15, 2018

This session of the Comparative Drama Conference explores the ways in which this year’s conference locale—Orlando, Florida—crosses paths with the culture of medieval and early modern drama. Included among Central Florida’s most notable and popular theatrical productions are theme park stage adaptations of animated films and cinematic blockbusters (think Finding Nemo-The Musical etc.). How do medieval and early modern dramatic works similarly appropriate, convert and dramatize other types of scripted or choreographed performances (oral legends; religious rituals and practices; courtroom dramas; political spectacles etc.) —and to what practical and ideological ends?

 

Narrative & Nostalgia: The Crusades & American Civil War

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2018 - 3:55pm
Virginia Tech
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, December 15, 2018

Michel-Rolph Trouillot closed his 1995 Silencing the Past by reminding us that “History doesn’t belong only to its narrators, professional or amateur. While some of us debate what history is or was, others take it in their own hands.” This is nowhere more true than in two historical periods seldom in conversation - the 11th-century phenomenon called the Crusades, and the 19th-century American Civil War. Scholars across disciplines seek to clarify these periods among themselves, while popular audiences voraciously consume these and other retellings of the past, and others “take it in their own hands” by toppling monuments or explicitly evoking these periods as direct predecessors of their own.

“The Magical Mammal in Marie De France”

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2018 - 3:50pm
International Marie De France SPpnsored Session for 2019 MAP/ACMRS Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 20, 2018

Call For Papers for Sponsored Session

2019 MAP/ACMRS Conference;Magic, Religion, and Science in the Global Middle Ages and Renaissance 

 

“The Magical Mammal in Marie De France”

Medievalists @ Penn 11th Annual Conference - Mediocrity in the Middle Ages: Finding the Middle Ground

updated: 
Monday, September 24, 2018 - 3:39pm
Medievalists @ Penn
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 2, 2018

Mediocrity in the Middle Ages: Finding the Middle Ground11th Annual Medievalists @ Penn (M@P) Graduate ConferenceUniversity of Pennsylvania, February 22nd, 2019Confirmed Keynote Speaker: Sonja Drimmer (UMass Amherst, Art History) What makes something “mediocre” in the Middle Ages? We often assume that if a manuscript, literary text, or work of visual or performance art has survived from the medieval period, it is exceptional in some way. Modern scholarship tends to enforce this assumption by either praising a work for its beauty and importance, or arguing for the centrality and exceptionality of something that past scholarship has ignored. But what of things that have survived that are just OK?

The Gestures of Diplomacy: Gifts, Ceremony, Body Language (1400-1750)

updated: 
Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 10:21am
Nathalie Rivere de Carles & Premodern Diplomats Network
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 30, 2018

Call for Papers The Gestures of Diplomacy: Gifts, Ceremony, Body Language (1400-1750)  

Toulouse, France, 30th May - 1st June 2019.  

 

Confirmed Keynote speaker:  Ellen R. Welch (The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), author of A Theatre of Diplomacy (Penn, 2017)

 

English Postgraduate Essay Prize

updated: 
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 4:07am
English: The Journal of the English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The editors of English: the Journal of the English Association are pleased to
invite submissions to the journal’s annual essay competition exclusive to
postgraduates. The competition provides an ideal opportunity for students to
enhance their CV through the publication of their work in an excellent high-profile
journal that caters to a very wide range of genres, periods, and critical approaches.
We are looking for essays that provide new perspectives on canonical and/or noncanonical
Anglophone literatures, and therefore welcome submissions that focus on
single authors/texts or a range, and which develop original arguments beyond simple

Approaches to Medieval Bureaucracies: A Roundtable

updated: 
Thursday, September 13, 2018 - 12:53pm
Special Session, 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9-12 May 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

Close to 100 years ago, T. F. Tout was able to claim in his magisterial six-volume study of England’s letter-writing offices that the administrative history of thirteenth- and fourteenth-century England was "largely unwritten.” Within the last ten or twenty years, however, historians have undertaken socio-cultural studies of medieval bureaucracy and its personnel, moving from prosopographical and biographical sketches to nuanced examinations of the experience and challenges of bureaucratic employment throughout Europe.

Richard fitz Nigel’s Dialogue of the Exchequer: Literary, Economic, Political, and Spiritual Approaches

updated: 
Thursday, September 13, 2018 - 12:50pm
Paper Session: 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9-12 May 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

It is hard to exaggerate the novelty of English Treasurer Richard fitz Nigel’s Dialogue of the Exchequer, completed c. 1179. Often considered Europe’s first administrative manual, it required the invention of a new genre, the systematic thinking-through of collected bureaucratic knowledge and its categorization and organization. Successive generations of historians have mined this text for data about England’s taxation office and common law, but it has more to offer researchers of bureaucratic and institutional culture, medieval identity formation, and intertextuality. 

Hoccleve at Kalamazoo, 2019: Identity in Public Contexts: Hoccleve and Langland in Conversation

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 9:40am
Paper Session: 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9-12 May 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

While scholars often note that Hoccleve’s and Langland’s poetic personae each make the other more understandable, rarely have these poets been analyzed together in great detail. Thus, with this session, The International Hoccleve Society and International Piers Plowman Society seek to provide an occasion to do so. The Societies invite paper submissions that examine the ways interpretive discourses around Hoccleve’s and Langland’s works overlap and intersect.

