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CFP: Old English Literature (Including Beowulf) for PAMLA Conference 2017 Honolulu, Hawaii (11/10-12/2017)

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:42pm
Derek Updegraff, California Baptist University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 26, 2017

This panel seeks any and all papers on Old English literature (and Beowulf), especially in relation to this year's theme of sight, visuality, and ways of seeing. 

Individual paper presentations will be between 15 and 20 minutes long. Please submit proposals via the online system by June 26, 2017. The PAMLA 2017 Conference will be held at the lovely Chaminade University of Honolulu (with the official conference hotel being the Ala Moana) from Friday, November 10 to Sunday, November 12.

Paper proposals must be made via our online system found here:

PAMLA Children's Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:44pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 26, 2017

The session is focused on the themes of visibility, visuality, and ways of seeing, and we are also interested in receiving submissions addressing other aspects of children's literature (including forms such as folktales, fables, fairytales, and nursery rhymes; conduct books, spelling books, school books). Please feel free to share the general call for papers with anyone who might have a paper to contribute: Paper proposals must be made via the online system found here: 

http://pamla.org/2017/topic-areas 

Arthurian Legend in the 20th & 21st Centuries

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:49pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 29, 2017

Imagining Arthurian Legend in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Nostalgia for an imagined and glorious past has influenced the evolution of stories about King Arthur and his court for centuries.  According to the moods and needs of the period, new characters were added to demonstrate or question the excellence of these paragons, or to replace those who had perhaps become too human or simply gone out of style.  New plot motifs, such as the search for the grail and Lancelot’s love for Guinevere became part of the legend.

Middle English Including Chaucer

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:40pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 26, 2017

The deadline for submission of proposals for the session on Middle English Including Chaucer at the 2017 Conference of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Literature Association has been extended to May 26.  The conference will be held the weekend of November 10-12 at Chaminade University in Honolulu, Hawai`i.  More details are available at http://pamla.org/news/2016/11/16/2017-pamla-conference.

Proposals must be submitted via PAMLA's online paper submission system: http://pamla.org/2017/topic-areas

CFP for Medieval and Renaissance Area, MAPACA (formerly "Beowulf to Shakespeare")

updated: 
Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 1:18pm
Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association (MAPACA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 30, 2017

MAPACA (Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association) 2017

28th Annual Conference

Philadelphia, PA

November 9-11, 2017

 

Medieval and Renaissance (formerly called “Beowulf to Shakespeare”)

 

The wealth of material found in the Middle Ages and Renaissance continues to attract modern audiences with new creative works that make use of medieval and/or early modern themes, characters, or plots. This is a call for papers or panels dealing with any aspect of medieval or Renaissance representations in popular culture.  Topics for this area include, but are not limited to:

 

CfP: 5th International Symposium "Days of Justinian I", Byzantium and the Slavs: Medieval and Modern Perceptions and Receptions, Skopje, 17-18 November

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:51pm
Mitko Panov / Euro-Balkan University, University of Bologna
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 10, 2017

5th INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIUM 

"DAYS OF JUSTINIAN II"
Special Thematic Strand for 2017
“Byzantium and the Slavs: Medieval and Modern Perceptions and Receptions”    

Skopje, 17-18 November, 2017

Organised by “EURO-BALKAN UNIVERSITY, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia 

Law and (Dis)Order: Call for Papers and Panels

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:54pm
Sewanee Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 26, 2017

The Sewanee Medieval Colloquium invites papers exploring aspects of law, order, disorder and resistance in all aspects of medieval cultures. This includes legal codes, social order, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, poetic or artistic form, gender construction, racial divisions, scientific and philosophical order, the history of popular rebellion, and other ways of conceptualizing our theme.

Law and (Dis)Order: Call for Panel Themes

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:55pm
Sewanee Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 27, 2017

The Sewanee Medieval Colloquium invites proposals for panel themes engaging with forms of law, order, disorder and resistance in all aspects of medieval cultures. These sub-themes address a particular aspect of our general theme, and could be the basis for either one or two panels. As a rule of thumb, panel themes should be broad enough to encourage numerous applicants, and interdisciplinary proposals are particularly encouraged.

TEXTS AND TERRITORIES: THE CURIOUS HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE AGES

updated: 
Tuesday, May 16, 2017 - 1:47pm
Hülya Taflı Düzgün, PhD, Medievalist, Deparment of English Language and Literature, Faculty of Letters, University of Erciyes, Kayseri, Turkey
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 30, 2017

The writing of a literary text is as a retrospective explanation of what is happening in the present and such writing is the deliberate re-creation in actual practice. This present includes social, cultural, religious and political events. The impact of immediate contemporary concerns is served to place a literary text at least partly outside the author’s control. The author responds to a given context of historical and cultural incident that limits his freedom to invent or adapt or explain.

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