Women and the Natural World in Medieval Literature

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Olivia Colquitt / Leeds IMC 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 24, 2018

This series of sessions proposes to explore the multifarious relationships between women and the natural world in medieval literature. We invite abstracts for papers on medieval texts of any language, genre, and period across the global Middle Ages. We particularly welcome submissions from doctoral candidates, early career researchers, and independent scholars. After receiving all submissions, papers will be organised into a number of linked sessions focussing on more specific topics within the overarching theme of women and the natural world.

Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to:

Disability before disability in the medieval Icelandic sagas (ICMS, Kalamazoo 2019)

updated: 
Saturday, September 1, 2018 - 8:02pm
Háskóli Íslands; Icelandic Research Fund
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

This panel (2 sessions) will consider the ways in which disability is represented in medieval Icelandic literature, particularly in medieval saga writing. Panellists will engage with the concept of disability beyond the traditional bio-medical understanding of the term, exploring disability as a social phenomenon embedded in social arrangements and cultural conventions. They will seek to understand what constituted disability in medieval Icelandic society, culture, and history prior to the establishment of disability as a modern legal, bureaucratic and administrative concept.

Renaissance Conference of Southern California

updated: 
Tuesday, August 28, 2018 - 2:44pm
Renaissance Conference of Southern California
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

Renaissance Conference of Southern California

63rd Annual Conference Saturday, 9 March 2019
The Huntington Library and Gardens Pasadena, CA

PLENARY ROUNDTABLE Teaching Race and the Renaissance

Amy Buono (Art History, Chapman University)
Ambereen Dadabhoy (Literature, Harvey Mudd College)
Liesder Mayea (Spanish, University of Redlands)
Danielle Terrazas Williams (History, Huntington Fellow 2018–19 and Oberlin College)

DIGITAL HUMANITIES TALK AND WORKSHOP

“The Huntington’s Collections: Virtual and Real”
Vanessa Wilkie (Curator of Medieval Manuscripts and British History, Huntington Library)

Kalamazoo sessions (4)

updated: 
Friday, August 24, 2018 - 11:16am
Medieval Studies, CUNY Graduate Center
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

Call for Papers

The Medieval Studies Certificate Program at the CUNY Graduate Center will sponsor four sessions at the 2019 International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo (May 9-12):

1) “Exchanging Cultures: Anglo-French Relations in the Middle Ages” [paper session]

Spenser at Kalamazoo, May 9-12, 2019

updated: 
Tuesday, August 21, 2018 - 10:19am
Spenser at Kalamazoo: International Congress of Medieval Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

SPENSER AT KALAMAZOO, MAY 9-12, 2019
54th International Congress on Medieval Studies
Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, Michigan)

This year we have two open sessions on any topic dealing with Edmund Spenser, and one roundtable session on teaching Spenser. 

 

Reading time for papers in the open sessions should not exceed twenty minutes. 

 

Panelists in the roundtable on teaching will speak for five minutes each and distribute copies of a handout.  

 

As always, we encourage submissions by newcomers, including graduate students, and by established scholars of all ranks. 

 

Sanctifying Violence

updated: 
Friday, August 17, 2018 - 10:27am
Lives and Afterlives The Forty-Fifth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium April 12-13, 2019 The University of the South, Sewanee, TN
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 26, 2018

Sanctifying Violence

Organizers: Elizabeth Maffetone and Joseph Morgan (Indiana University, Bloomington)

Female Agency in the Later Middle Ages

updated: 
Thursday, August 16, 2018 - 9:47am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Thirty years ago, in her seminal book, Holy Feast and Holy Fast: the Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women, Caroline Walker Bynum proposed that the later Middle Ages witnessed the rise of the first women’s movement in Christian history. Looking within and beyond the purview of religious devotion, this panel welcomes papers that corroborate, qualify, or critique Bynum’s claim by examining medieval representations of female agency. What constitutes female agency in late medieval literature, society and culture? To what end is it exerted? How and by whom is it celebrated and/or censured?

(Leeds IMC 2019) Materialities of Antipodal Medievalism: displaced materiality and cultural consumption of the northern Middle Ages for the peripheral medievalist.

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:57pm
Roderick McDonald/Australian Early Medieval Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 10, 2018

The Australian Early Medieval Association (AEMA) invites paper proposals for a panel at IMC Leeds 2019

Abstract: Antipodes are periphery to the European core, and recent developments in decolonization and the Global Middle Ages have contributed to understanding the inherent nature of a core/periphery dialectic that subsists in medieval studies.

Access for antipodal scholars (however defined) to the materialities (the products, the evidence) of medieval cultures of the northern hemisphere is heavily mediated, through hegemonic and competing mechanisms of scholarship (such as the academy) as well as through non-formal means, including popular and social media.

Langland's Library (IPPS 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:06pm
Ann E. Killian, Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 7, 2018

Paper Panel: “Langland’s Library”

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